T Nation

Speed Skater Sabotages Opponent

[quote]DBCooper wrote:

[quote]stefan128 wrote:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:

[quote]kakno wrote:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:
http://sports.yahoo.com/news/olympics--u-s--speedskater-admits-to-sabotaging-opponent-s-skate--faces-sanctions.html

Personally, I could care less about the cheating. What I want to REALLY know is why the fuck the U.S. team is coached by a South Korean? What is with all of these Olympic sports being coached by non-citizens? The women’s national soccer team was coached by some dyke from Sweden this year. What is with this?

Does anyone else see a major problem with any of this? I’m sure the Japanese or Italian national baseball teams wouldn’t want to have an American coaching their teams.[/quote]
Football teams are coached by foreigners all the time. If you want the best coach, a “no foreigners allowed” policy won’t get you far.[/quote]
I’ll bet there’s plenty of women in the U.S. who could coach that squad to the World Cup title or a Gold Medal. As for the men, who really cares about men’s soccer?[/quote]

How can you not care about men’s soccer, it is one of the most exciting sports on the planet!! Broaden your horizons…[/quote]
You know, every time I hear this from someone it’s as if you blindly assume I’ve never even seen the game before.

I fucking PLAYED it for 11 years and I’ve watched plenty of it. How pompous of a sports fan can you be when you automatically assume that just because someone doesn’t like the sport that you like they must not know anything about it at all. I have broadened my horizons and professional soccer isn’t for me. I find it boring and uninspiring.[/quote]

Didn’t you play soccer as a boy to like 16 yrs old? Hardly the age where top performance is seen.

[quote]imhungry wrote:
[/quote]

There are floppers in every sport like basketball and football which makes it worse since they are in damn near full body armor. Baseball perhaps being the exception but, how much flopping can you do when you stay in the same position for what seems like hours.

[quote]maverick88 wrote:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:

[quote]stefan128 wrote:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:

[quote]kakno wrote:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:
http://sports.yahoo.com/news/olympics--u-s--speedskater-admits-to-sabotaging-opponent-s-skate--faces-sanctions.html

Personally, I could care less about the cheating. What I want to REALLY know is why the fuck the U.S. team is coached by a South Korean? What is with all of these Olympic sports being coached by non-citizens? The women’s national soccer team was coached by some dyke from Sweden this year. What is with this?

Does anyone else see a major problem with any of this? I’m sure the Japanese or Italian national baseball teams wouldn’t want to have an American coaching their teams.[/quote]
Football teams are coached by foreigners all the time. If you want the best coach, a “no foreigners allowed” policy won’t get you far.[/quote]
I’ll bet there’s plenty of women in the U.S. who could coach that squad to the World Cup title or a Gold Medal. As for the men, who really cares about men’s soccer?[/quote]

How can you not care about men’s soccer, it is one of the most exciting sports on the planet!! Broaden your horizons…[/quote]
You know, every time I hear this from someone it’s as if you blindly assume I’ve never even seen the game before.

I fucking PLAYED it for 11 years and I’ve watched plenty of it. How pompous of a sports fan can you be when you automatically assume that just because someone doesn’t like the sport that you like they must not know anything about it at all. I have broadened my horizons and professional soccer isn’t for me. I find it boring and uninspiring.[/quote]

Didn’t you play soccer as a boy to like 16 yrs old? Hardly the age where top performance is seen.
[/quote]
Give me a little bit of credit here, pal. I’ve seen World Cup matches in person and plenty more on TV. I’m a sports fan so I watch the World Cup and some of the Olympic matches when they roll around, but I enjoy the atmosphere and all the peripheral bullshit more than the games themselves. I find them boring to watch at virtually any level. The only level I enjoyed watching the games was when I was coaching a 6 y/o youth team, and that was only because I was much more emotionally-invested in those games.

