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Soreness From Deads

I’ve been doing Deads now for about 3 months, and I’ve gone from 145 to doing 325 now (for triples) and notice that I have a bit of soreness in my lower back. Its not pain and doesn’t bother me much, but I was just wondering if I’m supposed to have this soreness?

To clarify, its not pain, but more of a soreness like I feel in my legs also after deads. Will this eventually go away as I strengthen my lower back, or am I doing something wrong here?

My words of wisdom to you:

As you progress, the pain and soreness will not diminish. You’ll simply be lifting heavier weights.

[quote]Mutu wrote:
I’ve been doing Deads now for about 3 months, and I’ve gone from 145 to doing 325 now (for triples) and notice that I have a bit of soreness in my lower back. Its not pain and doesn’t bother me much, but I was just wondering if I’m supposed to have this soreness?

To clarify, its not pain, but more of a soreness like I feel in my legs also after deads. Will this eventually go away as I strengthen my lower back, or am I doing something wrong here?

[/quote]

You’ve gone up in weight fast. There are a lot of ligaments and tendons that tie the spine to the pelvis. It is my opinion that muscles can sometimes strengthen faster than the connective tissue and this may cause injury. Just be careful with increases until you are sure your back can take it

[quote]Razorslim wrote:
You’ve gone up in weight fast. There are a lot of ligaments and tendons that tie the spine to the pelvis. It is my opinion that muscles can sometimes strengthen faster than the connective tissue and this may cause injury. Just be careful with increases until you are sure your back can take it[/quote]

I would add very fast. Your first time dead lifting? It’s hard for me to imagine such an increase without your technique taking a hit. Check that. Did you do any deloading in those 3 months? You should have.

Lay off the heavy deads for a bit and do some complimentary work for the core and posterior chain. Do some unilateral work, like dumbbell deads from the side etc.

[quote]Mr. Chen wrote:
Razorslim wrote:
You’ve gone up in weight fast. There are a lot of ligaments and tendons that tie the spine to the pelvis. It is my opinion that muscles can sometimes strengthen faster than the connective tissue and this may cause injury. Just be careful with increases until you are sure your back can take it

I would add very fast. Your first time dead lifting? It’s hard for me to imagine such an increase without your technique taking a hit. Check that. Did you do any deloading in those 3 months? You should have.

Lay off the heavy deads for a bit and do some complimentary work for the core and posterior chain. Do some unilateral work, like dumbbell deads from the side etc.[/quote]

I went from deadlifting 0 pounds to 335 in the span of 3 months. What’s the big deal? I started slowly and focused on form and used low weights, then I just loaded it up as the weeks went on.

Same with the squat. 3 months ago? 0 pounds. Today, 265.

[quote]dhuge67 wrote:
Mr. Chen wrote:
Razorslim wrote:
You’ve gone up in weight fast. There are a lot of ligaments and tendons that tie the spine to the pelvis. It is my opinion that muscles can sometimes strengthen faster than the connective tissue and this may cause injury. Just be careful with increases until you are sure your back can take it

I would add very fast. Your first time dead lifting? It’s hard for me to imagine such an increase without your technique taking a hit. Check that. Did you do any deloading in those 3 months? You should have.

Lay off the heavy deads for a bit and do some complimentary work for the core and posterior chain. Do some unilateral work, like dumbbell deads from the side etc.

I went from deadlifting 0 pounds to 335 in the span of 3 months. What’s the big deal? I started slowly and focused on form and used low weights, then I just loaded it up as the weeks went on.

Same with the squat. 3 months ago? 0 pounds. Today, 265.[/quote]

Well, it might not be a big deal. Perhaps you are genetically very sturdy, and naturally strong. The spine is the most complicated joint structure in your body, and the most prone to injury. I am just suggesting caution. The dangers that Razor mentioned above are real, and you won’t feel anything until the damage is done. In my mind, progressing that fast has a definite risk to it, that I see no need to take.

