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Sports Massage or Deep Tissue?

I need a massage. A legit massage. I’ve never got one before. What’s more appropriate for a ‘bodybuilder’. Sports massages claim to be good for ‘overused muscles’ (all of my muscles are overused, this isn’t a bad thing IMO) and connective tissue. Deep tissue claims to be good for knots and built up tension.

I have no injuries.
I’m moderately flexible.
I don’t foam roll.
My posterior chain in general is usually tight, compared to the rest of me at least.
My joints are healthy.
I have no idea if any of this information is relevant lol.

Ok so does anyone have any experience? I know it’ll be painful. I was thinking a half hour would be ok for a first time.

Any happy ending jokes are welcomed.

edited

I get massages when I can afford it, which unfortunately is every few months.

If you just want general stress relief then get a regular massage (not sure what a sports massage is).

If you feel tight anywhere or have never had deep tissue, I’d go for that. I might hurt like a bitch, but in the end you’ll feel awesome.

It’s amazing how I get some knots around the edge of my scapula, hurts like hell but feels oh so good.

Just don’t let them dig into your lats, holy fuck that hurts, lol

ps- HolyMac will probably offer you a free happy ending, go to him. So I’ve heard :wink:


Any reccomendations for a place in NYC is cool too. Preferably the place where she works ^

So I’ve had several people tell me I have THE worst knots in my upper/mid back that they have ever felt…and I got a deep tissue massage and the chick basically worked those knots the entire hour. And STILL never got them out. It was ridiculously painful and I still have the knots - my gf tells me I need to go get them taken care of, she’s honestly worried about me because of how bad/big they are. But they never bother me or give me any pain/issue so I don’t know if its worth the pain.

What’s the benefit to getting the knots taken care of? lol

[quote]josh86 wrote:

What’s the benefit to getting the knots taken care of?[/quote]

This^

I have a wee bit of a problem as well…

Deep tissue is more intense and longer lasting in general compared to a “sports massage.”

I am pretty sure the typical sports massage therapist is more concerned with tightness and flexibility than tissue knots.

And yes, the intensity of the deep tissue massage is entirely a function of the actual masseuse. A friend of mine goes regularly and has this huge MMA trainer / former body builder massage him. Supposedly, the guy is amazing but i have yet to make an appointment. Please don’t be the type to think it’s “gay” to get a massage from a guy; go for the most requested therapist at a place or someone you KNOW will give a very strong massage.

I knew this woman who was a gardener for 30 years before she became a masseuse. Strongest hands I have ever seen and she was pretty petite.

[quote]countingbeans wrote:
josh86 wrote:

What’s the benefit to getting the knots taken care of?

This^

I have a wee bit of a problem as well…[/quote]

I can vouch for the benefits of deep tissue massage. I had debilitating pain in my achilles tendons and massive knots in my calves, to the point where I had trouble walking. I was seeing a sports massage therapist who I thought used a lot of pressure, but I felt he just wasn’t getting to the root of the problem. The clinic owner recommended another masseur. His treatments were brutal, the pain was excruciating, but after a few weeks of 75 minute weekly treatments I’m almost completely pain-free and the knots are gone. He also works on trigger points and deep knots all over my body. The worst were in the biceps, triceps and I.T. bands. I’ll continue to see him bi-weekly for “tuneups”.

Here’s a summary of deep tissue massage benefits, from an ezine article:

What are the benefits of a Deep Tissue Massage?

Unlike a regular relaxation massage, deep tissue massage works effectively on the skeletal structures that lie deep within the body.

Many people seek a deep tissue massage to help in treating crippling diseases, muscle, tendon and ligament injuries. When muscles are stressed, they block oxygen and nutrients, leading to inflammation that builds up toxins in the muscle tissue.

Through controlled manual manipulation, deep tissue massage breaks down scar tissue and crystallization, loosens muscles, releases toxins and allows blood and oxygen to circulate properly.

It is important to drink plenty of water afterwards to flush away the toxins released during massage.

The key benefits of deep tissue massage include:

â?¢ Elimination of the blocks that cause muscle tightness

â?¢ Increases circulation of blood, lymph, cerebro-spinal and interstitial fluids

â?¢ Can resolve many chronic pain patterns by releasing deeply held emotions that cause tension

â?¢ Helps improve the functioning of the internal organs and any associated symptoms or diseases

â?¢ Improves posture and mobility

â?¢ Helps to reduce tension and the automatic reflexes to stress

How effective is Deep Tissue Massage?

Deep tissue massage can be very effective, but one has to be realistic about how much can be achieved in one session. Simply asking for more pressure and thinking that if the therapist pushes hard enough, all tension will be released within an hour is unrealistic. Chronic knots and tension built up over a lifetime can only be addressed with a series of treatments.

Thanks for the suggestions so far

Any other opinions?

[quote]BONEZ217 wrote:
I need a massage. A legit massage. I’ve never got one before. What’s more appropriate for a ‘bodybuilder’. Sports massages claim to be good for ‘overused muscles’ (all of my muscles are overused, this isn’t a bad thing IMO) and connective tissue. Deep tissue claims to be good for knots and built up tension.