Give me one good reason why I SHOULD like soccer. And don’t tell me because it’s exciting or whatever. If I asked you why I should like the taste of strawberry pie you wouldn’t say because it tastes good, you’d give me more than that. What the hell can I watch in soccer that I can’t watch being displayed in at least as impressive a manner? The speed? Football features more of it. The athleticism? Basketball has that covered by a long shot. The power? I could see more power on display during a women’s bobsled race. The team game? Football and hockey have that beat by a long shot as well. You see, we have options over here in America and have had them for so long now that soccer simply isn’t going to supplant any of them.

[quote]maverick88 wrote:

[quote]imhungry wrote:
[/quote]

There are floppers in every sport like basketball and football which makes it worse since they are in damn near full body armor. Baseball perhaps being the exception but, how much flopping can you do when you stay in the same position for what seems like hours.[/quote]
Flopping is being legislated out of basketball and I can’t think one single incident where a guy flopped in baseball. Football may see it happen once a year.

Maybe it’s a cultural thing. There’s a LOT more flopping in European basketball and most of the floppers in the NBA are from Europe. In America it just isn’t looked at in the same way. If you weren’t so ignorant and actually broadened your horizons once in a while you’d be more privy to what goes on in cultures other than your own.

You see, Europeans are so used to telling other cultures what to like and how to act and that sort of thing that when a culture has the audacity to go against the grain they flip out. That’s why Europeans get so enraged whenever Americans state with total honesty that they don’t find soccer entertaining and they’d just as soon do without it. They aren’t used to people saying to them, “nah, I don’t think so.” That’s why it’s still popular in most former colonies. THOSE people just laid back and said, “fuck it, we like soccer too I guess”.

This is nothing more than European jealousy about the fact that most Americans don’t seem to have the same awed view of Europe that the rest of the world has traditionally had.

[quote]DBCooper wrote:
And the only reason soccer is so widespread is because England has a long, horrific colonial past and soccer is the one enduring legacy from that which isn’t completely negative in connotation.
[/quote]
pick any one

a)Trolololol much?
b)I guess we can rejoice they didn’t play Baseball?
c)That’s why Pakistan and India rave about Cricket, while Australia and New Z. love Rugby?
d) Understanding sports 101:
Football is the most basic and exciting ballgame the world has come up with.
You just need one ball - and you can pretty much start to kick the ball around.

Rugby cannot be really played in a relaxed and playful manner, American Football is crazily complicated and has no flow at all.
Basketball needs a board and basket and quality pavement and cannot be enjoyed by big groups and there is less dramatic running around involved.
Handball, a sport similar to Basketball, has little to no middlefield-build up and lacks the artistic potential of Baskeball or Football.
Baseball … C’mon - I mean, there’s a pacific island nation whom America had to force with atomic bombs to pretend some enjoyment with Baseball!

The point is -and I don’t like Football at all!- it seems the people’s choice around the world and it doesn’t take a genius to figure out why.

Cooper I think you have some solid points.

I think the most relevant point in today’s world, however, is the cost of the sport. For poor nations (which many were under British rule at one point in time), soccer can be played with 1 ball and is the largest sport in the world. Other sports played around the world, like baseball and basketball, also require minimal equipment. Compare this to 22 sets of football pads, a ball, uprights and the cost to play the game goes up significantly.

[quote]Schwarzfahrer wrote:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:
And the only reason soccer is so widespread is because England has a long, horrific colonial past and soccer is the one enduring legacy from that which isn’t completely negative in connotation.
[/quote]
pick any one

a)Trolololol much?
b)I guess we can rejoice they didn’t play Baseball?
c)That’s why Pakistan and India rave about Cricket, while Australia and New Z. love Rugby?
d) Understanding sports 101:
Football is the most basic and exciting ballgame the world has come up with.
You just need one ball - and you can pretty much start to kick the ball around.

Rugby cannot be really played in a relaxed and playful manner, American Football is crazily complicated and has no flow at all.
Basketball needs a board and basket and quality pavement and cannot be enjoyed by big groups and there is less dramatic running around involved.
Handball, a sport similar to Basketball, has little to no middlefield-build up and lacks the artistic potential of Baskeball or Football.
Baseball … C’mon - I mean, there’s a pacific island nation whom America had to force with atomic bombs to pretend some enjoyment with Baseball!

