T Nation

Shoes For Overpronators?

So, anyone have any recommendations or comments about motion control/stability running shoes for overpronators? The best brand maybe, the longest lasting, etc.? Maybe where to find a cheap size fourteen?

I know Asics do a shoe over here called ‘The Beast’ It’s for the heavier over pronator. Is not cheap here, but we generally pay through the nose cause of import costs???

[quote]Plisskin wrote:
So, anyone have any recommendations or comments about motion control/stability running shoes for overpronators? The best brand maybe, the longest lasting, etc.? Maybe where to find a cheap size fourteen?[/quote]

New Balance MX854WN

I think you first need to get some type of orthodic. I don’t know how bad your problem is, but if it is mild it can probably be corrected by some over the counter product. Personally, I paid $400 for my custom orthodics and it was well worth it.

If you don’t have the money to get some type of device get a stiffer shoe. A neutral shoe bends really easily. I can’t think of the term right now, but try not to get a “neutral” shoe. Where I live there is a special shoe store that acesses the way you run and has all the shoes listed of what type they are.

Stop by a podiatrists office and ask if they have a list of recommended shoes. My Doc has a list that is undated twice a year.

The test my doc advises for a good shoe for an overpronator is 1.)that it has a rigid heel support 2.) if you hold the heel and toe and push them together the shoe does not bend through the arch and 3.) again holding the toe and the heel you should not be able to twist the shoe.

I’ve had good luck with Saucony’s,I believe it is the grid model, the beasts are a recommended shoe as well.

Also, once you find a good motion control shoe invest in a pair of good insoles (superfeet are on brand but there are others usually around $30). If you still have problems custom insoles from the podiatrist are the way to go, I love mine and my med. insurance paid for them, they are expensive otherwise (around $400,I think)

Good luck.

[quote]freshspecbluegt wrote:
I’ve had good luck with Saucony’s,I believe it is the grid model, the beasts are a recommended shoe as well.

[/quote]

I’ve had good luck with Saucony’s too.

I used to work in shoe sales for a while, and I used to run for stupidly long distances. Here are my recommendations based on previous experience:

Asics Gel Evolution ( one of the most comfortable shoes I’ve ever worn)

Brooks Beast ( heavy, but worth it for the flat footed)

Saucony Grid Hurricane

Mizuno Wave Rider (lighweight, since their main cushioning device is also the device for stability)

New Balance 991 (old school, but surprisingly good)

Adidas Supernova Control

Thanks for all the info…I’ve been wanting to get in some running, but its been years and the shin pain comes on fast. Right now I have the wrong shoes and all the surfaces I seem to come across without driving somewhere are pavement or uneven turf. I only recently learned that I had a choice in shoes for my big flat feet. I’ve simply put up with what I could find before now. I’m hoping I’ll really notice the difference.

I have to second the Brooks Beast recommendation, but don’t stop there. See a podiatrist and see if an orthodic would be a good addition as well.

B.

If you are having shin pain from running on hard surfaces, then you might benefit from shoes with a lot of cushion. But usually when talking about overpronation you are talking about arch problems. For arch problems you usually want to stop the pronation which means using motion control sneakers which are the opposite of cushiony, i.e. they are very firm.

It sounds like you are saying you have shin pain and you think it is caused by over pronation, correct? Do you know for sure that that is the cause? I thought that shin pain was very difficult to diagnose and the cause in most people is actually unknown.

Its all coming back to me. I saw a New Balance sales rep explain this on the golf channel.

If your feet are flat you want a soft sneaker. Because your feet are flat you have lost the natural shock absorbtion of the arch.

If your arch is high then you want the firm sneaker, i.e. pronation control.

If normal arch then you just want the sneaker in the middle, i.e. standard cushioning.

New Balance, and maybe other brands, are color coded. At the arch of the sneaker is darker the color the firmer the sneaker.

[quote]Plisskin wrote:
So, anyone have any recommendations or comments about motion control/stability running shoes for overpronators? The best brand maybe, the longest lasting, etc.? Maybe where to find a cheap size fourteen?[/quote]

Bad overpronator here. Check out New Balance 991s (think they’re now called 992s). It’s the only model of shoe I’ve worn for over four (maybe five?) years. Pricey, but it’s your feet, after all.

I also really liked the Saucony Jazz 6000. That’s the show I used when in the military and had to run a lot.

Low Arch (ie: flat feet) = over-pronator, therefore you want a Motion Control shoe

Medium Arch = Stability shoe

High Arch = Cushion shoe

Everyone wants cushioning, but you have to sacrifice cushioning for support if you have poor arches. Otherwise, you can get plantar fascitis, shin splints, and a number of other more serious ailments.

If you have a low arch then when you are running your foot follows the normal heel toe foot strike, but since there is no arch your foot rolls further inward than normal. This is called over-pronation, and this requires a shoe with reinforced support to prevent such a motion.

[quote]the42nd wrote:
Low Arch (ie: flat feet) = over-pronator, therefore you want a Motion Control shoe

Medium Arch = Stability shoe

High Arch = Cushion shoe

Everyone wants cushioning, but you have to sacrifice cushioning for support if you have poor arches. Otherwise, you can get plantar fascitis, shin splints, and a number of other more serious ailments.

