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So I'm Starting Boxing

Can’t wait.
Gimme some words of advice people.
I find those head protection things gay though :\

[quote]legendaryblaze wrote:
Can’t wait.
Gimme some words of advice people.
I find those head protection things gay though :[/quote]

You won’t find them gay for long,buddy.

1.) Find a good coach.

2.) Don’t listen to (most) people on the internet.

I used to find headguards gay too… Then I started sparring people who can punch. Me and the headguard are good friends now.

Actually in all seriousness, at my club we don’t train with headguards until 3 weeks out from a fight. A) because they’re annoying as fuck B) because our coach believes headguards teach you a bad habit of not moving your head enough since they desensitize you to just how much a clean shot will actually hurt.

[quote]Aussie Davo wrote:
B) because our coach believes headguards teach you a bad habit of not moving your head enough since they desensitize you to just how much a clean shot will actually hurt.[/quote]

This is what i’m saying. The reality of a hit to an unprotected head is much much different than having those headguards.

Apparently the coach is really good here but whatever. Remains to be seen :smiley:
Where the fuck is fighting irish. That son of a bitch better post in ma thread :frowning:

[quote]legendaryblaze wrote:
Can’t wait.
Gimme some words of advice people.
I find those head protection things gay though :[/quote]

not much to say since you’ve began training, other than be patient. keep track of your weight too.

oh yeah, don’t expect your coaches to be strength and conditioning geniuses either.

As long as they know their boxing, i don’t care!
But that was a great comment and something i’ll keep in mind. Thanks.

[quote]legendaryblaze wrote:
Apparently the coach is really good here but whatever. Remains to be seen :smiley:
Where the fuck is fighting irish. That son of a bitch better post in ma thread :([/quote]

Hahahahah.

Most of what you need to know is stuff you’re just going to have to ingrain in yourself by doing it over and over and over and over.

My tips to you would be:

  1. Always take it outside. Never fight inside the bar.

  2. Never underestimate your opponent.

Shit, sorry, that’s the rules from Roadhouse.

Honestly-

Keep your fucking hands up. All the time, all the time, all the time. Don’t let them drop down after you hit someone- pull it straight back, and don’t let your strong hand drop from your chin when you’re punching, and always keep that lead hand up.

KEEP YOUR CHIN DOWN! It will keep you from getting KO’d, or at least give you a better shot. How I learned it was that your chin should be low enough that it should be uncomfortable for you to look straight ahead… it should take you some time to get used to it.

Shadowbox constantly in a mirror. It’s going to teach you rhythm, what kind of pace you’ll keep up, your combos, and your footwork, and it’s going to be the most important tool you got.

If you have any more specific questions, let me know and I’ll try to answer them as best I can.

How do you shadow box exactly?
The chin stuff is noted.
How useful are body shots and what should i aim for?
What are simple beginner mistakes?
thx

pay attention to the basics blaze. proper punching technique, footwork, hand positioning, ring awareness, head movement, and distance. Theres a lot of things to pay attention to. good thing is you’ll drill the fuck outta them. Just listen and practice practice practice the basics. To maky people wanna get in there and slug and forget the basics.

[quote]legendaryblaze wrote:
How do you shadow box exactly?
[/quote]

Have your coach show you. It took me a long, long time to get to the point where I felt what I was doing was right, but I also was learning from an MMA guy who knew about striking but not particularly about boxing.

More or less, stick to the basics. Work on stepping and throwing a good 1-2 for about two months. Then throw in a 1-2-3, then work on stepping with that one.

Again, it’s kind of something that I can’t show you over the internet… your coach will show you. But for an idea of what the basics are, look at this:

Now this guy I like, but only his feet. I hate the way he punches, especially his jab, but he’s very light on his feet, and is always moving.

And here, as always, is the master.

Body shots are excellent. The left hook to the liver is a punch that Mexicans are predominantly known for, although some white guys like Hatton, Ward, and Gatti can get it down. Southpaws can develop a good straight left to the body as well…

However, there are two things about it- one, it depends on your body type and fighting style. The Muhammad Ali type will not use body shots as much as the Joe Frazier type- he simply won’t be in the same position to do it. Not to say that a taller boxer can’t use body shots- of course they can, and they should. But their fight will predominantly be on the outside, where headhunting is a little more prevalent.

In my experience, the more of a brawler a guy is, the more he’s going to try to hurt you the body. If a fighter is powerful enough and hits the right spot, it can end a fight right there, too. However, to get inside to throw effective punches, you’ve got to know how to position yourself to get inside. This includes bobbing and weaving, slipping, jabbing, and putting yourself in the right spot to deliver a good hook or uppercut.