The point is -and I don’t like Football at all!- it seems the people’s choice around the world and it doesn’t take a genius to figure out why.[/quote]
You want to know why soccer is so popular? You said it yourself. It appeals to countries of virtually any socioeconomic status because all you need is something round and a field to play in.

Great for soccer. But just because it’s a sport that is so simple and cheap to play that starving children in sub-equatorial nations can play it doesn’t make it great at all, and only serves as a further reminder of exactly HOW it became popular. Instead of bringing wealth and prosperity or improved health care to South America, what did Europeans bring? A shitload of diseases and a game that’s cheap as fuck to play.

As for baseball being popular in Japan, they had professional leagues over there for forty years before WWII, so your comparison there is ignorant and invalid.

Yeah, I think we know why soccer is so popular. When you grow up in a society that plays it all the time you naturally are more attracted to it. And when it’s been imposed upon you by the Europeans in between their raping of your women and plundering of your resources, you tend to grow up in a society that is stuck with soccer. Things are further exacerbated because Europeans largely made sure you were so dirt poor that the only sport you could afford to play was soccer anyways.

So after a few generations of this happening all around the globe, it’s only natural that the sport will be so popular worldwide.

[quote]Ripsaw3689 wrote:
Cooper I think you have some solid points.

I think the most relevant point in today’s world, however, is the cost of the sport. For poor nations (which many were under British rule at one point in time), soccer can be played with 1 ball and is the largest sport in the world. Other sports played around the world, like baseball and basketball, also require minimal equipment. Compare this to 22 sets of football pads, a ball, uprights and the cost to play the game goes up significantly. [/quote]
Football only got expensive within the last 50 years. Prior to that the rules were much more conducive to playing without pads.

Look, my point is that just because soccer is popular doesn’t mean shit. Examine WHY it’s popular and it becomes painfully obvious that all the Europeans who proudly tout it as the beautiful game don’t give a shit that their own countries’ atrocious pasts are what’s responsible for this popularity. The sport on its own merit isn’t anything special at all, and I think that’s been proven here in America.

Nope, as I wrote, the attraction of football being a sport with very meager demands is just one half of the reason why it is so popular.

Football has simply, by far, the best game-design for a world sport.

[quote]DBCooper wrote:

[quote]maverick88 wrote:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:

[quote]stefan128 wrote:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:

[quote]kakno wrote:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:
http://sports.yahoo.com/news/olympics--u-s--speedskater-admits-to-sabotaging-opponent-s-skate--faces-sanctions.html

Personally, I could care less about the cheating. What I want to REALLY know is why the fuck the U.S. team is coached by a South Korean? What is with all of these Olympic sports being coached by non-citizens? The women’s national soccer team was coached by some dyke from Sweden this year. What is with this?

Does anyone else see a major problem with any of this? I’m sure the Japanese or Italian national baseball teams wouldn’t want to have an American coaching their teams.[/quote]
Football teams are coached by foreigners all the time. If you want the best coach, a “no foreigners allowed” policy won’t get you far.[/quote]
I’ll bet there’s plenty of women in the U.S. who could coach that squad to the World Cup title or a Gold Medal. As for the men, who really cares about men’s soccer?[/quote]

How can you not care about men’s soccer, it is one of the most exciting sports on the planet!! Broaden your horizons…[/quote]
You know, every time I hear this from someone it’s as if you blindly assume I’ve never even seen the game before.

I fucking PLAYED it for 11 years and I’ve watched plenty of it. How pompous of a sports fan can you be when you automatically assume that just because someone doesn’t like the sport that you like they must not know anything about it at all. I have broadened my horizons and professional soccer isn’t for me. I find it boring and uninspiring.[/quote]

Didn’t you play soccer as a boy to like 16 yrs old? Hardly the age where top performance is seen.
[/quote]
Give me a little bit of credit here, pal. I’ve seen World Cup matches in person and plenty more on TV. I’m a sports fan so I watch the World Cup and some of the Olympic matches when they roll around, but I enjoy the atmosphere and all the peripheral bullshit more than the games themselves. I find them boring to watch at virtually any level. The only level I enjoyed watching the games was when I was coaching a 6 y/o youth team, and that was only because I was much more emotionally-invested in those games.

