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So Painful, Why Do I Hate It?


#1

Hey,

So I really need to start lifting weights again. I was on a pretty good roll (about 6 months) until August and then got busy and stopped.

The thing is that it was always so painful. DOMS, and just the pain involved in doing the exercise. Ok, so I am whining about that, and I guess I can either suck it up and do it, or not. Right?

But what I don't get is that I love aerobic exercise. The more I sweat and the more my lungs burn, the more I thrive on it. The closer I can get to collapsing, the greater I feel. So I am not adverse to pain! I just don't understand why I can't feel that way about weight lifting? I really need to lift weights, I just have to find a way to enjoy it..

Any ideas? Did anyone here hate weight lifting at first and grew to enjoy it? I remember a time about 20 years ago when I hated aerobic exercise and somehow I grew to love it and really need it. I just want to feel that way about weights.

Thanx.


#2

Funny. I’m the exact opposite. Can’t stand the pain of cardio and actually crave the pain of grinding out a heavy weight.


#3

[quote]kpsnap wrote:
Funny. I’m the exact opposite. Can’t stand the pain of cardio and actually crave the pain of grinding out a heavy weight. [/quote]

ha, so crazy! exact opposite! I wonder if you loved it the first time you did it or if you had to work at it


#4

Runner’s high or something similar for long-term cardio exercises.

While doing heavy lifts may create adrenaline if you train yourself to do so.

DOMS will go away within a couple of weeks if you just keep at it though.


#5

Why don’t you try a program like 5/3/1 with hill runs/cardio after?

Just because you lift weights does not mean you cant do your aerobic work. You just have to plan it carefully and accept the limitations and consequences of doing so.

What are your goal? What type of aerobic exercises are you doing?

tweet


#6

People tend to love what they are good at. Flexible people love to stretch and do yoga. People who find running easy tend to enjoy it and people who are naturally strong gravitate towards weight lifting.


#7

Get on a program where you stop before failure. Re DOMS make sure you warm down and stretch thoroughly after each workout. If you can afford it Plazma or an Anaconda product will pretty much eliminate soreness


#8

[quote]magick wrote:
Runner’s high or something similar for long-term cardio exercises.

While doing heavy lifts may create adrenaline if you train yourself to do so.

DOMS will go away within a couple of weeks if you just keep at it though.[/quote]

Thank you magick. My DOMS did not go away. Maybe in my legs, but not in my lats. My lats were non stop stiff the whole 6 months. Really stiff and contracted too. My butt was also usually stiff, but I didn’t mind that. It is mostly the lats that I cringe about working again.


#9

[quote]theBird wrote:
Why don’t you try a program like 5/3/1 with hill runs/cardio after?

Just because you lift weights does not mean you cant do your aerobic work. You just have to plan it carefully and accept the limitations and consequences of doing so.

What are your goal? What type of aerobic exercises are you doing?

tweet[/quote]

Oh absolutely! I will never give up cardio :slight_smile: The type of aerobic exercise I do is strenuous modern dance, advanced step aerobics (so hard that half the class is male). I also skip rope, run on the treadmill and trail run occasionally. I bike too but mostly for transportation. Except for biking, the music is a major part of the magic of aerobic exercise for me- it lifts me up and inspires me to go harder, especially when the tempo is really fast.

Goals for aerobic exercise is just to have a really good time and get energized & de-stressed.

Goals for weight lifting are strength and increasing my bone density. Last time I was doing weights I got really wrapped up in the challenge of doing pull-ups etc with the idea of taking a gymnastics class- that form of strength is really inspiring to me, but a really long way off and just non-stop upper body pain. I also want more lower body strength in order to support my skeleton while doing aerobics.

Re 5/3/1- well 2 things. One was that I really wanted to work on my back muscles with rows and lat pulldowns and was opposed to bench presses as I did not want to encourage bad posture with them and I’m not sure why I need strong chest muscles anyway. I did overhead presses- they were one of my favorites. I also did deadlifts and front squats but with these and the overhead presses I felt insecure about using large weights, like a little afraid that my muscles are stronger than my tendons, if that makes sense. I would max out on rows and lat pulldowns though but was frustrated that the higher I would go, the more sort of uncontrolled my movements would become, recruiting any and all muscles just to do it. I am sorry, I know I am not making much sense…

thank you


#10

[quote]JLone wrote:
People tend to love what they are good at. Flexible people love to stretch and do yoga. People who find running easy tend to enjoy it and people who are naturally strong gravitate towards weight lifting.

[/quote]

hmm I guess, but I was not naturally good at aerobics when I began. I did it for weight loss at first and hated it. That’s why I hold out hope that I can learn to love to lift weights and why I am wondering if people here liked weight lifting the first time they did it or did they have to work at it first. I think there are many areas in life that a person only grows to love. I would really like to hear about that.

