T Nation

Should We Take Over Mexico? It's Collapsing


#1

EL PASO - Mexico is one of two countries that "bear consideration for a rapid and sudden collapse," according to a report by the U.S. Joint Forces Command on worldwide security threats.

The command's "Joint Operating Environment (JOE 2008)" report, which contains projections of global threats and potential next wars, puts Pakistan on the same level as Mexico. "In terms of worse-case scenarios for the Joint Force and indeed the world, two large and important states bear consideration for a rapid and sudden collapse: Pakistan and Mexico.

Could Mexico collapse?
Do you think it is possible that the Mexican government could collapse in 2009?
Yes, the drug lords are taking over.
No, the government is still strong and will control the violence.
I'm not sure, it could still go either way.

"The Mexican possibility may seem less likely, but the government, its politicians, police and judicial infrastructure are all under sustained assault and press by criminal gangs and drug cartels. How that internal conflict turns out over the next several years will have a major impact on the stability of the Mexican state. Any descent by Mexico into chaos would demand an American response based on the serious implications for homeland security alone."

http://www.elpasotimes.com/newupdated/ci_11444354


#2

This is coming from the same information sources that predicted WMD in Iraq, no doubt?

Well, if it be true there is only one course of action to take: Decriminalize all narcotics.

Problem solved.


#3

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
This is coming from the same information sources that predicted WMD in Iraq, no doubt?

Well, if it be true there is only one course of action to take: Decriminalize all narcotics.

Problem solved.[/quote]

Decriminalization won’t stop the black market, only legalization will. Americans are too afraid of legalization. The only way legalization would happen, besides total economic collapse,is to show human rights violations against drug users.

It must be exposed that convicted drug users are providing a legal form of slavery (prison labor) today. It must be common knowledge that drug users are taking abuse (losing their property, losing their families, losing their freedoms) solely for PROFIT. Besides it isn’t the governments job to protect people from themselves.


#4

If I were Pookie, I would not be able to resist posting a satire thread:

VANCOUVER - The United States is one of two countries that “bear consideration for a rapid and sudden collapse,” according to a report by the Canadian Intelligence Resource Centre (CIRC) on worldwide security threats.

The Centre’s “Battlefield Awareness and Control Of Nation (BACON) 2008” report, which contains projections of global threats and potential next wars, puts Zimbabwe on the same level as the United States.

"In terms of worse-case scenarios for Canada and indeed the world, two large and important states bear consideration for a rapid and sudden collapse: Zimbabwe and the United States.

Could the United States collapse?
Do you think it is possible that the American government could collapse in 2009?
Yes, the socialists are taking over.
No, the national inertia is still massive and will mitigate the madness.
I don’t care, is American Idol on?

"The American possibility may seem less likely, but the government, its politicians, police and judicial infrastructure are all under sustained assault and press by communist dupes and failed economic policy.

How that internal conflict turns out over the next several years will have a major impact on the stability of the American state. Any descent by America into chaos would demand a Canadian response based on the serious implications for tourism alone."


#5

And who is buying all these drugs that are fueling the drug cartels? The USA.

So the only way to stop the cartels is to either legalize drugs or if the people in the US stop buying drugs.


#6

[quote]Lorisco wrote:
And who is buying all these drugs that are fueling the drug cartels? The USA.

So the only way to stop the cartels is to either legalize drugs or if the people in the US stop buying drugs.
[/quote]

If Mexico dissolves into chaos, we’re in trouble. Millions of hungry people will descend on us. It would be like having an elephant die in your yard — no matter what, you’ve got to deal with it.

Why doesn’t our government simply produce the drugs and sell them anyway? They could finance spending and probably make a much safer and saner product.


#7

[quote]Headhunter wrote:

If Mexico dissolves into chaos, we’re in trouble. Millions of hungry people will descend on us. It would be like having an elephant die in your yard — no matter what, you’ve got to deal with it.

[/quote]

I think millions of hungry Mexicans are already descending on us.

And on the second point, I think it’s more like having an elephant die in your neighbor’s yard, sure it stinks to high heaven, but there’s not a lot you can do about it.


#8

[quote]Headhunter wrote:

If Mexico dissolves into chaos, we’re in trouble. Millions of hungry people will descend on us. It would be like having an elephant die in your yard — no matter what, you’ve got to deal with it.

[/quote]

For once, I agree with your raving lunatic ass.

I saw that jerkoff Gingrich brought this up a week or so ago, and I started doing research myself on it.

Mexico may the ultimate dream of what the Italian mafia hoped to create- crooked ass judges, cops that moonlight as drug dealers, and stacks of bodies because of the drugs. This is getting horrifically bad.

Funny how we try to give democracy to all these shitbag countries around the world that don’t want it and hate us, while our neighbor to the south slowly crumbles.

Either way, I don’t know whether sending troops would be good for the US, but we may need to eventually. Mexico cannot fall into being a narco-state- that would be absolutely fucking terrible and have nothing but bad news for the US.

It doesn’t matter who’s fault it is at this point- if we have to fix it, we will.


#9

The only reasonable thing to do would be to end the prohibition of drugs. That would mean less government, not more. Current trends in US government are in the opposite direction.


#10

[quote]Headhunter wrote:
Lorisco wrote:
And who is buying all these drugs that are fueling the drug cartels? The USA.

So the only way to stop the cartels is to either legalize drugs or if the people in the US stop buying drugs.

If Mexico dissolves into chaos, we’re in trouble. Millions of hungry people will descend on us. It would be like having an elephant die in your yard — no matter what, you’ve got to deal with it.

Why doesn’t our government simply produce the drugs and sell them anyway? They could finance spending and probably make a much safer and saner product.

