T Nation

Slow Burn

Have any of you ever heard of Slow Burn? I did a T-Nation search and I didn’t find anything so probably not.

It’s about ultra slow lifting to total failure. I’m getting the book from my local library to learn more.

the guys website is here: seriousstrength.com

The reason I got turned on to him is that the proteinpower website about healthy low carb living is recommending it. The two doctors are very good, Dr. Eades.

Anyhow, if any have experience with this let me know. I’m interested in learning as I’m trying to get my wife in the gym with me.

walleye

Bump.

I learned more about this workout. You do the whole body in each exercise session.

For example,

Benchpress
Squats
Pulldowns
Calf Raises
Dumbbell Press
Good Mornings
Tricep pushdowns
Abs
Curls

You then take 3 seconds to initiate the movement, and move the bar 1 inch, then 7 seconds to raise the bar, 3 seconds to reverse movement 1 inch and 7 seconds to lower bar, repeat.

Pick a weight that you can do 3-6 reps before failure.

My wife and I are trying this now, it looks like a good plan.

Our goal is to lose 100 pounds of fat, the author claims that this lifting technique will make your body burn fat and not muscle, because the failure of the muscle sends a signal to your body to keep your muscle and lose the fat.

I’m doing the protein power diet plan which is 1 gram protein to lean body mass, 40 grams or less of carbs a day, and Kcal less than 2000 per day.

The only supplement I’m taking is fiber 15 grams a day, 3 TBL fish oil (carlson laboratories brand), and Surge post workout which brings my workout day carbs to around 100g.

I’ll keep you posted. I’ve done a lot of power lifting training in the past, now I’m trying to lose fat.

I’m not sure I understand exactly how you’re performing the reps from your description. Are you getting an increasingly small range of motion on each rep?

I could be wrong but this sounds like a variation of the old SuperSlow* type of routine which… well… wasn’t taken particularly seriously in most training circles. I think the author’s claims are a stretch. Not that lifting minimizes muscle loss while dieting but that lifting THIS WAY minimizes muscle loss while dieting better than other ways of lifting. I don’t even think it’s necessary to go to failure to minimize muscle loss but I don’t think there are any studies that support either assertion.

But try it out and let us know how you do.

  • Superslow was a variation of HIT training where each rep was performed by lowering the bar for 10 seconds, not pausing, raising the bar for 10 seconds, not pausing, lowering the bar… etc. The idea was to keep the muscles under constant tension throughout the movement. I think it was one or two sets to failure.

This sort of training was supposed to be “safer” because it was less ballistic and you had to use less weight. The problem was that you were training yourself to be slow and generally didn’t get stronger. However, people who used it and liked it were pretty adamant about its benefits.

Get outta here with that stuff. You don’t know what a crap storm you’re going to start with that.

It’s bollacks, BTW.

If I ever want to train to be slow with light weights, then I’ll use it.

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Well, try it and see. If you’ve never lifted a weight before, you may progress nicely.

Fred Hahn (the author) has bee a stickler about his protocols. But if you read any threads on his forum, you’ll see he’s now “letting” a high-level bodybuilder train him in a more traditional fashion. Apparently Fred’s not quite getting the results he expected from his own prescription. This is no dis on Mr Hahn. It’s just a reminder that almost anything works … for a time.

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:
Well, try it and see. If you’ve never lifted a weight before, you may progress nicely.

Fred Hahn (the author) has bee a stickler about his protocols. But if you read any threads on his forum, you’ll see he’s now “letting” a high-level bodybuilder train him in a more traditional fashion. Apparently Fred’s not quite getting the results he expected from his own prescription. This is no dis on Mr Hahn. It’s just a reminder that almost anything works … for a time. [/quote]

Thanks for the info about Fred Hahn . . . He has the backing of Dr. Eades, who wrote Protein Power.

I’m most interested in getting my wife in the gym with me and losing fat. If I can get her in and we can lift together then we can expand from there.

What I do like about it is lifting to failure and trying to beat your last workout. I’ll let you all know how it goes. We are doing the protein power lifeplan consuming less than 40g of carbs a day.

I’ll keep you informed.

[quote]The Pencil Neck wrote:

I could be wrong but this sounds like a variation of the old SuperSlow* type of routine which… well… wasn’t taken particularly seriously in most training circles. I think the author’s claims are a stretch. Not that lifting minimizes muscle loss while dieting but that lifting THIS WAY minimizes muscle loss while dieting better than other ways of lifting. I don’t even think it’s necessary to go to failure to minimize muscle loss but I don’t think there are any studies that support either assertion.

  • Superslow was a variation of HIT training where each rep was performed by lowering the bar for 10 seconds, not pausing, raising the bar for 10 seconds, not pausing, lowering the bar… etc. The idea was to keep the muscles under constant tension throughout the movement. I think it was one or two sets to failure.

This sort of training was supposed to be “safer” because it was less ballistic and you had to use less weight. The problem was that you were training yourself to be slow and generally didn’t get stronger. However, people who used it and liked it were pretty adamant about its benefits.[/quote]

I’ve took a variation of his workout already. I’m a fan of big compound movements like deads, squats, bench, etc., One of his exercises he recommends are leg extensions which I think are pretty much worthless.

I’m doing full range of motion on the exercises. I’ll keep you posted on the fat loss and (possible) strength gains.

The eccentric portion of any movement should be done as fast as possible. (Look up “Compensatory Acceleration training”).

You should be using heavy enough weights to encourage the miofibrials to grow. This means using low enough reps that your fast twitch muscles are challenged before fatigue sets it. Once fatigue sets in you can not get stronger.

Here’s a good article on the subject: www.totalstrength.info/art_fatigue_and_tension.htm

If your goals include strength, power or size, the program you are looking at will not help you.

Stu