Give me one good reason why I SHOULD like soccer. And don’t tell me because it’s exciting or whatever. If I asked you why I should like the taste of strawberry pie you wouldn’t say because it tastes good, you’d give me more than that. What the hell can I watch in soccer that I can’t watch being displayed in at least as impressive a manner? The speed? Football features more of it. The athleticism? Basketball has that covered by a long shot. The power? I could see more power on display during a women’s bobsled race. The team game? Football and hockey have that beat by a long shot as well. You see, we have options over here in America and have had them for so long now that soccer simply isn’t going to supplant any of them.[/quote]

I am not saying you should like it, I am saying playing at a higher a level is much different than playing as a kid or teen. Watching is also different, other than the world cup I do not watch soccer but, have played it for as long as I can remember. I absolutely hate watching baseball but, getting a game going at the park or BBQ is always fun.

[quote]maverick88 wrote:

[quote]imhungry wrote:
[/quote]

There are floppers in every sport like basketball and football which makes it worse since they are in damn near full body armor. Baseball perhaps being the exception but, how much flopping can you do when you stay in the same position for what seems like hours.[/quote]

A teammate of mine once hit a one hopper back to the pitcher and faked that it hit off his foot by jumping up and down. It worked!

[quote]DBCooper wrote:

[quote]PB Andy wrote:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:

Does anyone else see a major problem with any of this? I’m sure the Japanese or Italian national baseball teams wouldn’t want to have an American coaching their teams.[/quote]
fyi I’m pretty sure the coach of the Russian basketball team this year was American (in the Olympics).

Regardless, I don’t see the problem. In many sports, Americans simply don’t dominate because coaches lack the knowledge, methodology, technique, whatever it may be, that other foreign coaches have do to the sport being more popular in their country. Take Olympic weightlifting for example. The U.S. blows dick at it and finally USAW was smart enough and brought over Zygmunt Smalcerz, former head coach of the Polish weightlifting teams. That’s OK with me if it makes us better.[/quote]

The problem is that the national teams are supposed to be American athletes representing America, or Brazilian athletes representing Brazil or whatever. So when a foreign coach is representing the country as well it’s just out of place. You represent your country with people who are from it and who live in it for reasons other than because it’s where they coach.

Since a coach is essentially part of the team and it’s okay to have foreigners coaching the national team, why not have foreigners PLAYING on the national team? Like the guy before you said, you won’t get very far in soccer without foreign coaching. Well, for the men, it looks like they’ll never get very far no matter who the coach is without some foreign PLAYERS. If it’s simply about winning then why not start importing non-citizens to play on the national team? Because it isn’t about simply winning; it’s about winning with your own countrymen.

National teams are supposed to be about national pride. It’s supposed to be about what each country is capable of producing on the field in a given sport. By letting coaches from other countries coach, you’re essentially saying that there isn’t anything worthy of representation from your own country and that you cannot produce good coaches, only good athletes.

Why the fuck is the U.S. Olympic team incapable of thriving with an American coach? What is stopping the U.S. national team from using good old-fashioned American know-how and ingenuity to start producing good coaches as well?[/quote]

I don’t see a coach as essentially part of the team. In sports like hockey, football, and soccer, maybe. But in what I always thought of as the more traditional Olympic sports (basically anything that you do, not play; you play hockey, nobody plays wrestling or sprinting or throwing etc etc*) the coach is just a part of the support system for the athlete. If your sport coach needs to be homegrown, what about your strength coach? Your nutritionist? Your therapists/trainers? Does all your equipment need to be produced domestically? Do your training and competition strategies need to be produced domestically?

I can see the point you’re making and I can sympathize with it as someone who takes pride in his country and still dreams of competing for it one day. But at the end of the day, it’s the athletes themselves that have to go out and perform in order to win medals regardless of the support structure they’ve been given, and so that’s where the line has been drawn; the athletes need to be homegrown, but most everything else is fair game. Personally, I don’t have a problem with that.

