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Sports As Cardio for BBers

I’m curious, you see countless articles on HIT type cardio, “standard” bodybuilding cardio but never anything on sports as cardio for bodybuilders. Why isn’t sport more recommended as a form of cardio in substitution to spending hours on a treadmill? You’re still participating in cardiovascular activity but it’s actually fun and not some dull exercise done in necessity.

[quote]Gettnitdone wrote:
I’m curious, you see countless articles on HIT type cardio, “standard” bodybuilding cardio but never anything on sports as cardio for bodybuilders. Why isn’t sport more recommended as a form of cardio in substitution to spending hours on a treadmill? You’re still participating in cardiovascular activity but it’s actually fun and not some dull exercise done in necessity.[/quote]

Sports are good cardio.

The only reasoning I can think of would be the much greater risk of injury.

I’ve had 0 injuries from sprinting or running, or walking, or the stepmill.

I have an ankle that has not completely healed from a bad sprang and possible hairline fracture (never went to the doctor) after playing pick up basketball and reinjuring during intramural flag football.

[quote]austin_bicep wrote:

[quote]Gettnitdone wrote:
I’m curious, you see countless articles on HIT type cardio, “standard” bodybuilding cardio but never anything on sports as cardio for bodybuilders. Why isn’t sport more recommended as a form of cardio in substitution to spending hours on a treadmill? You’re still participating in cardiovascular activity but it’s actually fun and not some dull exercise done in necessity.[/quote]

Sports are good cardio.

The only reasoning I can think of would be the much greater risk of injury.

I’ve had 0 injuries from sprinting or running, or walking, or the stepmill.

I have an ankle that has not completely healed from a bad sprang and possible hairline fracture (never went to the doctor) after playing pick up basketball and reinjuring during intramural flag football.[/quote]

Yeah, you’re probably right.

Yeah ask IFBB Pro Joel Stubbs. Tore both quads playing bball after leg day. It’s an old bodybuilding saying that pretty much says, don’t do anything outside of bodybuilding.

Holy shit, both quads? Do you think his muscularity and lack of mobility contributed to that injury or do you think it can happen to any one of us? I’ve played sports my entire life, including after gaining 30lbs of muscle since my senior year of HS and I’ve only sprained my ankle once or twice playing basketball, tennis and gridiron.

[quote]austin_bicep wrote:
Sports are good cardio.

The only reasoning I can think of would be the much greater risk of injury.[/quote]
Basically this. Asking someone with frequently poor mobility (to generalize/stereotype) to do an activity with random movement patterns is increasing the injury potential farther than most care to or need to.

Also, recreational sports don’t offer the same “reliability” as basic cardio. If I run on a 10-degree incline treadmill at 10.3 speed, I know I’ll get a results I can repeat next session. If I join my local dodgeball league, I can’t guarantee that I’ll get “a good workout” every single match or practice, and if I’m focusing on “getting a good workout”, then I won’t be focused on playing at 100%.

[quote]SavagedNatiion wrote:
It’s an old bodybuilding saying that pretty much says, don’t do anything outside of bodybuilding.[/quote]
Not for nothing, but it can’t be that old of a saying. Up into the '50s, bodybuilders were not only often accomplished gymnasts or Olympic lifters, but bodybuilding contests were often scored for muscularity, symmetry, posing, and athleticism (usually judged on the Olympic lifts).

But I do agree, just like when you’re trying to prioritize almost any physical activity/sport, it’s usually best to minimize your participation in other sports for several reasons.

[quote]Gettnitdone wrote:
Holy shit, both quads? Do you think his muscularity and lack of mobility contributed to that injury or do you think it can happen to any one of us? I’ve played sports my entire life, including after gaining 30lbs of muscle since my senior year of HS and I’ve only sprained my ankle once or twice playing basketball, tennis and gridiron.[/quote]

I don’t think you have anytjing to worry about. While i definitely agree with Colucci, unless your goal is to place at the national level or IFBB future, there’s no completely terrible reason not to do sports as cardio. I mean, you have to live your life right? It’s supposed to be fun.

