T Nation

Sleep Problems From Overtraining?

Does any one else have sleeping problems when they over train?

It seems when I go to bed latley I dont even sleep I move every 30 seconds or so it seems and its not the kind of moveing you do when you’r sleepy its like pushups in bed

what do you do to help get better sleep?

If you’re doing pushups in bed you are definitely overtraining…

I felt very restless, and couldn’t get a good night’s sleep when I started the Velocity Diet, and continued to train relatively hard. I think I ended up losing a little more muscle than I should have if I took Chris’ advice.

So I’d say yes, it could be a sign of it, or too few calories maybe?

You aren’t overtraining…It’s a myth…

[quote]Jason B wrote:
You aren’t overtraining…It’s a myth…
[/quote]

It is far from a myth.

Thats my bigggest clue that I’ve kicked my own ass to hard for to long…I cant sleep for no more than about 3-4 hours a night.It doesnt make sence.I take a few days off and I’ll sleep like a spanked baby.

[quote]Jason B wrote:
You aren’t overtraining…It’s a myth…
[/quote]

if over training is a myth I should be the worlds strongest man right now

as far as how many calories I eat the day I had realy realy shity sleap I ate

BREAKFAST
huge bole pasta+mushrooms
no explode

deadlift
biceps

LUNCH
huge bole pasta+mushrooms

PRE WORKOUT
huge bole pasta
3 chicken breast+onions+mushrooms

shoulders

DINNER
huge bole pasta
3 scoop whey
3 tbs peanutbutter
2 cups milk

not alot of protein but plenty of calories @ carbs

[quote]n3wb wrote:
Jason B wrote:
You aren’t overtraining…It’s a myth…

if over training is a myth I should be the worlds strongest man right now

[/quote]

I doubt you have the genetics for that. But maybe you are the lucky .0000001% who does?!?!

[quote]trust0 wrote:
It is far from a myth.[/quote]

Not for the majority of the people posting on this board.

I would suggest that the problem could be something to do with a decent amount of training mixed with poor nutrition.

Not getting enough of the right nutrients is very harmful.

I used to buy into over training when I was younger. Being around elite athletes on a regular basis soon changed my ideas on what one individual can cope with.

I’m not going to get into the overtraining debate, but especially hard workouts, legs in particular either make me sleep more than usual or practically not at all if that helps in the least.

[quote]Iron Beast wrote:
trust0 wrote:
It is far from a myth.

Not for the majority of the people posting on this board.

I would suggest that the problem could be something to do with a decent amount of training mixed with poor nutrition.

Not getting enough of the right nutrients is very harmful.

I used to buy into over training when I was younger. Being around elite athletes on a regular basis soon changed my ideas on what one individual can cope with.

[/quote]

Finally, another sane person. I can’t believe how many people on these forums think they are overtraining. Or maybe I just run across all of those posts…could be my bad luck…

Olympic athletes train for 6-8 hours a day, and that is probably their light day, so obviously overtraining isn’t a concern for them. Yet, some around here think their 4-5 60-75 minute weightlifting sessions a week is causing “overtraining”. It would actually be laughable if it weren’t so stupid…

you are probably overreaching not overtraining
true overtraining is a sympton that takes months or even a whole year to recover from.

From that little blurb you gave, I can’t see how you’re over training. Your diet sucks. That will affect your recovery a lot. Make a more balanced diet program.

Someone tell him about NO-Xplode.

Drink more milk, especially right after your workouts. In fact, add some yoghurt and fruit and make a shake with some protein powder. Blend. From what I’ve read, that would be the healthiest meal you have. That’s a sad state. Where’s the eggs, toast and milk in your diet?

Poor sleep is my first symptom of OT.

[quote]kroby wrote:
From that little blurb you gave, I can’t see how you’re over training. Your diet sucks. That will affect your recovery a lot. Make a more balanced diet program.

Someone tell him about NO-Xplode.

Drink more milk, especially right after your workouts. In fact, add some yoghurt and fruit and make a shake with some protein powder. Blend. From what I’ve read, that would be the healthiest meal you have. That’s a sad state. Where’s the eggs, toast and milk in your diet?[/quote]

my diet does suck, but that was just 1 day my diet changes alot no set plan
that day I had a bunch of pasta in my house ect…

Usualy I eat better than that mixed nuts yogurt more mike “chocolate milk” no eggs tho

I read alot of powerlifters eat like shit “dave tate atricle” and I thought about it, I was eating pretty clean but I was weak as fuck so I ate what ever I wanted and got way stronger/bigger

I know how to get rid of what I consider “over training” just rest

I used to eat verry healthy good diet enough of everything and It took me way longer to recover from a back day or a leg day than it does now

But I should definatley add some more healthy food to the mix, thanks for your suggestion.

[quote]Jason B wrote:

<<< Olympic athletes train for 6-8 hours a day, and that is probably their light day, so obviously overtraining isn’t a concern for them. Yet, some around here think their 4-5 60-75 minute weightlifting sessions a week is causing “overtraining”. It would actually be laughable if it weren’t so stupid…

[/quote]

The olympic games encompass numerous types of athletic events some of which lend themselves to 6-8 hour daily training sessions (ex. figure skating) and some that do not (ex. weight lifting) Show me an olympic lifter that trains 6-8 hours a day and we’ll be talking apples to apples.

[quote]Jason B wrote:

<<< Olympic athletes train for 6-8 hours a day, and that is probably their light day, so obviously overtraining isn’t a concern for them. Yet, some around here think their 4-5 60-75 minute weightlifting sessions a week is causing “overtraining”. It would actually be laughable if it weren’t so stupid…

Tiribulus wrote:
The olympic games encompass numerous types of athletic events some of which lend themselves to 6-8 hour daily training sessions (ex. figure skating) and some that do not (ex. weight lifting) Show me an olympic lifter that trains 6-8 hours a day and we’ll be talking apples to apples.[/quote]

Here, here.

If you do 4-5 days of 60-75 min/day and don’t get to a point of OT once in a while, then it’s your routine that’s laughable.

over-training is pretty easy when you don’t eat enough

You most definitely should take a break. 4 or 5 days of rest and eating. And, no, you will not lose anything. I had your symptoms of restless sleep and I stupidly continued 4x a week TBT and got sick very quickly which ruined my workouts for the next 2 weeks.

[quote]simon-hecubus wrote:
Jason B wrote:

<<< Olympic athletes train for 6-8 hours a day, and that is probably their light day, so obviously overtraining isn’t a concern for them. Yet, some around here think their 4-5 60-75 minute weightlifting sessions a week is causing “overtraining”. It would actually be laughable if it weren’t so stupid…

Tiribulus wrote:
The olympic games encompass numerous types of athletic events some of which lend themselves to 6-8 hour daily training sessions (ex. figure skating) and some that do not (ex. weight lifting) Show me an olympic lifter that trains 6-8 hours a day and we’ll be talking apples to apples.

Here, here.

If you do 4-5 days of 60-75 min/day and don’t get to a point of OT once in a while, then it’s your routine that’s laughable.[/quote]

you forget over training “isnt real”

[audience]ooOOOooo AHHHHhh[/audience]