T Nation

Soccer is where the money is at


#1

and I thought there was money in baseball, basketball, and American football facility names. we be poor!

http://sports.yahoo.com/soccer/blog/dirty-tackle/post/Richest-club-in-the-world-signs-richest-sponsors?urn=sow-wp3142


#2

True that... soccer is where its at. Buncha over-payed, skinny, pretty-boys.

I don't mind the game, but man - there's got to be a limit. That's way too much cash to be running around chasing a ball for 90minutes.


#3

mmmmmhhmmmmmmm


#4

Yeah, too bad you have to prance around on the pitch like a fucking Nancy and hurl yourself to the ground in pain in a manner that would get you instant acceptance to the Actors' Studio every time someone comes within a foot of you. I guess now we know what the price of dignity on the other side of the pond is.


#5

The company that agreed to pay such an outrages sum is supposedly owned by the owner's (futbal team) brother. The deal would be a loophole around the new fair play rule that would cripple the teams' spending ability. The new rule has a required club profit:spending ratio, and this team has been inflating the market by overpaying for players while in the red for awhile now. So while it looks like a large some of money, it is the owner's family money being deposited into the club bank account in an attempt to continue purchasing players.


#6

You're just butthurt because A-League bloopers video is the funniest thing of the year.

Soccer is the most popular sport around the world and the World Cup has more relative viewers than the Olympic Games, so it's natural that the money goes there. Now, I agree that the salaries are overboard and many teams are going bankrupt because they have been living above their possibilities and now banks don't give loans so easily.

This Manchester City deal is nasty because it's a favour of a friend to another friend. What a coincidence that Manchester City wouldn't have been able to compete in Europe next season due to the economical fairplay rule and now gets stadium sponsorship for a value that covers the expected expenses of the season.

The bubble will explode sooner or later and the entire sport will need a reset when it comes to salaries.


#7

Ha, this coming from a Man U fan! I would have truly been surprised if you didn't have anything bad to say about City. Over inflated salaries are problem in most major sports leagues around the world like the NBA and NFL, hence the reason those two leagues are in the middle of work stoppages (lockouts) - and European football is no different. But bashing City for "inflating the market" is kind of ignorant especially when your precious Man U, along with most of the top competition in the Premier League have been doing it for god-knows how long and part of the reason it's a problem today.


#8

What are 'relative viewers'?

Serious question.


#9

I don't really know the exact English word, but in the World Cup you have 90 (plus half-time, extra time, etc.) minutes of action twice a day, while in the Olympic Games you have hours and hours of running sports, which include basketball and rowing, so some calculation is made.

I can't find more data on it (which is a shame), but the Athens Olympic Games opening and closing had 95-130 millions viewers, while World Cup final of 2006 had almost 800 millions.


#10

ratio of population of countries involved to amount of people who actually watch it in the countries involved?


#11

Stop watching the edited highlights of Serie A and La Liga and watch football in the premiership. It's far more brutal.


#12

I like the low scores and the frequent nil all draws. Exciting stuff. Good to see a concessive brain injury there too.


#13

I don't see why there has to be this big argument about football not being physical and tough. Sure the modern day game lacks the physicality of yesteryear at times, but it far exceeds it in terms of the skill level.
If you enjoy the physical, combative, violent side of sport then there are far better options out there. People who complain that football is a pussy sport are like people who choose to eat salad then complain because it was all vegetables.
If you want a sport that has more impacts etc. then watch one. But don't watch a sport and then complain about it not having something that isn't inherently part of it anyway.


#14

In the same way I can't stand dumb-ass redneck "footbaw" fanatics, the same goes for overzealous soccer fans.

I know 2 people who literally become inconsolable when the season ends, and damn near go into a deep depression. And these people don't even play. They just WATCH it on TV!


#15

I don't play or watch football (swim and play rugby when I'm not too injured). But it is a tough sport - saying it's not is like me saying that American Football is easier than rugby because you're all wearing sissy padding :stuck_out_tongue:


#16

You don't play or watch soccer, yet you feel that you're qualified to assess how tough a sport it is? What a fucking dumbass. I swear to God, there seems to have been a huge influx of braindead nonentities on this site in the last six months.


#17

Soccer aint that easy, you know. Sure, you dont some special physical strength, but damn, the endurance, the fast thinking you have to make, the reflexes you must own in order to make that pass just the right time...It aint easy at all...


#18

he may not be qualified, but he's right, anyhow. soccer is a tough fucking sport. change of speed all the time, change of direction, reflexes, lots of collisions w/ body parts, etc. it has the highest injury rate of all sports for a reason. and it just wears you the fuck out, you are walking and sprinting for 90+ fucking minutes.


#19

You're right. It is tough, but not in the sense that NFL or rugby etc are tough. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the average NFL career is about 4 seasons. Careers of 15+ years are not uncommon in football.


#20

I'm one of those dumbasses DB mentions that has never played soccer but holds and expresses opinions about the sport. Injury rate comparison between rugby and soccer:

'Comparison of the incidence of soccer and rugby injuries indicated that rugby union football was associated with a significantly higher rate of injury than soccer. The differences were pronounced for contact injuries, injuries of the head, neck, shoulder, and upper extremity, as well as for concussion, fractures, dislocations, and strains. Rugby players incurred 1.5 times more overuse and training injuries in relation to exposure time, and 2.7 times more match injuries than soccer players.'

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1724792/