I get sore, no doubt about it. I know that I’m not injuring myself though. I am still able to run and thus am not experience mobility-hampering pain. I am naturally peasant-stock Italian-strong, so that may explain my particular case. haha!

As others have said that seems to be a very quick increase in the amount of weight over three months. What were your squat numbers like before starting deads? If they were good I could possibly believe that you have the leg strength to progress deadlifts that quickly.

One thing to note about deadlifts is that when you reach the limits of your strength and are not being careful about using correct form the lower back tends to take over from the glutes and hamstrings so that you can lift the weight.

Get someone to check your form from the side as you lift near your max, are your hips rising faster than your shoulders? If they are then you putting yourself in the position where you are using your lower back to lift ( more like a stiff leg deadlift) rather than your legs. This is not good, and as you go even heavier you will be more susceptible to injury especially if as others have mentioned your ligaments and tendons aren’t up to scratch compared to the muscles.

The fact that you are feeling soreness in the lower back indicates that this may be the problem you are facing. You should feel soreness in your legs and upper back. Leave lower back soreness for the day after good mornings and back extenstions!

Hope this helps,

Ben

At 18yrs old, I went from no squatting (my high school weight room didn’t have a rack, to squatting 325lbs in 6 months in college. I was 5’5 132lbs at the time. My form was right on. But, I relied on a belt, and did no auxiliary work, except back extensions.

Now, at 45yrs old, my goal is to be able to squat 150lbs. I have no condition that appears on any imaging scan, so what did I do? I have concluded I went up too fast for one. I would hate to see any young guy make the same mistake, when thoughtful training could prevent it.

Some of those lower back muscles can take up to 100hrs to recover. If you’re squatting heavy and DLing every week they never have a chance to recover.

My advice (having dealt with the same issue)would be to work in a light day or take some time off until the soreness goes away.

My lower back is killing me next day. I always have rough soreness for 2 days and very light on 3rd after that it is gone. I have scheduled my deadlift on Friday and weekends off, so it could recover and wouldn’t bother my training. I have no idea why it is so sore… I stretch my lower back every time and it doesn’t matter if I do sets of 8 or 5.

[quote]Mutu wrote:
I’ve been doing Deads now for about 3 months, and I’ve gone from 145 to doing 325 now (for triples) and notice that I have a bit of soreness in my lower back. Its not pain and doesn’t bother me much, but I was just wondering if I’m supposed to have this soreness?

To clarify, its not pain, but more of a soreness like I feel in my legs also after deads. Will this eventually go away as I strengthen my lower back, or am I doing something wrong here?

[/quote]

I see nothing wrong with such a fast increase in weight. Much of that increase will have come from improving your technique. I have been training the deadlift hard for 3 months. Day 1: 135 felt tough…i was all over the place. Hit 400 earlier this week. I did that through a combination of improving my technique and hitting the correct supplemental exercises.

I must say i feel very little in my lower back during or after my deadlift sessions. I have noted my upper back needs particular attention and have adjusted my program to incorporate more rows.

Your weakest link may be your lower back. In which case, seek to strenghten it with back extensions, reverse hypers etc. (You will only ever be as strong as your weakest bodypart).

The pain you experience sounds like muscle tiredness, so you may be doing too much deadlifting or too many reps at too high an intensity.

Either way, strengthen the lower back and ask yourself if your program is sound from any intensity and volume perspective. Read everything by Louie Simmons to help you to figure this out.

Thanks for all the advice guys.

The consensus seems to be: Incorporate lighter training days, focus on proper technique, and do supplemental exercises.

For this week I’ll try to go lighter and do higher reps, using 245.

Also for supplemental exercises, what would be some good suggestions? I’m thinking of back extensions, stiff legged deads, and hypers.

And I noticed someone asked if I squat, and I do, though I only use the machine squat due to personal preference.

[quote]Mutu wrote:

And I noticed someone asked if I squat, and I do, though I only use the machine squat due to personal preference. [/quote]

right there is your problem.

Id have to agree take a deload week and stay at that weight for 2 weeks then keep on progressing.
Also how frequently are you deadlifting in a week?