I have no injuries.
I’m moderately flexible.
I don’t foam roll.
My posterior chain in general is usually tight, compared to the rest of me at least.
My joints are healthy.
I have no idea if any of this information is relevant lol.

Ok so does anyone have any experience? I know it’ll be painful. I was thinking a half hour would be ok for a first time.

Any happy ending jokes are welcomed.
[/quote]

That is awesome. I was thinking about the exact same thing today and don’t even have to post about it.

Another question that’s off topic from the “actual” massage, is what do you guys do for tips? Are they included in the price, do you give 15% or does it just depend on the place?

That actually is one thing that has been problematic to me.

On the one hand, it seems to me to be a professional service. One doesn’t tip a doctor, a chiropractor, a dentist, a lawyer, an accountant, etc. My ART provider certainly doesn’t expect a tip and I thoroughly expect would refuse it.

On the other hand, it’s obviously a custom at least among many massage therapists even though they want to be (and justifiably so) viewed as professional health care providers, rather than in the category of hairdressers, nail technicians, and so forth.

On still the other hand, the fee is high enough (I was paying $80 when getting it) that that really ought to suffice, and if the provider does not think so, he or she should simply have a higher rate.

And on the fourth hand, I could scarcely afford the $80 previously and now have just discontinued entirely though I could still use it. And my massage therapist certainly didn’t seem to object.

As a yet further point, I also didn’t really care for the fact that the fee for those who had insurance coverage was much less than I was paying as self-pay. With the $80 I was already paying more than they would be paying even if they added a huge tip.

That is the only thing I can think of where it is customary (apparently) to tip that I have not done so.

Why not get a foam roller?

From my experience of deap tissue and sports massage’s are they get about 50% of the nots out then your session is over anyway.

Anyone who has tightness in their hips , upper back or itb’s must get a foam roller.

And don’t be a panzy when you feel it going up your itb. OUCH

weed plus a tennis ball is fucking magical. I’m sure allot of the tight ass anti fun people will poo poo the idea. But once you’ve gotten high and laid on a tennis ball you can thank me later.

Yeah tennis balls are awesome for your rhomboids. Just need a pack of them if your heavy.

[quote]josh86 wrote:
So I’ve had several people tell me I have THE worst knots in my upper/mid back that they have ever felt…and I got a deep tissue massage and the chick basically worked those knots the entire hour. And STILL never got them out. It was ridiculously painful and I still have the knots - my gf tells me I need to go get them taken care of, she’s honestly worried about me because of how bad/big they are. But they never bother me or give me any pain/issue so I don’t know if its worth the pain.

What’s the benefit to getting the knots taken care of? lol[/quote]

I’m sure increase in strength is one of them.

I get massages time to time as well. I got a a male masseuse and I once asked him what a deep tissue massage felt like. Well, holy ballz…The pain is tolerable but not like any other “regular massage”. Some people actually bruise when they get a normal massage but imagine a deep tissue. I’m glad I do not bruise very easily.

BONEZ, get a male masseuse like Ponce said and get past the “thinking” it’s gay part.

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

I mentioned in another thread that Active Release Technique finally got the big knot out of my lower back - and I was in PAIN. If you go to the website below and type in your zip code you may find a provider in your area. As in most things, the practitioner makes the difference. All I know is it was 10 minutes, twice per week for 4 weeks, and both the knot and the pain are gone, hopefully, for good. Check it out.

http://www.activerelease.com/

sports massage can be used pre, inter or post event and should be changed accordingly. deep tissue is more remedial and is used to fix problems, there is so much cross over between the two that there really is no dividing line.

I treat 8 people a day and have taught massage of all types, massuers are like everyone else you find good ones and not so good ones, just like plumbers builders etc. If a good massuer by reputation and go see. In 10 years I have had only one “gay approach” and the poor bastard went out of the clinic a lot quicker than when he came in, I know how to hurt (legally). By the way I am ex military and LEO and my present job is the best I have ever had.

GET SOME THERAPY !!!

cheers Spud

[quote]pushharder wrote:
PonceDeLeon wrote:
…Please don’t be the type to think it’s “gay” to get a massage from a guy; go for the most requested therapist at a place or someone you KNOW will give a very strong massage…

Can’t and won’t do it. Especially with a deep tissue massage which involves some “good” pain I simply couldn’t relax with a male. Not to mention that my ass typically needs massaging as much or more than any other muscle group on my body and there is simply no way a male is touching it (I’ve always opted for being naked during massage too).

I’m not saying it’s gay. I am saying I don’t want it and don’t care if someone thinks I’m being homophobic. [/quote]

I don’t think you’re being homophobic. It sounds more like you just have a problem with sexual hang-ups with messages/physical therapy with males.
My chiropractor is a retired powerlifter and one of the biggest dudes I know. I have no problem letting him touch my glutes and hip flexors if it means the difference between a squat PR and a miss. The finger strength of the practitioner is extremely important. I mean who would you rather have fixing your problems…a woman that uses pink dumbbells or a man that could close a CoC #3?

Try to think of it like any other doctor. Maybe that will help.

Also…
Two excellent foam rolling/soft tissue repair articles from T-Nation.