T Nation

Should Athletes Lift Their 1RM?

[quote]Jay Sherman wrote:

I don’t suppose that’s Adonal Foyle who started this thread…?[/quote]

Yeah well you know my decline from 2.13 blocks per 18.8 minutes to 1.92 per 20.7 is kind of worrisome.

[quote]MikeShank wrote:
slotan, I respect what you said, because it is true. but given ego’s how many guys you know are going to do that. I know that when I am doing singles, I want to find out the most that I can do.
charles staley turned my onto the concept of strength reserve and that has been one of the hardest concepts for me to grasp because my attitude of “I gotta work till my body is about to explode” always seems to be getting in the way. It is only until recently that I have developed the maturity to leave a couple in the tank.[/quote]

Mike,

I just wanted to point out to the original poster that doing your 1RM and powerlifting are not necessarily the same thing.

Speaking of egos, I absolutely know what you mean. When working up to 3 or 5RM I often have the same problem. For instance, I do 3 solid reps, good form and I know I should probably rack the bar then. But I go for another rep and end up figthing it with the most atrocious form ever :slight_smile:

[quote]wufwugy wrote:
Jay Sherman wrote:
I certainly developed a much better vertical leap from doing power cleans 1 to 3 reps than I ever got from playing basketball everyday for hours.

why do you think that is?[/quote]

I assume you think because I simply gained strength. So let me add that when I did heavy squats and dls gaining 100 pounds on each it did nothing for my vertical. Didn’t hurt it, but didn’t help.

Further if you look at the most explosive players in the NBA they obviously aren’t training for maximum strength.

[quote]Jay Sherman wrote:
I assume you think because I simply gained strength. So let me add that when I did heavy squats and dls gaining 100 pounds on each it did nothing for my vertical. Didn’t hurt it, but didn’t help.

Further if you look at the most explosive players in the NBA they obviously aren’t training for maximum strength. [/quote]

so maximal strength developement has no place in building explosiveness?

In long range movements with a profound sticking point (Power Cleans) use the maximum weight possible. In somewhat shorter, or generally slower (Squat, bench) use 80-85% for triples. Percentages mean very different thing for lifts with different strength curves and range of motion.

Also, are you stong enough to reach your maximal level in your sport now?

All the Russian research says 70-90% for sets of 2-6 reps, but thats because lifters started to slow down their reps at that point. Avoid doing reps past the point where the bar does not accelerate at least a little throughout the ROM.

Even Westside lifters very rarely do true quasi-isometric maxes. Even board presses involve an accelerative range, and some is taken up in letting out the slack in the tendons.

[quote]wufwugy wrote:
so maximal strength developement has no place in building explosiveness?[/quote]

maximal strength has never been adequately defined. Take a one rep max on the bench. Lets just say 350. You could probably get 375 moving off your chest so its not 100% maximal at the bottom half of the bench. And when it is maximal (at the sticking point) it doesn’t do a very good job of making you stronger. If it did, then full range maximal benches with a hard fight throught the sticking point would be the best darn sticking point builder on the planet. The key to the Westside max effort work is that the muscles are briefly relaxed, and the tendons slackened slightly cutting of inhibitory reflexes at a point around the sticking point.

Hey Mike, I’m interested in hearing more on this strength reserve concept if you’ve got time to expound on it a little.