*This really isn’t the best way to describe the distinction I was going for but I like it so I’m keeping it.

[quote]TheJonty wrote:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:

[quote]PB Andy wrote:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:

[/quote]

I don’t see a coach as essentially part of the team. In sports like hockey, football, and soccer, maybe. But in what I always thought of as the more traditional Olympic sports (basically anything that you do, not play; you play hockey, nobody plays wrestling or sprinting or throwing etc etc*) the coach is just a part of the support system for the athlete. If your sport coach needs to be homegrown, what about your strength coach? Your nutritionist? Your therapists/trainers? Does all your equipment need to be produced domestically? Do your training and competition strategies need to be produced domestically?

I can see the point you’re making and I can sympathize with it as someone who takes pride in his country and still dreams of competing for it one day. But at the end of the day, it’s the athletes themselves that have to go out and perform in order to win medals regardless of the support structure they’ve been given, and so that’s where the line has been drawn; the athletes need to be homegrown, but most everything else is fair game. Personally, I don’t have a problem with that.

*This really isn’t the best way to describe the distinction I was going for but I like it so I’m keeping it.[/quote]

While your distinction is clear enough, it is a semantical distinction at best. I like to think of sports as competitions, and competitors have coaches. If anything, individual competitors rely on their coaches even more than in team sports. In team sports, there’s usually a couple of players who are almost like coaches anyways.

As far trainers go, yes, they should also be from the national team’s country of origin. Equipment doesn’t matter because that is a representation of a company or a brand, not a country.

I think that if you are going to wear the red, white and blue during an international competition, regardless of why you have that official uniform or outfit on, you should be from the country that it represents.

DBLoser:

Your animosity towards the world game; football, is actually getting boring and tiresome. We get it, you played football and you never liked it blablabla.

It makes me laugh that you played and watched the game for 11 years and you hate it so much. Did you just wake up after 11 years and decide you hate the sport you have been playing for so long? When I start a new hobby/sport/pastime, if I dont like it for the first few times I take part in it, then I dont return.

Maybe if you overcame your patriotic ways and allowed coaches from more advanced footballing nations, then maybe you would of been taught some skills and technique and then you wouldnt of been so shit at the game, and you might of enjoyed it. Now and again I meet people who have been playing football for 5-10+ years and they dont even posses the skills of a 6 year old. I understand, its not their fault, football is a culture and one must be brought up and taught properly from a young age to be any good at it.

And your attitude does stink of “Fuck yeah america” and is a bit narrow-minded. Fair enough you think american gridiron is the worlds greatest sport and everyone should play and watch it. Congratulations. Ill send you a bird-certificate. The next time Im at the world cup Ill let the person sitting next to me about your thoughts… I wonder if they will care.

Carry on fool.

tweet tweet

[quote]DBCooper wrote:
Give me one good reason why I SHOULD like soccer. And don’t tell me because it’s exciting or whatever. If I asked you why I should like the taste of strawberry pie you wouldn’t say because it tastes good, you’d give me more than that. What the hell can I watch in soccer that I can’t watch being displayed in at least as impressive a manner? The speed? Football features more of it. The athleticism? Basketball has that covered by a long shot. The power? I could see more power on display during a women’s bobsled race. The team game? Football and hockey have that beat by a long shot as well. You see, we have options over here in America and have had them for so long now that soccer simply isn’t going to supplant any of them.[/quote]

Watch whatever you want to watch, just don’t act like it makes you the only free thinker in a world where conquistadors forced everyone else to play it at musketpoint.

Fuck soccer, football, basketball, tennis all other crap.

There is only one great sport: ROAD CYCLING!

Not entirely serious of course, but road cycling has MANY objective features that are very attractive, when you get to know it. Some of them you will not find in any other sport I think.

[quote]theBird wrote:
DBLoser:

Your animosity towards the world game; football, is actually getting boring and tiresome. We get it, you played football and you never liked it blablabla.