The big issue comes with lack of mobility and dynamic flexibilty that many top level competitora show, which has increased the injury risk even more. Obviously sports has a higher risk than “normal”, but if youre mobile, and have goos movement mechanics it is not abnormally high. Once those go out the window, you are asking for injury.

Basically, if you just want to be jacked and lean, sports are great. If you want to be a top competitive physique, sports are a career risk.

Its all about priorities.

If you want to maximize your bodybuilding efforts, either no sports or just activities that you have controlled conditions (e.g. Practicing a jump shot vs playing 3 on 3).

If you want to maximize your sport performance, training towards that goal and you still should end up with a pretty nice physique, but most likely not a “bodybuilder’s physique” unless you are truly blessed gene pool wise.

Just remember to live life!

Like someone else said, depends on your goals, as well as your current condition, the level of the specific sport you plan on engaging in, and how well you adhere to playing ‘safe’.

I laughed a few years back after Cordvoa informed me that he had opted not to go snowboarding with a current gf because he couldn’t risk the an injury if he wanted to compete that year. You know what though? I haven’t skied a single winter since I started competing. Why? Didn’t wanna risk an injury -lol.

Now I’m sure I probably could have, but the way I am with my preps, do I really wanna be swishing around on the slopes with every pocket of my jacket jammed with chicken breasts, cashews, raw broccoli?

Think about it though, guys who actually play a sport competitively, whether pro, or just damn serious amateur, get injured all the time. Bodybuilders put so much additional stress on their joints and connective tissue, that engaging in actual ‘real’ activities as opposed to the very controlled environment of the gym (limited and guided ROMs, isolating specific muscles instead of movement patterns…), that it’s really not uncommon to get hurt doing something that seems almost silly.

S

I dont compete so I guess most wouldnt consider me a bodybuilder but I would never sit out of playing sports with buddies over the chance of injury. I might get in a car accident tomorrow. I play some sport around 4 times a week and although I do get small injuries, I work around them. Life is too short to not do things in fear of injury. If I were a few weeks out of a competition, I’d be singing a different tune but any other time I would go for it. Sports are one of life’s greatest joys. For me anyway

[quote]cally wrote:
I dont compete so I guess most wouldnt consider me a bodybuilder but I would never sit out of playing sports with buddies over the chance of injury. I might get in a car accident tomorrow. I play some sport around 4 times a week and although I do get small injuries, I work around them. Life is too short to not do things in fear of injury. If I were a few weeks out of a competition, I’d be singing a different tune but any other time I would go for it. Sports are one of life’s greatest joys. For me anyway[/quote]

Nope, i totally agree. I agree with Colucci and Stu about the risks, but when it comes down to it, i like skiing, rock climbing (tore a ligamen in my hand last time, but totally worth it and my grip is back to normal), basketball, slacklining, flag football, ultimate frisbee…you name it. Life is fucking awesome, and as Ferris Bueller says, “if you don’t stop to look around once in a while, you could miss it”. Too awesome to not hike, climb, hunt, fish, and ski.

Obviously if you are competing the meet or event prep comes first. But if you want to be jacked and lean, you can do that with sports in the side as long as you accept the risk. I opt for #2 most times, if i die on my motorcycle it won’t really matter how close i was to an elite total or anything else…but the times i spent with people will be waaaaay better than being known as “that fucking huge guy that died”

I do Krav Maga twice a week and i used to play in rugby matches through the winter. I’ll go skiing with friends most winters and wake boarding in the summer. I don’t compete, so if doing this or missing a meal while I’m skiing or what ever it’s not the end of the world. I just might miss out on a pound or so of muscle that year. But I’ll still enjoy the training as much, and I’ll still have a body better than 95% of the guys on the beach!

I dont compete so most of the satisfaction i get from lifting comes from playing sports.

I think the reason is that for some people Bodybuilding is the only so called sport or activity they engage in, so these cardio suggestions assume you don’t have any other activities.

