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Spine with no kyphosis

Hi,
About a year ago, it came to my attention that my upper back was completely flat; there simply is no kyphosis to it. From what I found, the condition is called “hypokyphosis” (… could have guessed) and I’ve only found one exercise to correct it, which I started only a few days ago. There is a lot of documentation about hyperkyphosis on the internet (e.g. ‘the Neanderthal no more’ series) but very little regarding hypokyphosis. As a result, I decided to post here to gather more information about the subject and especially to know how to finally get some upper back curve.

Thanks in advance for your help !

Deadlift as heavy as possible.

What technique should I use ? Rounded upper-back ? (Serious question)

Serious question, why do you care about having no kyphosis?

It’s probably only good for you. And it probably makes you taller.

No kyphosis and no lordosis is what you should aim for - make the spine a completely straight line.

[quote]alternate wrote:
Serious question, why do you care about having no kyphosis?

It’s probably only good for you. And it probably makes you taller.

No kyphosis and no lordosis is what you should aim for - make the spine a completely straight line.[/quote]

You have to be trolling us right now.

[quote]rlBanda wrote:

[quote]alternate wrote:
Serious question, why do you care about having no kyphosis?

It’s probably only good for you. And it probably makes you taller.

No kyphosis and no lordosis is what you should aim for - make the spine a completely straight line.[/quote]

You have to be trolling us right now.[/quote]

+1.

Crushed discs, pinched nerves, where do I start…

@rlBanda and 238: I thought the same.

The spine should form an S, not a straight line, otherwise the pressure on it is simply too much to deal with as it is not distributed between the various curves. I try my best to stand “normally” and so far, so good. I noticed some curve appearing, which gives me hope as to the results I can achieve. I am maybe 1 cm shorter but it is simply because I’m not trying anymore to pull the shoulders back exagerately nor trying to make myself taller by “lengthening” the neck. However, if anybody have information or exercises, I’m obviously still interested.

I’m not trolling. Yes, it is possible to go into posterior pelvic tilt which isn’t good for your lower back - but honestly, what problems arise from your thoracic spine being too extended? All the shoulder problems seem to originate from having rounded over shoulders.

Based on your previous posts in this thread, bear in mind that a straight lumbar spine is already in posterior pelvic tilt.

As for the thoracic spine, people may have pain from hypokyphosis. My understanding is that a t-spine in hypokyphosis may cause the interlocking surfaces of the vertebrae to rub against each other more than normal, but I never looked into it too closely. Given that they’re posterior to the discs though, I can certainly see more pressure being put on them compared to a normally kyphotic t-spine, where the majority of the weight is on the discs which are better designed to take that pressure.

There may also be breathing issues. This is a very informal demonstration, but take a full breath with your t-spine in a neutral position. Then try to extend your t-spine/push your chest out. You’ll notice the pressure inside your lungs rise. Similarly, note the different amounts of air you can inhale with your t-spine in a neutral vs a hyperextended position. You’re essentially flattening out your ribcage, and while hunching over isn’t great for your breathing, hypokyphosis will also cause problems.

Disclaimer: I am not an orthopedic surgeon. I have, however, played around with my fair share of cadavers in anatomy classes and so on.