T Nation

Sots Press, Savickas Press, Klokov Press from Squat


#1

I've been toying with these for the last few weeks and already see a lot of improvement in my mobility and pressing form (on standing presses and push presses). I would like to do this stuff wisely though, so:

What is the best strategy to use these? Should they be treated mostly as mobility/stability drills or should one actively try to get stronger on these?
What would be the preferred rep range and rep style? Should every rep be done from dead start (bar resting on shoulders/traps)?


#2

[quote]SirValeq wrote:
I’ve been toying with these for the last few weeks and already see a lot of improvement in my mobility and pressing form (on standing presses and push presses). I would like to do this stuff wisely though, so:

What is the best strategy to use these? Should they be treated mostly as mobility/stability drills or should one actively try to get stronger on these?
What would be the preferred rep range and rep style? Should every rep be done from dead start (bar resting on shoulders/traps)?
[/quote]

Just some precision for those who do not know about these movements:

Sots press: Named after Viktor Sots who was a heavyweight Olympic lifter (old 100 or 110kg class). His “claim to fame” is to be the first “big” lifter to use the squat jerk. He invented the “Sots press”, which is shoulder press done from the bottom of a front squat, first to improve his shoulder mobility in the squat jerk. But he eventually became very strong in this movement doing 160kg for 3 reps and 170kg for one. NOTE: lot of people use the name “Sots press” to describe any shoulder press done in a full squat position, including a behind the neck press done in a squat. In reality a Sots press only refers to a press done from the bottom position of a front squat/clean. To nm this is the ultimate test of shoulder, thoracic and hip mobility.

Savickas press: Named after strongman Zydrunas Savickas, it’s a shoulder press done seated on the floor, with the legs fully extended in front of you. It requires a bit less shoulder/thoracic mobility than the Sots press but is a very good exercise to build core strength.

Snatch press from squat: What you refer to as a “Klokov press” is simply called a “snatch press from squat” and has been a staple exercise in Russian/Soviet programs since forever. So naming it a Klokov press would not be correct (although in our modern age naming a lift after a popular lifter enhance the coolness and desirability of said lift). It’s an exercise that I personally preform quite often. Very good test of shoulder, thoracic and hip mobility but that is more easily doable than the Sots press.

I believe that the first use of these exercises is to develop shoulder, thoracic and hip mobility. At first these will be the limiting factor of the movements. But as these improve you will become able to use more and more weight.

So at first the goal should be to improve form on these lifts but once mobility is optimal your goal should be, like with any big lift, to become stronger. But don’t rush it.

I personally stick to sets of 5 reps or less.


#3

Thank you, CT. I certainly won’t rush it, but it is nice to know that it’s safe to try to get stronger on those.

To be honest, I think I’ve already seen some envy in all the huge guys’ eyes when I do these lifts, even if I use very light weights (20-40kg). I guess many people wish they had started doing mobility work earlier in their lives and now think it’s too late for them to improve.


#4

I had one of my athlete do the following complex as a warm-up for her lifting session. Worked up to 85lbs for 2+2+2


#5

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
I had one of my athlete do the following complex as a warm-up for her lifting session. Worked up to 85lbs for 2+2+2
[/quote]
Nice one. I’ll try combining the lifts into complexes once I’m comfortable enough with them.