[quote]Mr. Chen wrote:
dhuge67 wrote:
Mr. Chen wrote:
Razorslim wrote:
You’ve gone up in weight fast. There are a lot of ligaments and tendons that tie the spine to the pelvis. It is my opinion that muscles can sometimes strengthen faster than the connective tissue and this may cause injury. Just be careful with increases until you are sure your back can take it

I would add very fast. Your first time dead lifting? It’s hard for me to imagine such an increase without your technique taking a hit. Check that. Did you do any deloading in those 3 months? You should have.

Lay off the heavy deads for a bit and do some complimentary work for the core and posterior chain. Do some unilateral work, like dumbbell deads from the side etc.

I went from deadlifting 0 pounds to 335 in the span of 3 months. What’s the big deal? I started slowly and focused on form and used low weights, then I just loaded it up as the weeks went on.

Same with the squat. 3 months ago? 0 pounds. Today, 265.

Well, it might not be a big deal. Perhaps you are genetically very sturdy, and naturally strong. The spine is the most complicated joint structure in your body, and the most prone to injury. I am just suggesting caution. The dangers that Razor mentioned above are real, and you won’t feel anything until the damage is done. In my mind, progressing that fast has a definite risk to it, that I see no need to take.[/quote]

Yeaaaa I know machine squats aren’t as beneficial, but its a comfort thing. I’m starting front squats (barbell) soon as I get my form down since I plan on going for reps at 135 (and slowly progressing). I also do split squats with dumbbells.

As for frequency, I’m only deadlifting once a week.

[quote]Mutu wrote:
Yeaaaa I know machine squats aren’t as beneficial, but its a comfort thing. I’m starting front squats (barbell) soon as I get my form down since I plan on going for reps at 135 (and slowly progressing). I also do split squats with dumbbells.

As for frequency, I’m only deadlifting once a week.[/quote]

But, you are also squatting which is also low back intensive. This would be too much for me personally. If I’m dead lifting, I am only doing one-legged stuff that week. If I squat, I only do auxiliary lower back work that week.

Alot of coaches would say you want to lift as hard as you can without getting sore. The coaches that say this are power oriented not bodybuilding types. I think it is possible for you to get that strong that fast.

When I first started doing deads I would get fatigued doing 95 and couldnt keep form on much heavier. I made it up to 315 pretty quickly also. As for the lower back soreness I never really experienced that much at all.

Remember, your legs will never be the limiting factor in breaking the bar off the floor, thats the reason many people consider this a back exercise first. I would take some weeks where you back off and dont come near your max, and dont push the reps too much either. Say if you max at 325, dont go above 275 or so and only do 3 reps per set.

[quote]Mutu wrote:
Yeaaaa I know machine squats aren’t as beneficial, but its a comfort thing. I’m starting front squats (barbell) soon as I get my form down since I plan on going for reps at 135 (and slowly progressing). I also do split squats with dumbbells.

As for frequency, I’m only deadlifting once a week.[/quote]
Managing your recovery is going to become more important as you increase the weight. Just keep that in mind.

The deadlift will take a lot out of you. Typical three day per week squat programs have one day per week doing deadlifts working up to a heavy set of five. It sounds like you are following similar guidelines.

If this is true and your performance decreases or your lower back is constantly zaped it may be time to reduce your squat training to have at least one lighter training day per week

Supplemental exercises? All the things you listed keep hitting your lower back. Think more recovery for your lower back, not more stress. Strengthen your ‘abs’ in addition to your lower back. I’d add weighted sit-ups and side bends before those other things.

If you really want to add additional lower back work, switch away from machine squats to barbell squats at least one day a week.

[quote]Shadowzz4 wrote:
I would take some weeks where you back off and dont come near your max, and dont push the reps too much either. Say if you max at 325, dont go above 275 or so and only do 3 reps per set. [/quote]

I agree with this. After three months of rapid progress you really could take a low volume, less intense training week. This will help you recover and continue to progress in your training. In your case that progression should be adding barbell squats into the program before anything else.