T Nation

Slow Twitch and Growth?

Hey all, just a quick question about something that’s bugged me for awhile.

We’ve all heard the general rule: if it’s fast-twitch, hit it with heavy weights, for lower rep ranges. If it’s slow-twitch, hit it with high reps.

What I don’t understand is…how does working our slow-twitch fibers with relentless high reps/minimal weight do ANYTHING for their growth? Long distance runners work the heck out of their slow twitch fibers, and have no muscle to show for it.

Am I missing something here? Is there a good way to get type I fibers to actually get larger and thus contribute to muscle “fullness”? I’d always heard the more you train the type I fibers, the thinner they’d get to due becoming more efficient at gas exchange?

Instead of going high reps for type I’s, couldn’t we do high “volume” instead?

Just something that’s been on my mind for awhile and I haven’t asked on here yet. Thanks for any input…I realize I may just be missing something here.

[quote]thebigbus wrote:
Hey all, just a quick question about something that’s bugged me for awhile.

We’ve all heard the general rule: if it’s fast-twitch, hit it with heavy weights, for lower rep ranges. If it’s slow-twitch, hit it with high reps.

What I don’t understand is…how does working our slow-twitch fibers with relentless high reps/minimal weight do ANYTHING for their growth? Long distance runners work the heck out of their slow twitch fibers, and have no muscle to show for it.

Am I missing something here? Is there a good way to get type I fibers to actually get larger and thus contribute to muscle “fullness”? I’d always heard the more you train the type I fibers, the thinner they’d get to due becoming more efficient at gas exchange?

Instead of going high reps for type I’s, couldn’t we do high “volume” instead?

Just something that’s been on my mind for awhile and I haven’t asked on here yet. Thanks for any input…I realize I may just be missing something here.

[/quote]

forget slow twitch fuk that idea off… heavy, hard and explosive…fast twitch fibres all the way buddy…

[quote]thebigbus wrote:
Hey all, just a quick question about something that’s bugged me for awhile.

We’ve all heard the general rule: if it’s fast-twitch, hit it with heavy weights, for lower rep ranges. If it’s slow-twitch, hit it with high reps.

What I don’t understand is…how does working our slow-twitch fibers with relentless high reps/minimal weight do ANYTHING for their growth? Long distance runners work the heck out of their slow twitch fibers, and have no muscle to show for it.

Am I missing something here? Is there a good way to get type I fibers to actually get larger and thus contribute to muscle “fullness”? I’d always heard the more you train the type I fibers, the thinner they’d get to due becoming more efficient at gas exchange?

Instead of going high reps for type I’s, couldn’t we do high “volume” instead?

Just something that’s been on my mind for awhile and I haven’t asked on here yet. Thanks for any input…I realize I may just be missing something here.

[/quote]

light weight for high reps aint gonna do squat…only puscake do that shit because they think they will get ripped and have hawt abz

The reason distance runners have lame thighs, and 20-rep squatters have great thighs, is because one of them is utilizing progressive overload (and incidentally eating enough to build muscle).

However, I think it is a mistake to approach training with the philosophy of “do this for my fast-twitch fibers, do this for my slow-twitch fibers!” because that is really an oversimplification of human biology, and you really just need to find out what works the best for you and your own physique, and stick with that.

[quote]mr popular wrote:
The reason distance runners have lame thighs, and 20-rep squatters have great thighs, is because one of them is utilizing progressive overload (and incidentally eating enough to build muscle).
[/quote]

Marathon running is very catabolic too. That’s why it’s advised to keep the distance under 5k if you’re running for fat loss or w/e.

[quote]Marther wrote:
mr popular wrote:
The reason distance runners have lame thighs, and 20-rep squatters have great thighs, is because one of them is utilizing progressive overload (and incidentally eating enough to build muscle).

Marathon running is very catabolic too. That’s why it’s advised to keep the distance under 5k if you’re running for fat loss or w/e.[/quote]

“You really want to ramp up EPOC (Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption)? Do one 400 meter as fast as you can. The lactic acid you’re going to build up, and the furnace you’re going to stoke, is going to stay with you for days. You’ll cough your lungs up for hours. You work up to 1200 meters per workout and I can’t imagine your body fat ever being over 9%. It’s the best fat-loss program I know.” - Dan John

[quote]thebigbus wrote:
Hey all, just a quick question about something that’s bugged me for awhile.

We’ve all heard the general rule: if it’s fast-twitch, hit it with heavy weights, for lower rep ranges. If it’s slow-twitch, hit it with high reps.

What I don’t understand is…how does working our slow-twitch fibers with relentless high reps/minimal weight do ANYTHING for their growth? Long distance runners work the heck out of their slow twitch fibers, and have no muscle to show for it.

Am I missing something here? Is there a good way to get type I fibers to actually get larger and thus contribute to muscle “fullness”? I’d always heard the more you train the type I fibers, the thinner they’d get to due becoming more efficient at gas exchange?

Instead of going high reps for type I’s, couldn’t we do high “volume” instead?

Just something that’s been on my mind for awhile and I haven’t asked on here yet. Thanks for any input…I realize I may just be missing something here.

[/quote]

the difference between light and heavy weights are the order the musclefibers are recruited. heavy lifting recruits all fibers at once, both slow- and fasttwitch.