When I did martial arts I did little to no extra cardio. Now I hit the elliptical and treadmill as I need it, I just used common sense.

Just to touch back on this thread, I didn’t mean to come off at “hating” on sports or anything. I was mainly addressing the question in the OP:[quote]Why isn’t sport more recommended as a form of cardio in substitution to spending hours on a treadmill?[/quote]
Doing sports instead of doing cardio for fat loss is simply inefficient, at the very least. Playing a sport in addition to lifting and cardio work is something else. I work with some paintball players and if a guy came to me and said he wanted to get ripped, I’d factor in the dedicated cardio around the paintball practices. I wouldn’t tell him to give up the sport for a few months while we get some abs.

[quote]Aragorn wrote:
Basically, if you just want to be jacked and lean, sports are great. If you want to be a top competitive physique, sports are a career risk.[/quote]
^ Pretty much sums it up.

[quote] Gettnitdone wrote:
Holy shit, both quads? Do you think his muscularity and lack of mobility contributed to that injury or do you think it can happen to any one of us?[/quote]
Stubbs talked about the accident in a MuscleMag interview. Seems like it was kind of a perfect storm for serious injury - pre-existing issues, heavy leg training prior to playing, and some dude actually falling on him. Something that catastrophic isn’t exactly in the cards for everyone:

[quote]“It was 1997,” recalls Joel. “I’d played a little college basketball. I had a lot of wear and tear on the knees from all that vigorous training. I used to have a lot of pain when I’d run the floor hard. After that I came back home and played a bit of night league basketball where government agencies, like the airline, get together and play ball.”

Joel, then an airline pilot for Bahamasair (he now splits time as a stand-by pilot and flight simulator instructor) had started bodybuilding the year prior. He’d found the act of refining his physique came naturally and had already started to add some of that now-famous mass. Unfortunately, his dedication to the iron would prove disastrous on the hardwood.

“That particular night, I’d trained legs,” he says. “After all that heavy squatting and leg pressing, I told my workout partner that I was going to play ball and he told me to go home, eat and rest myself. But I felt good so I went anyway. In the second half, some guy had a breakaway and I ran at him to go block him and as I rose I felt this pain in my right kneecap. He fell on me and put too much pressure on my left knee, tearing my left patellar tendon.”[/quote]
Interestingly enough, looks like SLAM Magazine (a mag all about basketball) actually had an interview with Phil Heath last year. In it, even he briefly addresses the issue of risk:

[quote]SLAM: Do you still play?

PH: Occasionally, but I don’t dunk anymore. Wouldn’t be so smart when I’m carrying 270 pounds.[/quote]

As was said, it’s about priorities. If you want to be a competitive bodybuilder, don’t expect to stay in your flag football league.

[quote]austin_bicep wrote:

[quote]Gettnitdone wrote:
I’m curious, you see countless articles on HIT type cardio, “standard” bodybuilding cardio but never anything on sports as cardio for bodybuilders. Why isn’t sport more recommended as a form of cardio in substitution to spending hours on a treadmill? You’re still participating in cardiovascular activity but it’s actually fun and not some dull exercise done in necessity.[/quote]

Sports are good cardio.

The only reasoning I can think of would be the much greater risk of injury.

I’ve had 0 injuries from sprinting or running, or walking, or the stepmill.

I have an ankle that has not completely healed from a bad sprang and possible hairline fracture (never went to the doctor) after playing pick up basketball and reinjuring during intramural flag football.[/quote]

This. Game of pickup bball with some co workers turned into a seperated shoulder that kicked me out of the iron for almost 6 months, a full year to be 100%.

I’ve learned my lesson as well, thanksgiving 2011, flag football with friends. I went for a tag and landed on my right shoulder banged up my rotator cuff bad, couldn’t curl, bench, row, press nothing. I was completely out of the gym for my upper nody for 2 months. I known gym guys in bars being egged on to arm wrestle some guy and sprain their elbows and wrists.