T Nation

Some Thoughts on the 4th

  For those of us that take the time on the birth of our nation to look back on our history rather than the impending hamburgers and fireworks, a singular thought strikes us all at one time or another:  Our founders would be disappointed in what this country has become.  Collectively this is most certainly true, though parts remain in which the founders could take great pride.  Hamilton would relish in American might and global reach and Jefferson would take delight in the expansion of equality within us.  

Too often though, when we bow our heads in sorrow at the thought of squandered liberty we leave our heads low and continue down the path that has taken us to the prison we find ourselves in. It is still a large prison no doubt, but it is much smaller than our fathers�?? prison and smaller still than the prison of our grandfathers. Where then will our sons and daughters sleep? Upon this path we tread our grandchildren will find themselves in cages not fit for dogs! Weep then fellow citizen, but weep not for squandered freedom; instead spare your tears for the cowards among us, or perhaps more accurately, the cowards within us.

In 1774 John Adams wrote in his journal, �??We have not men fit for the times. We are deficient in genius, in education, in travel, in fortune, in everything. I feel unutterable anxiety.�?? This too is a sentiment I am sure that we have all felt at one time or another. In an era of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Alexander Hamilton, and Samuel Adams just to name a few, John Adams felt that there not men fit for the times! America�??s heroes were but ordinary men, the majority of which arrived just as they were needed while idling away in private affairs until duty called. So too will it be with us.

Now to ask the more pressing question. Would our founders be disappointed in you? What have you done in the name of liberty? Do you make your voice heard? Do you even know all ten amendments to the Bill of Rights? What about your children? Have you voted for someone you know has violated those rights? Do you own a military pattern rifle? Do you train with it? When did you last crack a history book? Did you vote for a smoking ban in your state? Have you quietly sat by when a seatbelt law was passed?

Do not stand idle in the face of the tyrant. Make a stand, if only a small one in the name of liberty. Otherwise brand yourself a coward, a toadie to the tyrant, or both. That way I can put my trust in hands more deserving of it. Take a stand, the heroes are around us. They need only be prodded. Awaken your righteous nature and rescue your country with your pen before better men are forced to do it with their guns. If you cannot do that, then their blood will be on your hands too.

mike

I like that little passage, very interesting. I find myself always thinking on July 4th every year, while it may still entail going out tonight and drinking and setting off fireworks, I genuinely give it deep thought.

You look at all the holidays we have every year, and we make huge deals over things like Halloween, Christmas, and Easter, when these are not based on a genesis of something factual neccessarily. I am NOT slamming anybody’s religious beliefs, I’m just saying none of you can say whether or not their origins are of absolute truth I could care less what anybody believes in. Halloween is really just a fun and pointless one, but anyway…

July 4th is a day to celebrate our independence, how our great nation came to be exactly that; a nation, not colony of the motherland. I think it’s a day that should be the most important to all of us that live in America, where we should think about our roots, what this nation stands for, and what it has become, and to try to determine most importantly how to revitalize the once great sense of patriotism that seems to have been lost. God bless America!

[quote]MisterAmazing wrote:

July 4th is a day to celebrate our independence, how our great nation came to be exactly that; a nation, not colony of the motherland. I think it’s a day that should be the most important to all of us that live in America, where we should think about our roots, what this nation stands for, and what it has become, and to try to determine most importantly how to revitalize the once great sense of patriotism that seems to have been lost. God bless America!

[/quote]

It is the day your Founding Fathers revolted because 1-2,5% of taxes seemed to be unbearable.

Could you live with it now?

[quote]orion wrote:

It is the day your Founding Fathers revolted because 1-2,5% of taxes seemed to be unbearable.

Could you live with it now?

[/quote]

Could I live with taxes without any form of representation?

[quote]SouthernBrew wrote:
orion wrote:

It is the day your Founding Fathers revolted because 1-2,5% of taxes seemed to be unbearable.

Could you live with it now?

Could I live with taxes without any form of representation?[/quote]

With only 2% taxes, I could live without any kind of kind of representation whatsoever!

