T Nation

Sony's OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) TV

I recently say this on the Sony website, and wondered if anyone else heard or knew about it?

I haven’t seen it before, but that thing looks sweet. 3mm thick? Unreal.

PS- Fight on!

OLED’s are suppose to be the T.V’s of tomorrow, with instant response time and unbeatable contrast levels. But $2,500 for a 12inch television, no thanks. Definitly going to have to wait a while for their prices to go WAY down.

[quote]elusive wrote:
OLED’s are suppose to be the T.V’s of tomorrow, with instant response time and unbeatable contrast levels. But $2,500 for a 12inch television, no thanks. Definitly going to have to wait a while for their prices to go WAY down.[/quote]

That’s the part I had to keep double checking. I kept thinking the dimensions were a misprint. I understand it’s a new technology, but 12"? For $2,500?

It’s definitely cool though. It will be interesting to see what happens with this in the future as the size increases and hopefully the prices become competitive.

I read about OLEDs about 4 years ago as the tv of the future. For a while, I held off buying an LCD because of it. It’s like any other technology in that it is possible long before it is feasible or makes any sense for the average buyer to get it. I’m sure as soon as they start to come down in price to where they’re reasonable, there will be another breakthrough on the horizon - like invisibility suits.

DB

The dimensions givin in the specs do this thing no justice as to how tiny it is…its freakishly tiny. You would never think how small a 12 inch tv is…
but its absolutly amazing to see in person.

look for a sony style store near you and go check it out.

Let’s get a few things straight: OLEDs are way superior to regular LEDs in terms of luminosity, viewing angle, energy consumption, how vivid the colors are, etc. And I mean way superior. But there are still bugs to sort out when building TVs. Among other issues, individual cells must be tightly encapsulated. The first OLED was made in the mid-90s.

Dollarbill, it would be unfair to expect the industry to mature production processes in such a short time. For comparison, LCD technology has been around for many decades. Take my word for it, OLEDs are not vaporware. They’re here, and they’re here to stay. Indium is running out in case you didn’t know, and the current LCD consumption trend is evidently unsustainable.

And if you don’t want to take my word for it, just check out the thousands of products coming of Chinese factories with OLEDs. They’re cheaper to manufacture and consume less power. Therefore, people are using them.

What you have to understand, is that TVs by today’s standards are expected to have certain color contrast ratios which OLEDs aren’t really giving in bulk (you can tweak them, but that defeats flow production).

This thing from Sony is a little marvel, but it’s nothing more than a proof-of-concept. If you inspect it closely, you can see that the driving circuitry is still in silicon and that makes the bulky base which (for me) defeats the purpose of having an extremely think display. In fact, Sony is selling these things at a loss. It’s just to polish their recently tarnished image among geeks.

In any case, there are plenty of other prototypes from all major TV manufactures to look at. If I’m not mistaken, Samsung showed a 40 inch OLED-TV last year.

In short, the OLED manufacturing process isn’t quite mature to produce TVs at prices that could compete with LCDs, but we’re getting there. Meanwhile, these things will probably take over many aspects of our daily lives (from monochromatic displays to lighting) before every one of us can get his own TV of the future.

If I were to throw in a number, I’d say that by 2020, OLEDs would have completely offset LCDs in terms of production. Stay tuned…

[quote]lixy wrote:

This thing from Sony is a little marvel, but it’s nothing more than a proof-of-concept. If you inspect it closely, you can see that the driving circuitry is still in silicon and that makes the bulky base which (for me) defeats the purpose of having an extremely think display. In fact, Sony is selling these things at a loss. It’s just to polish their recently tarnished image among geeks.

[/quote]

That tiny TV did seem a bit strange being attached to the size base that it was.

Its a shame that audiophiles hate sony so much, I like my sony equipment and have never had a problem.


Here is the Samsung.

I was going to wait for these to hit the market, but it was unrealistic to expect them to be at this size for a reasonable price so I bought an LCD.

My little mp3 player has one of these and the quality is superb - I think the contrast ratio is 1000000:1.

At the moment, I’d be concerned about how it handles changes in humidity and pressure.

I’m sure those issues (if they are there to begin with) will be non-existant by the time we get one.

[quote]Vash wrote:
At the moment, I’d be concerned about how it handles changes in humidity and pressure.[/quote]

Remarkably well. There have been reports of people splashing it with water and it didn’t budge.

[quote]rsg wrote:
Here is the Samsung.

I was going to wait for these to hit the market, but it was unrealistic to expect them to be at this size for a reasonable price so I bought an LCD.

My little mp3 player has one of these and the quality is superb - I think the contrast ratio is 1000000:1.[/quote]

For some reason that picture reminds me of that scene from Sabrina where Harrison Ford was whacking a flat screen with a crowbar to prove how durable it was.