T Nation

Snatch Grip Width


#1

What is the best way to find the correct grip width for the snatch? Thanks.


#2

One way is to abduct your arms to 90 degrees. Bend your elbows. Measure from elbow to elbow across your back. That’s your grip width.

Another, the bar, when overhead, should be from six to eight inches from the top of your head.


#3

More snatching. Your technique will allow for grip adjustments. Need help turning over, go wider. Need more pull, go narrower.

I’m 6’ and long limbed, I’m millimeters shy of touching the collars.


#4

I have done that. That grip puts me just outside the rings. This feels good when in the overhead position. But I’ve seen something suggesting to have the bar rest in the pelvic crease. This changes the width. I am 6’2" and the pelvis measurement has my hands almost to the collars.


#5

Collar to collar is fine as long as it does not put too much strain on your shoulders. This is where you want to check the distance between the bar and your head when overhead. Much more important than where it hits your pelvis. Some will go with a wider than textbook grip for that purpose, and it’s OK as long as the shoulders can handle it.

Arm, leg, torso length variances at play here.

Wider is more unstable overhead, compare the jerk overhead to the snatch. Which lift is lost behind? By far, more snatches than jerks, and when jerks are lost backwards it’s not due to shoulder stability.


#6

Collar to collar is fine as long as it does not put too much strain on your shoulders. This is where you want to check the distance between the bar and your head when overhead. Much more important than where it hits your pelvis. Some will go with a wider than textbook grip for that purpose, and it’s OK as long as the shoulders can handle it.

Arm, leg, torso length variances at play here.

Wider is more unstable overhead, compare the jerk overhead to the snatch. Which lift is lost behind? By far, more snatches than jerks, and when jerks are lost backwards it’s not due to shoulder instability.