T Nation

Soviets on Developing Leg Strength

I just found this and found it very interesting

http://www.sportivnypress.com/documents/SUB_70.html

A study and method done by the Soviets for increasing squat strength in Olympic Lifters. 6 week conjugated cycle with an estimated 5% increase to your max. Anyone seen or tried this cycle before?

Found it on this site:

http://www.sportivnypress.com/English/frames.html

Translation of Soviet studies and methods in Weightlifting.

It is the “Russian Squat” routine, it works very well for increasing your squat, but demands a definite will power to get through it, and lots of stretching, but it worked out well for me and anyone I have seen try it.

Your results may vary. I’m sure those Russian sport scientists really know their shit, but the Russian Squat cycle did nothing for my squat. My legs got a little bigger, my knees hurt all the times, and I got stronger at repping weight. But when the time to take a max single came, I was exactly as strong as before. As an added bonus, my deadlift went down a little from not pulling for several weeks. Other than that- it’s a great program in my opinion.

Seems very hit-or-miss. Artie Drechsler (author of The Weightlifting Encyclopedia) says he’s never seen anyone reap any significant benefits from it.

Are you an Olympic lifter? How do you know your squat is what’s holding your lifts back?

I did a Russian Squat cycle almost identical to the one in the link back in November and put about 10kg on my back squat.

Great find!

i really love reading old studies and old weightlifting manuals and texts, it stems from a desire to understand where coaches have been before so that we can get a handle on where we should be going in the future

The lifter in the second link is Kangasnemi. He was Finnish and was one of the really great ones. One of the very, very few non eatern block athletes the soviets feared.

Excellent technician and also a good presser.

Would be Finlands last world and Euro champion.

Now must scurry off to my books and look up the years.

Thanks for the link, great memories.

[quote]Sneaky weasel wrote:
Are you an Olympic lifter? How do you know your squat is what’s holding your lifts back?[/quote]

Yes indeed.

haha, no my squat is not holding my lifts back. I just thought I’d post this to show the crowd and provide some much needed info on O lifting on this board.

Gotcha, sorry for jumping to conclusions.

[quote]Sneaky weasel wrote:
Gotcha, sorry for jumping to conclusions. [/quote]

No worries.

on a side note found this little gem:

http://www.dynamic-eleiko.com/sportivny/library/farticles004.html

kinda like additional notes to the program I originally posted.

really cool analysis on when and why to employ this program. Goes in depth into how technique in the clean trumps leg strength developed by the back squat using the training results of several world champs.

sorry if I’m spamming the boards with this O lifting stuff haha.

haha nooo…bring on more olympic lifting spam!!!

[quote]Invictica wrote:
Sneaky weasel wrote:
Gotcha, sorry for jumping to conclusions.

No worries.

on a side note found this little gem:

http://www.dynamic-eleiko.com/sportivny/library/farticles004.html

kinda like additional notes to the program I originally posted.

really cool analysis on when and why to employ this program. Goes in depth into how technique in the clean trumps leg strength developed by the back squat using the training results of several world champs.

sorry if I’m spamming the boards with this O lifting stuff haha. [/quote]

This was definitely my intended point. I feel like it’s almost always more productive to assume that missed lifts are a product of technical errors than insufficient strength. Strength without excellent technique does more harm than good.

[quote]Sneaky weasel wrote:
Invictica wrote:
Sneaky weasel wrote:
Gotcha, sorry for jumping to conclusions.

No worries.

on a side note found this little gem:

http://www.dynamic-eleiko.com/sportivny/library/farticles004.html

kinda like additional notes to the program I originally posted.

really cool analysis on when and why to employ this program. Goes in depth into how technique in the clean trumps leg strength developed by the back squat using the training results of several world champs.

sorry if I’m spamming the boards with this O lifting stuff haha.

This was definitely my intended point. I feel like it’s almost always more productive to assume that missed lifts are a product of technical errors than insufficient strength. Strength without excellent technique does more harm than good.[/quote]

does it ever.

pull the bar as high as the sky, too bad it’s 6 inches in front.

-chris

THe program actually is used in “A Program of Multi Year Training” with a few slight modifications. The program is embedded in the normal weightlifting program and because of this excludes a couple of the 80%6x2 days, and the last day is the 100% 2x2. I was able to complete the program along with the weightlifting training included and got 100% for 2, 1, 1. I never tested my max afterward, my squat is nearly 150% of my clean and jerk as it is. It definitely makes you stronger although I also hurt my back doing 90%4x4.

Cool. Have you been following the programming laid out in that book? As I recall, the first year or two only has the exercise selection, and no prescriptions for set/rep or volume. Did you get around this somehow, or did you just jump in at year 3?

I calculated my classification based on the Siff Score Excel files that can be found online and I’m class 2 (year 4), which they have an exact program written out for. I followed it for awhile and worked out some technqiue flaws so I’m now restarting the Class 2 program and am going to follow it exactly minus the transition stage.