[/quote]

The government won’t do that because our politicians are owned by business interests that profit from the war on drugs. Even the drug dealers don’t want to see the war on drugs ended because they will be out of business.

Plus people don’t offer up a sane rational way to structure a legalization. So it is hard to get the message across to the average voter.


#11

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
Headhunter wrote:

If Mexico dissolves into chaos, we’re in trouble. Millions of hungry people will descend on us. It would be like having an elephant die in your yard — no matter what, you’ve got to deal with it.

For once, I agree with your raving lunatic ass.

I saw that jerkoff Gingrich brought this up a week or so ago, and I started doing research myself on it.

Mexico may the ultimate dream of what the Italian mafia hoped to create- crooked ass judges, cops that moonlight as drug dealers, and stacks of bodies because of the drugs. This is getting horrifically bad.

Funny how we try to give democracy to all these shitbag countries around the world that don’t want it and hate us, while our neighbor to the south slowly crumbles.

Either way, I don’t know whether sending troops would be good for the US, but we may need to eventually. Mexico cannot fall into being a narco-state- that would be absolutely fucking terrible and have nothing but bad news for the US.

It doesn’t matter who’s fault it is at this point- if we have to fix it, we will. [/quote]

The sad thing is we really wouldn’t need to even think about sending in troops if we didn’t have the war on drugs. A legalization would put the drug cartels out of business.


#12

Legalisation wouldn’t put the cartels out of business, it would put a serious dent in their revenues though as they struggled to move into other areas of opportunity.

As for Mexico steadily crumbling, what I have seen in the 7+ years that I have been spending time here is quite the reverse. Hell it’s a long way from perfect but there is actually a real air of optimism even with all the doom and gloom reports in the global media about global depression.

My company (which is a US company with a global presence) is actually looking to expand operations in Mexico at the moment due to how well we are doing here.

My wife’s company which is a British owned finance company is posting record figures here in Mexico and has a soaring share price.

The document that is referred to in the OP actually states on the first page that it is not an attempt at predicting the future.

All it is is a game of what if that helps the defence industry in the US to secure funding. If there is no potential enemy it’s pretty tough to get congress to sign off on budgets.


#13

[quote]Cockney Blue wrote:

[/quote]

You and your wife have a company each. And yours has a “global presence”.

I’m impressed.


#14

[quote]lixy wrote:
Cockney Blue wrote:

You and your wife have a company each. And yours has a “global presence”.

I’m impressed.[/quote]

I have a company and it is on this very globe.

I kid you not.


#15

Take over Mexico? Are you kidding?

Do you realise how much money you OWE Mexico?

More likely Mexico take over USA.

Here’s a suggestion: with your next pay packet, after tax, take half of that and mail it to Mexico to pay off your debt. Keep doing that for the next 20 years.


#16

[quote]Cockney Blue wrote:
Legalisation wouldn’t put the cartels out of business, it would put a serious dent in their revenues though as they struggled to move into other areas of opportunity.

As for Mexico steadily crumbling, what I have seen in the 7+ years that I have been spending time here is quite the reverse. Hell it’s a long way from perfect but there is actually a real air of optimism even with all the doom and gloom reports in the global media about global depression.

My company (which is a US company with a global presence) is actually looking to expand operations in Mexico at the moment due to how well we are doing here.

My wife’s company which is a British owned finance company is posting record figures here in Mexico and has a soaring share price.

The document that is referred to in the OP actually states on the first page that it is not an attempt at predicting the future.

All it is is a game of what if that helps the defence industry in the US to secure funding. If there is no potential enemy it’s pretty tough to get congress to sign off on budgets.[/quote]

Your experiences and Irish’s research seem to conflict. Maybe the areas around Mexico City are fine and up here near Yanqui-land is where all the bad stuff is?


#17

[quote]Magarhe wrote:
Take over Mexico? Are you kidding?

Do you realise how much money you OWE Mexico?

More likely Mexico take over USA.

Here’s a suggestion: with your next pay packet, after tax, take half of that and mail it to Mexico to pay off your debt. Keep doing that for the next 20 years.[/quote]

Are you on drugs?

V


#18

Hmm, be directly responsible for Mexico? No, thanks.


#19

[quote]lixy wrote:
Cockney Blue wrote:

You and your wife have a company each. And yours has a “global presence”.

I’m impressed.[/quote]

No, we work for companies. If I say, my company, I mean, the company for which I work.

Give me a couple of yrs though…


#20

[quote]Headhunter wrote:
Cockney Blue wrote:
Legalisation wouldn’t put the cartels out of business, it would put a serious dent in their revenues though as they struggled to move into other areas of opportunity.

As for Mexico steadily crumbling, what I have seen in the 7+ years that I have been spending time here is quite the reverse. Hell it’s a long way from perfect but there is actually a real air of optimism even with all the doom and gloom reports in the global media about global depression.

My company (which is a US company with a global presence) is actually looking to expand operations in Mexico at the moment due to how well we are doing here.

My wife’s company which is a British owned finance company is posting record figures here in Mexico and has a soaring share price.

The document that is referred to in the OP actually states on the first page that it is not an attempt at predicting the future.

All it is is a game of what if that helps the defence industry in the US to secure funding. If there is no potential enemy it’s pretty tough to get congress to sign off on budgets.

Your experiences and Irish’s research seem to conflict. Maybe the areas around Mexico City are fine and up here near Yanqui-land is where all the bad stuff is?

[/quote]

I don’t live in DF, I am about 5 hrs away in Guanajuato state. The problems are around DF and along both borders (the southern border is a joke and the areas close to it have some real issues.)

Here is a link to the actual paper. It isn’t research, it is a speculation piece. Read the first page and that is made very clear.

http://www.jfcom.mil/newslink/storyarchive/2008/JOE2008.pdf