Always keep your head moving, otherwise you’ll be hit so goddamned hard coming in that you’ll get into a “Take 2 to give 1” spot, and you’d better be a powerful puncher with an iron chin to play that game.

Again, though, your coach will show you.

[quote]
What are simple beginner mistakes?
thx[/quote]

The things I said in my initial post- letting hands fall, letting the chin hang out, not practicing enough… get those down first.

And don’t get overwhelmed. You won’t walk in and look like Pretty boy… it’s gonna take a long while to get your shit down.

Awesome.
The area i am in, there isn’t much in terms of fighting (be it wrestling, judo, karate, boxing or whatever).
It seems my boxing club is an amateur boxing club.
Apparently you have to wear the head gear and all that crap and it seems to also focus on points. It seems like amateur boxing = olympic tae kwon do and professional boxing = kyokushin.
I am not interested in competing (that road is far ahead) but i don’t want to train for this point system crap.
Does this matter or are all boxing gyms like this and you adapt it for your goals?
I understand that i’ll still learn how to duck, bob and weave and jab, etc but if the emphasis are different, then that matters.

What did you expect?

this is your first day right?

[quote]kmcnyc wrote:
What did you expect?

this is your first day right?
[/quote]

No i haven’t gone yet. :stuck_out_tongue: I start later today (1am46 here)

WO WO WO WO YOUNG BUCK!!! boxing is more than just slugging it out. Pretty much every great pro had an extensive amatuer career. That is were you learn the BASICS and without them you will never be a good fighter.

Hey, i’ve got show some excessive enthusiasm! How else will i get my ass handed to me to really learn what it takes?

Only tidbit I can think of; the first time you’re sparring and your partner hits you in the face, is a good experience. Because after that you learn to protect your head. Boxing is awesome fun man, it takes alot of time to learn but its a great skill to have no matter what you wish to do with it.

they’re going to train you for amateur fighting because that’s what you’re, and that’s how you’ll have to compete as most likely. points vs rounds is completely different. if you don’t want to train for it then talk to your coach.

once you learn stance and how to throw punches, shadow boxing is really to perfect your technique and correct bad habits. it can be used to work on anything, other than sparring it’s the closest thing to fighting. use your imagination with it and change it up.

good places for body shits are the ribs, shoulders, and obliques. you’ve to work with what you’ve though. mix it up and use body shots to set yourself up for something. if you can knock the wind out of someone then you can set yourself up for an easy knockout.

i’d say the biggest amateur mistake is trying to emulate fighters too much, it can get you hurt pretty bad. watching film is good, but trying to fight like you’re muhammad ali when you’re not nearly as quick will get you rocked. after that i’d say hesitating.

HANDS UP/CHIN DOWN, shadowbox, shadowbox, shadow box. Take a page out of combat core; hold a kettlebell/med ball/sand bag/whatever you can find, rack it in your guard position…resume shadowboxing. I hold a 25lb kettle in the left hand in guard position and then do a 3min round of shadowboxing working the right hand. After the round, switch hands. This will train you to keep your hands up.

After round 6 I go heavier to the standard kettle size and bring my kicks into the mix, but if you’re boxing only, keep going heavier. The important thing, as mentioned in other posts, KEEP YOUR HANDS UP and snap your punches back to guard as fast if not faster than your threw it. To keep your chin down, shadowbox holding a tennis ball under your chin. You drop the ball, you start the round over.

On conditioning, you cant train like a body builder going for max hypertrophy. You have to train like a fighter. If you lift, go from exercise to exercise with little to no rest periods. Become friends with burpees/pullups/push ups/body weight stuff and when you lift, lift hard and fast. Add as much plyometrics to your stuff as possible. I like squat jumps with 65%1RM over plyoboxes.

One last thing that will save you a ton of grief; when you spar FFS dont go for a KO. A lot of new fighters think you should go 100% during sparring, headgear or not. That is a huge mistake. Use sparring to learn how to put your punches together and work defense. If you dont like headgear, dont wear them. Learn how not to get hit, which is more important than learning how to hit.

When guys I spar with that get cocky, I drop my hands and try to make an ass out of them by defending and dodging everything they throw at me. If you think getting hit makes you mad, not being able to land a shot really makes you mad. Especially when the guy you are trying to hit is smiling and laughing at you. Think Nassem Hammed. I’d love to punch that guy.