T Nation

Sled Training

Whats a good sled workout for getting your squat and deadlift up?

How about squatting and deadlifting??

Just because the westside guys do it doesn’t mean it’s gonna be a miracle worker for you. Judging by your profile (and screen name!) you’re a relative newb.

You need to stop worrying about all these extra workouts and special exercises to build your squat and pull.

The magic solution is in fact… squat and deadlift more. I would state that until you get towards the advanced level that simply squatting and pulling more often will maek you stronger on those movement purely because you’re teaching your muscles how to work better.

Train hard and train heavy. Eat like a big and sleep like a cat. Simple. But not easy.

Leave the advanced methods til you’re advanced. Or approaching that level.

What Hanley said and the sled its meant more for conditioning then anything. The west side guys warm more about over doing it on the sled then they do under doing it. AS in newbies over do the sled load it up and drag heavy ass weight around that inhibits recovery from your REAL work outs those of DLing squating and the accessories.

sure sled is great for the conditioning but look the the gym to bring your lifts up.

Phill

Find your weak areas in both your squat and deadlift and focus your energy on bringing these areas up. It’s really just about that simple:)

Considering that you specifically asked about sled work, perhaps you could use the sled on your off days to give your weak areas a bit of work.

But the bottom line is that the sled is just another tool in the box. If need be, get an honest opinion on your form from a qualified individual to help seek out your sticking points.

Hook the strap up to your lifting belt and walk forward (the sled should be behind you). Make sure you are walking heel to toe, not toe to heel, to really hit the hams/glutes. Put weight on that you can walk with for about 100 yards.

[quote]Hanley wrote:
How about squatting and deadlifting??

Just because the westside guys do it doesn’t mean it’s gonna be a miracle worker for you. Judging by your profile (and screen name!) you’re a relative newb.

You need to stop worrying about all these extra workouts and special exercises to build your squat and pull.

The magic solution is in fact… squat and deadlift more. I would state that until you get towards the advanced level that simply squatting and pulling more often will maek you stronger on those movement purely because you’re teaching your muscles how to work better.

Train hard and train heavy. Eat like a big and sleep like a cat. Simple. But not easy.

Leave the advanced methods til you’re advanced. Or approaching that level.[/quote]

Not picking on you, I could have quoted any post in this thread really, but I don’t understand why beginners are told to “just do the movements” and “stop worrying about all these extra workouts and special movements.” I agree that a beginner will get more benefit out of doing the full movements, but if they can also do “extra” things to expedite that process, why shouldn’t they? As long as it isn’t negatively affecting their main workouts, I don’t see any reason why they can’t do it.

[quote]SprinterOne wrote:
Hanley wrote:
How about squatting and deadlifting??

Just because the westside guys do it doesn’t mean it’s gonna be a miracle worker for you. Judging by your profile (and screen name!) you’re a relative newb.

You need to stop worrying about all these extra workouts and special exercises to build your squat and pull.

The magic solution is in fact… squat and deadlift more. I would state that until you get towards the advanced level that simply squatting and pulling more often will maek you stronger on those movement purely because you’re teaching your muscles how to work better.

Train hard and train heavy. Eat like a big and sleep like a cat. Simple. But not easy.

Leave the advanced methods til you’re advanced. Or approaching that level.

Not picking on you, I could have quoted any post in this thread really, but I don’t understand why beginners are told to “just do the movements” and “stop worrying about all these extra workouts and special movements.” I agree that a beginner will get more benefit out of doing the full movements, but if they can also do “extra” things to expedite that process, why shouldn’t they? As long as it isn’t negatively affecting their main workouts, I don’t see any reason why they can’t do it.

[/quote]

I jsut think that if you exhaust all possible avenues to speed up the beginner to intermediate stage then once you’re looking to push it to the next level you’re gonna be in a whole new world of shit because there are no more tools left in the box.

Everyone looks for the easy way out. It’s human nature. Lets face it, dragging a sled is a hell of a lot easier and definately less intimadating than getting under a loaded bar.

Since beginners nervous systems are less efficent they can push and pull heavy weights in the classics lifts without risking over training. In my experience traditional periodization is a much more effective way to train for beginners or intermediates simply because doing the competitions lifts over and over again wires you to perform them better and more efficently.

My major gripe with westside is that for someone who has not even come close to perfecting their form on traditional squats, benches and pulls then NOT training these lifts makes absolutely no sense. Sure you can built your box squat etc but that does not neccessairly mean your free squat is going to go up too.

I think the Westside methods, at least from a powerlifting stand point, are best saved until a lifter gets to the stage where they are incapable of training heavy weekly with the classical lifts because it would put them into a state of over training.

Most often, beginners need to shut the fuck up, grow some balls and learn to fight against heavy weights and stop looking for shortcuts.

If you haven’t read the “education of a powerlifter” by Dave Tate, I think you should read it… like, right now…

and it probably wouldn’t hurt to read all other Dave Tate’s stuffs.

Il save it for the summer for when I need the extra stamina/leg drive for football

[quote]Hanley wrote:
SprinterOne wrote:
Hanley wrote:
How about squatting and deadlifting??

Just because the westside guys do it doesn’t mean it’s gonna be a miracle worker for you. Judging by your profile (and screen name!) you’re a relative newb.

You need to stop worrying about all these extra workouts and special exercises to build your squat and pull.

The magic solution is in fact… squat and deadlift more. I would state that until you get towards the advanced level that simply squatting and pulling more often will maek you stronger on those movement purely because you’re teaching your muscles how to work better.

Train hard and train heavy. Eat like a big and sleep like a cat. Simple. But not easy.

Leave the advanced methods til you’re advanced. Or approaching that level.

Not picking on you, I could have quoted any post in this thread really, but I don’t understand why beginners are told to “just do the movements” and “stop worrying about all these extra workouts and special movements.” I agree that a beginner will get more benefit out of doing the full movements, but if they can also do “extra” things to expedite that process, why shouldn’t they? As long as it isn’t negatively affecting their main workouts, I don’t see any reason why they can’t do it.

I jsut think that if you exhaust all possible avenues to speed up the beginner to intermediate stage then once you’re looking to push it to the next level you’re gonna be in a whole new world of shit because there are no more tools left in the box.

Everyone looks for the easy way out. It’s human nature. Lets face it, dragging a sled is a hell of a lot easier and definately less intimadating than getting under a loaded bar.

Since beginners nervous systems are less efficent they can push and pull heavy weights in the classics lifts without risking over training. In my experience traditional periodization is a much more effective way to train for beginners or intermediates simply because doing the competitions lifts over and over again wires you to perform them better and more efficently.

My major gripe with westside is that for someone who has not even come close to perfecting their form on traditional squats, benches and pulls then NOT training these lifts makes absolutely no sense. Sure you can built your box squat etc but that does not neccessairly mean your free squat is going to go up too.

I think the Westside methods, at least from a powerlifting stand point, are best saved until a lifter gets to the stage where they are incapable of training heavy weekly with the classical lifts because it would put them into a state of over training.

Most often, beginners need to shut the fuck up, grow some balls and learn to fight against heavy weights and stop looking for shortcuts.

[/quote]

It also works great for athletes that want to become proficient and strong in a variety of different movements, not just the traditional Big Three.