T Nation

Sprinting and Bodybuilding


#1

Hey guys I was wondering how I should prioritize my sprint trainings with weight training. Do I have to schedule differently? I've been working out for a long time but I'm just worried about overtraining my cns


#2

Whats your routine look like and what are you training for specifically?


#3

You won't "overtrain your CNS". As far as I'm concerned, that's a crock of shit for anybody but the most elite of athletes. And maybe them too. Overtraining your joints, muscles, tendons...sure, those are definitely possible, and within the realm of plausibility for people that think more is always better. But enough with this CNS shit.

As far as it interfering with leg training goes, there's a few ways to go about it. If you train legs once per week (give or take a day), you could do sprints after leg day, then again 2 days later, than 2 days later. That still gives legs 3ish days to recover before leg day in the gym again after the last time you do sprints. If you were to do them 3x per week like that, you'd probably want to keep sprinting volume per session pretty low. Or you could do them after leg day, then again 3 days later, so 2x per week. If you did that, you could afford to push sprinting intensity and volume up higher.

Ultimately, you'll have to try it out a few different ways, see what works best for you, and always be ready to make little tweaks to your programming as needed, and as you understand your body better over time, and become more advanced (hopefully).


#4

^ I agree with Hungry.

But more importantly, what is your number 1 priority? Improving sprint speed/effectiveness, or are your goals more lift/physique related?

Knowing that would be important when deciding where to place sprints.


#5

I concur. I always try to do my Interval training before rather than the day after squats, because I find it easier to recover from intervals than from squats.

Disclaimer: my intervals are done on an elliptical because my knees don't like impact.


#6

I think most people GROSSLY underestimate how much punishment the body can take. Provided of course, you are eating a reasonable amount of food.


#7

Elliptical being the key word, which is probably why you find it easier to recover from intervals.

As the others have said, it depends how strenuous and serious your sprint training is relative to your weight training. But yeah as a general rule of thumb you would ideally have a sprint session followed by a heavy leg day 2 days later then another 2 days off before another proper sprint session.

But I think the structuring of a training regime like that is secondary to your nutrition and recovery. If you're getting your food and supplements in effectively I'm sure you could minimise your rest periods between activities to more closely correspond to how your body feels.


#8

And yeah as Teledin inferred, don't be afraid to go a little over board to experiment a bit. It's best to set your upper limitation first and then you can work from that.


#9

Actually I am more physique oriented. But I've hit a fat loss plateau at 9% body fat 155 pounds. I'm 16 170cm Asian. I would likem to get down to 7%. is sprinting the way to go?


#10

I'll do interval sprints 5 times a week, weight train 4 times a week
20x 100 with 30 secs rest (morning training)
Weight training (.2pm)
Walking for 1hour (8pm)
I take in around 2.6k calories a day and try to create a deficit for fat loss. I'm trying to get thru a fat lossplataeu and I need help! Thanks bro:)


#11

Lucas, you're already skinny...if your goals are physique oriented, you should be putting on some muscle, not LOSING weight. You'll just go from skinny kid to skeleton kid otherwise.

However, I realize you are 16...and in this day and age, it's "cool" to be really skinny and stuff in high school. Your choice.


#12

Thank you for your suggestion. I would like to bulk but I'm afraid of getting too Fat along with it. I do appreciate great physiques but I read that you have to get to a really low bodyfat before you start bulking. Is that true?


#13

what are your goals? this is bodybuilding..to get anywhere in this game you need to eat to blow up. you wont get "fat" unless you skip the lifting weights part..
sprinting is great for any kind of weight training. sled/car pulls etc.. great potential for adding lots of power and size (dont forget to squat and deadlift too!). sprinters have awesome hamstings.


#14

If you are doing 20 reps of 100m sprints..with only 30 seconds rest.. you must be referring to 100m running, not SPRINTing..


#15

yeah trudat. well ultimately, i want a great physique, but ive read that spriting would help me in that goal. And yeah i wanna start bulking, but the thing is ive been trying to figure out how much over maintenance do i need to build muscle slowly and not have the unwanted fat gain? Also, if i choose to continue doing intensive cardio on a bulk(i like to be physically fit), is that still possible?


#16

What is the appeal of slow gaining? I can't seem to get enough now that I've started...


#17

Your likely to lose muscle mass sprinting 5 times a week in a caloric deficit. And a point to think about - you need a lot of muscle mass to look impressive at very low bodyfat levels


#18

Don't believe shit just because you read it somewhere on the internet. Where would you be in life if you applied that to every pursuit? Compare it to real world results...talk to people significantly larger/stronger than you, people who have accomplished your goals OR MORE, and ask them how THEY got there. Everything else is just bullshit, man. I've gotten to a lean 200 lbs without every NOT having visible abs, and I would be heavier/stronger if it wasn't for the Marine Corps delaying my long-term goals for the time being. That's just one example, and whiel everyone isn't exactly the same, yes you can get quite large and strong without ever getting fat, by any means. Could you get bigger and stronger by not being afraid of a little chubs? Sure. But it's your choice.


#19

Dude, you ARE at a really low bodyfat. Starting eating to gain. You're in a good place to start.