It makes me laugh that you played and watched the game for 11 years and you hate it so much. Did you just wake up after 11 years and decide you hate the sport you have been playing for so long? When I start a new hobby/sport/pastime, if I dont like it for the first few times I take part in it, then I dont return.

Maybe if you overcame your patriotic ways and allowed coaches from more advanced footballing nations, then maybe you would of been taught some skills and technique and then you wouldnt of been so shit at the game, and you might of enjoyed it. Now and again I meet people who have been playing football for 5-10+ years and they dont even posses the skills of a 6 year old. I understand, its not their fault, football is a culture and one must be brought up and taught properly from a young age to be any good at it.

And your attitude does stink of “Fuck yeah america” and is a bit narrow-minded. Fair enough you think american gridiron is the worlds greatest sport and everyone should play and watch it. Congratulations. Ill send you a bird-certificate. The next time Im at the world cup Ill let the person sitting next to me about your thoughts… I wonder if they will care.

Carry on fool.

tweet tweet[/quote]
No, what’s getting tired is your pathetic need to constantly jump to the defense of soccer, as if it’s a personal affront that I don’t like the game. I don’t think everyone should watch and play football or baseball and I’ve never once said that. You almost never hear Americans constantly defending either of those sports to Europeans or Australians. Why? We don’t give a fuck what you think about our sports.

So why are you so emotionally invested in what I think about soccer? Because you ARE emotionally invested.

What’s going on here is that you’re projecting. YOU think everyone should play soccer and immaturely cling to the fact that most of the world plays as evidence that you are right and all of us Americans are fucking backwards. The sport didn’t take in this country. I don’t know why that gets you all bent out of shape.

I’ll have you know that my coaches at the most advanced levels I played at, which were always at a higher level than most kids my age, were not coaches born in America. So I’ve had good coaching if all you think that entails is a non-American. And that’s what is really going on here.

Everyone loves to start bashing America, sorta like all the jealous little girls in the room start snickering and gossiping and ganging up on the one hot chick in the room in an obvious attempt to cast attention away from their own insecurities. So when someone walks in and says even one negative comment about soccer all you infantile little children take it as an opportunity to gang up on me because you and your inferiority complex demand as much.

If there is another reason as to why you seem to continuously follow me around and attack me and everything a nation of more than 300 million stands for simply because we don’t like the same sport as you, please tell me. Because right now it appears as if you’re just a whiny little bitch.

[quote]DBCooper wrote:

[quote]theBird wrote:
DBLoser:

tweet tweet[/quote]
No, what’s getting tired is your pathetic need to constantly jump to the defense of soccer, as if it’s a personal affront that I don’t like the game. I don’t think everyone should watch and play football or baseball and I’ve never once said that. You almost never hear Americans constantly defending either of those sports to Europeans or Australians. Why? We don’t give a fuck what you think about our sports.

So why are you so emotionally invested in what I think about soccer? Because you ARE emotionally invested.

What’s going on here is that you’re projecting. YOU think everyone should play soccer and immaturely cling to the fact that most of the world plays as evidence that you are right and all of us Americans are fucking backwards. The sport didn’t take in this country. I don’t know why that gets you all bent out of shape.

I’ll have you know that my coaches at the most advanced levels I played at, which were always at a higher level than most kids my age, were not coaches born in America. So I’ve had good coaching if all you think that entails is a non-American. And that’s what is really going on here.

Everyone loves to start bashing America, sorta like all the jealous little girls in the room start snickering and gossiping and ganging up on the one hot chick in the room in an obvious attempt to cast attention away from their own insecurities. So when someone walks in and says even one negative comment about soccer all you infantile little children take it as an opportunity to gang up on me because you and your inferiority complex demand as much.

If there is another reason as to why you seem to continuously follow me around and attack me and everything a nation of more than 300 million stands for simply because we don’t like the same sport as you, please tell me. Because right now it appears as if you’re just a whiny little bitch.[/quote]

Smackdown!

Well, as an American, I find rugby (at least southern hemisphere rugby) about the most entertaining sport to watch. And really, all you need is a ball.