T Nation

Sleeping...

you can oversleep?? lol sometimes during hard training i take like 10-12 hours of sleep at night. but i feel like i need it so maybe im not over sleeping?

[quote]carter12 wrote:

I personally must have the testosterone levels of a eunuch because I need at least 9 hours to feel right.

[/quote]

That line killed me.

[quote]wressler125 wrote:

Indeed, on a longer timeline oversleeping can have the same negative effects on your sleep patterns that undersleeping can.
[/quote]

And you know this how?

[quote]Hrastnik wrote:
But like somebody else said, sleeping less means more time doing something else.
[/quote]

I have lasted 52 years and am in excellent health on 5-6 hours of sleep per night. No naps during the day either. I also sleep so “deeply” that it takes an explosion at close range to wake me from the dead. It’s been like this since I was a kid. This enables me to keep my full-time day job, workout in the evening, and play my guitar at night. And they said I’d never make it to 30. HA!!!

[quote]Hrastnik wrote:
I was thinking about gradually decreasing the length of sleep (slowly, a minute perhaps per day), and in few months perhaps get there.

Any suggestions?[/quote]

You could also try something that supposedly was a sleeping pattern that Leonardo da Vinci followed. Sleep 15-30 min every four hours. I think I’ve heard/read of a modern artist that tried that, but he quit after a while because he couldn’t find enough to do, especially in the night-time. You can’t paint in the night, can you? Leonardo went to the morgue and dissected bodies instead. Sometimes he stayed at home and planned machines of various kinds. Mostly war-machines, because that’s where the money is.

I sleep 5 hours a night and get by fine. I’ll sleep when I’m dead.

‘6 hours of sleep for a man, 7 for a woman, and 8 for a fool.’ - Napoleon

I’m skeptical of any “one size fits all” advice for sleep or any other area of life. Experiment on yourself, and note what works.

The only people who should be advocating absolute, unvarying advice for all people are Creationists. Darwinian evolution can’t work without genetic diversity. Find out what your individual make-up is live accordingly.

That said, this is what has worked for me: The theory that the hours you get before midnight matter more than those after definitely applies to me. I was really healthy and happy in hitting the sack at 9-10 pm and getting up around six. I’m trying to get back into that.

Best of luck to all.

Every year, many people get into car accidents because they are driving while sleep-deprived.

Witty sayings from famous people prove nothing.

If you require an alarm or some other external stimulus to wake up, you are not sleeping enough.

Sleeping less does not make you more productive. It gives you more time. If you are performing less efficiently due to sleep deprivation, then this is a fool’s bargain.

People love to brag about what superior genes they have. Most people are really about the same. There will always be the annoying person who says he only sleeps 2 hours a night and ‘feels great,’ just like there was always an annoying kid in class who claimed that they slept through all their classes, never studied, and still got As on all the tests. Neither is touched by God. Both are liars.

Yeah, I’m lying. I really sleep 12 hours per night. Twat.

People need 6-8 hours of sleep. Period. I’m in law school so I sleep 5 and feel great. The health risks associated with sleeping 9+ hours a night are the same as sleeping less than 6.

Show me some studies that show anyone needing more than 8 hours of sleep per night.

[quote]helga wrote:
You may want to do a bit more research on that (only if you honestly give a shit though). I have heard of studies (I cannot reference them but someone else may be able to) that indicate that sleeping too much is as bad as not sleeping enough. I assume that it was talking about chronic over sleeping, and not just the odd 10 hour night here or there.[/quote]

I would guess that any such study is confusing correlation with causation. After all, how do you force a normal, healthy person who wakes up naturally after eight or nine hours to sleep longer? If you can “sleep too much”, then something is wrong with you to begin with.

My job requires a high level of concentration, memory, etc. If I sleep until I wake up naturally, I’m much more productive than I am with even a little less sleep. If I’m taking the day off to work around the house or something, it doesn’t make much difference.

[quote]Jack_Dempsey wrote:
The health risks associated with sleeping 9+ hours a night are the same as sleeping less than 6.[/quote]

Without taking drugs, how can you force yourself to sleep longer than you need to? Sleeping for long periods of time is a symptom of problems, not a cause. It’s like saying “the health risks associated with having a blinding headache”.

[quote]karva wrote:
Hrastnik wrote:
I was thinking about gradually decreasing the length of sleep (slowly, a minute perhaps per day), and in few months perhaps get there.

Any suggestions?

You could also try something that supposedly was a sleeping pattern that Leonardo da Vinci followed. Sleep 15-30 min every four hours. I think I’ve heard/read of a modern artist that tried that, but he quit after a while because he couldn’t find enough to do, especially in the night-time. You can’t paint in the night, can you? Leonardo went to the morgue and dissected bodies instead. Sometimes he stayed at home and planned machines of various kinds. Mostly war-machines, because that’s where the money is.[/quote]

Kramer did that. He woke up in the East River.

Larry, I think some people sleep for recreation or due to boredom. I did as a teenager. It doesn’t necessarily mean you’re ill.

http://health.ucsd.edu/news/2002/02_08_Kripke.html

[quote]Jack_Dempsey wrote:
Yeah, I’m lying. I really sleep 12 hours per night. Twat.[/quote]

Amazing. I must be sleep-deprived, because I could have sworn that I wrote “2 hours,” and you wrote “5 hours.” Guess I should get some more sleep!

I am not saying that one cannot live on less sleep. Some people may even naturally only need five or six hours of sleep; that is, they might wake up naturally in that amount of time.

Most people are not this way. You might benefit from some shifts in the way you study so that you can get more sleep at night. People tend to think better and have improved memory and retention when they are getting a full night’s sleep.

Most people who are sleeping more than 9 hours a night are probably clinically depressed, or have some other kind of disorder.

Sleeping is not like food… one doesn’t sleep too much like one eats too much, unless there is some sort of disorder (either physical or mental).

People who sleep past their usual wake-up time will feel like crap in the morning, as opposed to people who go to bed earlier to try to catch up on sleep.

The only way to really tell how you respond to increased (proper) amounts of sleep is to do it for a couple of weeks. Otherwise, it is like working out once and concluding that exercise makes one sore without contributing to muscle growth.

[quote]Jack_Dempsey wrote:
Larry, I think some people sleep for recreation or due to boredom. I did as a teenager. It doesn’t necessarily mean you’re ill.[/quote]

Once I wake up naturally, I am unable to sleep again, at least for a few hours. If I stayed in bed in a dark room all day, I suppose I might possibly get a few hours total of off-and-on sleep, but then I wouldn’t be tired that night and would be unable to go to sleep at the usual time, so on a long-term basis I think it would be impossible for me to “sleep too much”. Now, I’ll allow for the possibly that this is not normal, but I have a feeling it is. It doesn’t make sense to me that having something or someone wake you up every morning would be necessary for good health. If you can sleep out of boredom, as you say, then you are probably depressed or something.

There is nothing about causation in that article, and that fact is specifically mentioned. Too much sleep may be a secondary cause of health problems, but I really doubt that it is a primary cause.