I think I just need to try again.


#11

[quote]Reconstruction wrote:
My DOMS did not go away. Maybe in my legs, but not in my lats. My lats were non stop stiff the whole 6 months. Really stiff and contracted too. My butt was also usually stiff, but I didn’t mind that. It is mostly the lats that I cringe about working again.[/quote]
Workout nutrition is a huge factor in reducing DOMS. I remember you were dealing with some physical issues. I don’t recall what you were working around exactly, but if your lats were feeling destroyed after training them, that could’ve been a factor. There are a few steps to take that can also help reduce soreness (de-emphasizing negatives, minimizing exercise choices and volume manipulation, foam rolling, etc.).

Why would bench presses, or any other exercise done with proper form and volume, encourage bad posture? It wouldn’t.

Horizontal pressing/pushing is a basic movement pattern. Whether you get it from a barbell bench press, standing 1-arm cable press, or full range push-up, neglecting it is neglecting a fundamental aspect of development which can open you up to imbalances.

It makes sense, in the sense that many women have to overcome the same mental hurdle. Following a well-designed program with a track record of success should go towards alleviating those fears. That could be 5/3/1, could be Starting Strength, could be one of the other programs in the Article Archives here.

That pretty much sums it all up. You were on a roll before, so get back to it and don’t quit. If you get “too busy” again, adapt your training, don’t ditch it.


#12

[quote]Reconstruction wrote:
I felt insecure about using large weights, like a little afraid that my muscles are stronger than my tendons, if that makes sense.[/quote]
Maybe I’m way off base here, but for a lady, I think that making your muscles stronger than your tendons to such an extent as to cause injury is exceedingly difficult if not completely impossible without the use of some heavy PED’s. At normal rates of muscle development in size and strength your connective tissues shouldn’t have any trouble keeping up, unless you have some kind of significant wear and tear on your tendons and ligaments and whatnot.


#13

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

Workout nutrition is a huge factor in reducing DOMS. I remember you were dealing with some physical issues. I don’t recall what you were working around exactly, but if your lats were feeling destroyed after training them, that could’ve been a factor. There are a few steps to take that can also help reduce soreness (de-emphasizing negatives, minimizing exercise choices and volume manipulation, foam rolling, etc.).
[/quote]

yes! I just read an article here today about protien. I don’t think I was getting more than 80 grams a day, at the very most. I hope that was why. Also, I was doing a lot of pullovers which I think are eccentric exercises, if that is what you mean by negatives.

My physical issues 2 years ago was sciatica and plantar faciitis. That has been better for over a year. I know the exact exercise that causes the sciatica and my feet are great. I have low bone density, that’s it.

I hope the non stop soreness was due to not enough protein!

well I read here that figure models do not bench press and they are fine. Not that I want to be a figure model but just making the point that I believe it was CT who said it is not necessary. In any event, I am willing to do it, I am fine with that.

[quote]
It makes sense, in the sense that many women have to overcome the same mental hurdle. Following a well-designed program with a track record of success should go towards alleviating those fears. That could be 5/3/1, could be Starting Strength, could be one of the other programs in the Article Archives here.[/quote]

yes I read up on 5/3/1 today and was impressed with how conservative it is. I particularly liked his comment "“And the reason I came up with 5/3/1 was that I wanted a program that eliminated stupid thoughts from my head and just let me go into the weight room and get shit done.” This was huge for me last time around- just so much mental farting around with deciding what to do, and how much to do, and on and on. I am hoping I can at least start 5/3/1 with dummbells?

thanx


#14

[quote]csulli wrote:
Maybe I’m way off base here, but for a lady, I think that making your muscles stronger than your tendons to such an extent as to cause injury is exceedingly difficult if not completely impossible without the use of some heavy PED’s. At normal rates of muscle development in size and strength your connective tissues shouldn’t have any trouble keeping up, unless you have some kind of significant wear and tear on your tendons and ligaments and whatnot.[/quote]

well I meant blow a gasket in general terms. I am not sure exactly what gives way when a weight lifter injures himself?

I know I came very close once on the leg extension machine and it felt like my patellar tendon. And in that case, yes, I think my tendon is weaker than my muscle, however bizarre that sounds, likely because the leg extension machine is an unnatural movement.
Shoulder raises also seem to strain my bicepital tendon more than any muscle involved.

I guess I just mean that weight lifters injure themselves all the time by lifting too heavy, right? Like the adrenaline in the moment allows them to lift heavier than they should but it is not until afterwards that they realize they went too far.

Like the time on the leg extension machine- I didn’t know “oh I am about to strain my tendon” until after it happened and I was just very lucky that I was still being somewhat prudent. I honestly feel I could have ripped it off.

anyway, it looks like 5/3/1 may be more conservative than I thought, though 5 reps is low the loads increase gradually so it should be safe.

thank you for your comments, I really appreciate it.


