T Nation

Snatch Grip Deadlifts from a Deficit

Hello CT!

I currently have a medical condition. When I squat with a shoulder width stance and the toes pointed out, I get knee pain.

When I do squats with a hip width stance and toes pointed straight ahead, I have almost zero pain. I can also do pistol squats perfectly fine.

In your experience, is it reasonable to perform the snatch grip deadlift from a deficit with a straight bar using a hip width stance and the toes straight ahead?
I have studied several stances olympic lifters use for their pulls, but I do not recall anyone ever using a hip width stance and the toes straight ahead. I just want to make sure I am not putting my back or hip at risk here. Thank you so much!
Ted

[quote]bro1989 wrote:
Hello CT!

I currently have a medical condition. When I squat with a shoulder width stance and the toes pointed out, I get knee pain.

When I do squats with a hip width stance and toes pointed straight ahead, I have almost zero pain. I can also do pistol squats perfectly fine.

In your experience, is it reasonable to perform the snatch grip deadlift from a deficit with a straight bar using a hip width stance and the toes straight ahead?
I have studied several stances olympic lifters use for their pulls, but I do not recall anyone ever using a hip width stance and the toes straight ahead. I just want to make sure I am not putting my back or hip at risk here. Thank you so much!
Ted[/quote]

From my experience SGDL from a deficit are mechanically a bad idea unless you have REALLY long arms. For most people it just put you in a weird starting position. Anwyay. you can get just as deep of a squat using a regular bar setting and making sure that the torso is as upright as possible in the starting position.

Now, there is a slight problem with the feel position your mention: the knees will be in the way. Most olympic lifter have the toes turned out a bit. That helps clear the knees. Otherwise, you will have to push the knees back to initiate the lift.

Or you could buy a Dead-Squat bar which will solve that issue.

For a long time I wasn’t able to squat because of a patellar tracking issue. I only did the Dead-Squat… didn’t lose anything in leg size and did squats yestersay for the first time in ages and the strength is still there.

Thank you for the quick reply, CT!

A dead-squat bar sounds like the perfect solution to my problem. I did experiment with trap bars but they are just not wide enough.

So you think it is reasonable to use the dead-squat bar with a hip width stance and toes strait ahead?
Would it make sense to pull from a deficit here to increase VMO activation?

Thanks again!
Ted

[quote]bro1989 wrote:
Thank you for the quick reply, CT!

A dead-squat bar sounds like the perfect solution to my problem. I did experiment with trap bars but they are just not wide enough.

So you think it is reasonable to use the dead-squat bar with a hip width stance and toes strait ahead?
Would it make sense to pull from a deficit here to increase VMO activation?

Thanks again!
Ted[/quote]

The Dead-Squat bar is like 2x the width of a trap bar… I’ve had Canada’s strongest load it up, and lift 1060lbs on it…