If you have a low arch then when you are running your foot follows the normal heel toe foot strike, but since there is no arch your foot rolls further inward than normal. This is called over-pronation, and this requires a shoe with reinforced support to prevent such a motion.[/quote]

This is what I’ve been working from…it incredibly annoying to have flat feet.

I have a pair of size 14 New Balance 857, just ran the Chicago marathon in them with no problems. Find a running store in your area seek out the most experienced person there and have them fit you. You will probably pay at least $80, but well worth it.

Good Luck

Folks…help me out…what is overpronator?

Here’s a site which can give you a listing: http://www.roadrunnersports.com/rrs/mensshoes/mensshoesrunning/

Just click on the low arch section.

Depending on your weight, the Mizuno Wave Riders might be be a good idea. I was around 230 when I had a pair and found I still had knee trouble.

The Mizuno Renegade 3 might be a better fit.

First of all, why do you believe that you overpronate? Although many running injuries are invariably attributed to excessive pronation, the presence of such injuries should not be considered indicative of such. Also, low arches do not necessarily indicate overpronation. The arch of my right foot is about twice as high as the arch of my left foot, and the right foot actually pronates about twice as much as my left foot. And, it is the leg that pronates LESS that gets shin splints! So most of what you have heard about pronation is somewhere between overly simplistic and outright wrong.

With regard to footwear, it has been proven that conventional running shoes INCREASE pronation due to the raised heels and thick midsoles present in virtually all models. Motion control features do counter this somewhat, but the best way to prevent overpronation is to run barefoot or in shoes with very thin midsoles, rather than in thick-soled shoes with motion control features that interfere with the natrual biomechanics of the foot. The human foot attenuates force more effectively than ANY shoe.

If you insist on wearing motion control shoes, the primary features that reduce pronation are a wide last and a firm midsole in the midfoot and heel regions. What you do NOT want is a shoe with a soft midsole and a lot of cusioning. There are dozens of different models with varying degrees of pronation control, so I recommend you go to a running speciality store, where the staff will be trained to fit you with the best shoe for you.

Someone recommended the Brook’s Beast in a previous post. That shoe is at the ludicrous extreme end of the motion-control spectrm; it’s like a box of cement for your foot. IMO anyone who needs that much support probably should not be running at all.

As for podiatrists, I really dislike them because they tend to be zealous pushers of orthotics. And if you do not need orthotics, they can do you a lot of harm. Furthermore, most podiatrists spend their days pulling ingrown toenails and treating diabetic foot ulcers in geriatric patients- they really don’t know shit about running.

Find a store that specializes in running shoes (not the place playing hip-hop in the mall). Take the shoes you’ve been running in and let the most experienced person in the place help you. They can look at the wear patterns on your old shoes to help determine what type of shoes you need.

Adidas had a promotion a month or so ago (still may be going on) where you could buy a pair of their shoes, use them for a month and if not happy with them get your money back. The owner of the store I go to says most other brands will match this if you ask at the store.

If you don’t know a good running store in your area, check with some of your friends that run or a local running club.

[quote]belligerent wrote:
First of all, why do you believe that you overpronate? Although many running injuries are invariably attributed to excessive pronation, the presence of such injuries should not be considered indicative of such. Also, low arches do not necessarily indicate overpronation. The arch of my right foot is about twice as high as the arch of my left foot, and the right foot actually pronates about twice as much as my left foot. And, it is the leg that pronates LESS that gets shin splints! So most of what you have heard about pronation is somewhere between overly simplistic and outright wrong.

With regard to footwear, it has been proven that conventional running shoes INCREASE pronation due to the raised heels and thick midsoles present in virtually all models. Motion control features do counter this somewhat, but the best way to prevent overpronation is to run barefoot or in shoes with very thin midsoles, rather than in thick-soled shoes with motion control features that interfere with the natrual biomechanics of the foot. The human foot attenuates force more effectively than ANY shoe.

If you insist on wearing motion control shoes, the primary features that reduce pronation are a wide last and a firm midsole in the midfoot and heel regions. What you do NOT want is a shoe with a soft midsole and a lot of cusioning. There are dozens of different models with varying degrees of pronation control, so I recommend you go to a running speciality store, where the staff will be trained to fit you with the best shoe for you.

Someone recommended the Brook’s Beast in a previous post. That shoe is at the ludicrous extreme end of the motion-control spectrm; it’s like a box of cement for your foot. IMO anyone who needs that much support probably should not be running at all.

As for podiatrists, I really dislike them because they tend to be zealous pushers of orthotics. And if you do not need orthotics, they can do you a lot of harm. Furthermore, most podiatrists spend their days pulling ingrown toenails and treating diabetic foot ulcers in geriatric patients- they really don’t know shit about running.[/quote]

Excellent post’ particularly the part on the barefoot running recommendation (on natural surfaces). Check out MBT footwear as a means of correcting or at least conditioning the structures of the foot to work as they are supposed to.

here’s a link: http://www.swissmasaius.com/Default.aspx?lang=en-US

Think of the foot as your midsection and pay as much attention to stimulating the lower leg and foot as you would your abdominals and lumbar area!