[quote]orion wrote:
SouthernBrew wrote:
orion wrote:

It is the day your Founding Fathers revolted because 1-2,5% of taxes seemed to be unbearable.

Could you live with it now?

Could I live with taxes without any form of representation?

With only 2% taxes, I could live without any kind of kind of representation whatsoever!
[/quote]

Even when the government had permanent and transferable warrants giving them freedom to hassle you or anyone else with no check on their power?

Not to mention the government was raising taxes, enacting laws that began to crush your economy…

[quote]SouthernBrew wrote:
orion wrote:
SouthernBrew wrote:
orion wrote:

It is the day your Founding Fathers revolted because 1-2,5% of taxes seemed to be unbearable.

Could you live with it now?

Could I live with taxes without any form of representation?

With only 2% taxes, I could live without any kind of kind of representation whatsoever!

Even when the government had permanent and transferable warrants giving them freedom to hassle you or anyone else with no check on their power?

Not to mention the government was raising taxes, enacting laws that began to crush your economy…[/quote]

Raising taxes is unfair, but as long as they have only 2% in taxes, how much damage can they actually do?

[quote]orion wrote:
Raising taxes is unfair, but as long as they have only 2% in taxes, how much damage can they actually do?

[/quote]

It wasn’t the taxes as much as the control

[quote]SouthernBrew wrote:
orion wrote:
Raising taxes is unfair, but as long as they have only 2% in taxes, how much damage can they actually do?

It wasn’t the taxes as much as the control[/quote]

That was the point.

How much can you control with 2% of the GDP?

You can legislate until the cows come home, but with no resources to enforce your laws you might have to stick to the basics.

Colonist’s were actually represented quite well in Parliament. It wasn’t the taxes, the economic control, or the supposed lack of representation that caused the revolution.

Sure, these were things that were used to inspire lowly farmers to take up arms against the greatest military in the world, but the real reason lay in the very few who actually wanted independence. The Sons of Liberty, and other organizations, just felt that 3000 miles of ocean should be enough to separate two different nations. The fact that Britain was preventing colonists from expanding (Declaration Line after F+I War), along with the intolerable acts made these fine minds crave a new country.

Products of the enlightenment, they created a new nation not only to break away from Britain (whom many of them didn’t dislike at all), but to begin an experiment in democracy and capitalism.

[quote]Beowolf wrote:
Colonist’s were actually represented quite well in Parliament. It wasn’t the taxes, the economic control, or the supposed lack of representation that caused the revolution.
[/quote]

Please back this up. Where did you come up with this info? I’m genuinely curious.

mike

I like to call the 4th of July “Hillbilly Christmas”. Bunch of drunk yahoos letting their six year olds set off fireworks in the backyard until 4:00 AM. Brilliant. Then, most holidays in the country are just an excuse for your average slob to get fucked up 'cause he’s off work for a few days.

[quote]orion wrote:
MisterAmazing wrote:

July 4th is a day to celebrate our independence, how our great nation came to be exactly that; a nation, not colony of the motherland. I think it’s a day that should be the most important to all of us that live in America, where we should think about our roots, what this nation stands for, and what it has become, and to try to determine most importantly how to revitalize the once great sense of patriotism that seems to have been lost. God bless America!

It is the day your Founding Fathers revolted because 1-2,5% of taxes seemed to be unbearable.

Could you live with it now?

[/quote]

Taxes were a rallying point, much like claiming Saddam had WMD’s gave Bush the support to invade Iraq at one point in time. classic propaganda.

The forefathers were fighting for liberty, equality, soveriegnty and seperation of church and state.

At the time of the revolution, the western world was coming out of the dark ages, ruled by the catholic church and it’s inquisitions, dominance fueled by intimidation and ignorance, witch burnings, heavy handed kings deriving unchallengeable authority by divine right and so on.

The forefathers, many of whom were members of a group proclaiming ideals that were to become american, fought to end tyranny with an army raised out of a population fed up with taxes.

This is why the bill of rights concentrates so much on checks and balances in a gov’t, making the gov’t the people’s gov’t and giving people basic human rights with relatively little mention of taxes.

if taxes were really the issue, they would have been more of a focal piece in the drafting of this country’s laws.