#15

Hi,
I used to love cardio and would get the burn that you describe, as well as a big endorphin rush. I’d feel well ‘worked out’ after every session - there would be lots of sweat, tired muscles and increased heart rate.

When I first started lifting weights, the transition from regular cardio to lifting was mentally very hard. I suspect this was because, as a beginner, I didn’t really know how to lift weights in the most effective way, nor were the weights probably heavy enough to really make me feel worked.

It does take some time, but stick at it, and I assure you that once you advance in lifting and know exactly what you are doing / feel more comfortable pushing heavy weight, you will get the same (if not, much stronger!) adrenaline and endorphin rush.

It took me a long time to get away from the cardio bug, probably around a year. I can securely say though that 5 years later, now doing very heavy Olympic lifting and lifting over bodyweight for many lifts, every workout is as though I had an intense cardio session!

Hope that helps.


#16

Yeah 80 grams protein not enough. -read Charles Staley’s article from a day or two ago says that after a period of taking 250g protein a day he can’t literally train hard enough to get sore


#17

[quote]Reconstruction wrote:
I just read an article here today about protien. I don’t think I was getting more than 80 grams a day, at the very most. I hope that was why.[/quote]
80 grams of protein a day might’ve been fine if you didn’t know what a barbell looked like and didn’t ever break a sweat, but a general ballpark for people who lift is about 1 gram per pound of bodyweight per day. Also, when I said “workout nutrition” I meant a carb-protein shake to have before, during, or immediately after training. That gives your muscles the fast nutrition they need to start recovery ASAP.

The “negative” or eccentric part of a rep is when the muscle stretches (it’s usually when you’re lowering the weight, depending on the exercise. The other half of the rep is the positive or concentric). Pullovers do put the muscles through a long range of motion though, so that could’ve also been a factor.

As long as you’re focusing on dumbbell variations of big compound exercises, it should be fine.


#18

maybe you are increasing the weights too much at a time? i think fractional plates are important for women. or at least, they are important for me if i don’t want to prematurely stall / get injured. maybe you aren’t so into leg extensions. i find it hard to get enthusiastic about the leg extension machine, myself. i find it more motivating to get excited about a goal like… being able to to a pull up or something like that. then working towards that goal maybe not following a program exactly, but just spending some time playing about working on it. i kind of get into a zone and enjoy it. trying (and failing) to do a pistol, or whatever. figure out how to have some fun with it.


#19

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

80 grams of protein a day might’ve been fine if you didn’t know what a barbell looked like and didn’t ever break a sweat, but a general ballpark for people who lift is about 1 gram per pound of bodyweight per day. Also, when I said “workout nutrition” I meant a carb-protein shake to have before, during, or immediately after training. That gives your muscles the fast nutrition they need to start recovery ASAP.
[/quote]

Well I did it, I started 5/3/1 with OLY barbells today. I worked up to 65# for deadlifts and it was still very easy. I am guessing my 1 rep max is at least double that. Maybe more. It will take me a couple of weeks to get up to where I should be. It was painless. My gym has got with the times and placed an oly bar and a variety of plates in the upstairs area of the gym so I am all set up now to do 5/3/1/ properly!! And its very easy because it is simple and not time consuming.

So thank you!

The real challenge will be downing 140 grams of protien a day. Ha, that is a lot. Plus I am trying to stay away from milk products-

anyway, gotta go, my chicken breast is ready :slight_smile:

thanx again, I think I just needed some encouragement.


#20

[quote]alexus wrote:
maybe you are increasing the weights too much at a time? i think fractional plates are important for women. or at least, they are important for me if i don’t want to prematurely stall / get injured. maybe you aren’t so into leg extensions. i find it hard to get enthusiastic about the leg extension machine, myself. i find it more motivating to get excited about a goal like… being able to to a pull up or something like that. then working towards that goal maybe not following a program exactly, but just spending some time playing about working on it. i kind of get into a zone and enjoy it. trying (and failing) to do a pistol, or whatever. figure out how to have some fun with it.[/quote]

Hi Alexus, thank you for replying! Yes, for sure, I was trying to add more and more weight. I would feel bad if I could not add more weight, I guess I was getting carried away. Well pull ups are my biggest goal because of their connection to gymnastics. I guess that’s why my lats were always sore. I could not progress on my grip strength doing just vertical hangs, it was very frustrating. I could also not seem to break 100-100# on the lat pulldown. I think that is a reason I stopped.

Anyway, this time around I am going to lower my expectations or get into it for the long term. And eat more protien. Maybe, hopefully, I will be able to progress more with more protien. And 5/3/1 doesn’t have lat pulldowns though it claims my strength from it will make other exercises easier so I am just going to do what everyone else does and do 5/3/1. For now :slight_smile:

Thank you!