T Nation

Shin Pain When Jogging/Running

I’ve recently started to jog/run to improve my cardiovascular endurance. So i get intense shin pain ( u know in the muscle in front of the shin- tibialis anterior) when jogging, and it starts a few minutes after i start and it gets worse and worse (like lactate accumulation sort of in the tibialis anterior) and it forces me to stop within minutes because i almost cannot run anymore!! what the hell? i mean i do have the cardiorespiratory endurance but my tibialis anterior aches, and burns (like lactic acid acciumulation) and it feels very stiff and it literally makes me stop a few minutes after because i am in agonizing pain!

What could this be? What can i do?

Could this be compartment syndrome :open_mouth: (i google and i found this). Do you think it could be sth serious?

[quote]acidhell wrote:
I’ve recently started to jog/run to improve my cardiovascular endurance. So i get intense shin pain ( u know in the muscle in front of the shin- tibialis anterior) when jogging, and it starts a few minutes after i start and it gets worse and worse (like lactate accumulation sort of in the tibialis anterior) and it forces me to stop within minutes because i almost cannot run anymore!! what the hell? i mean i do have the cardiorespiratory endurance but my tibialis anterior aches, and burns (like lactic acid acciumulation) and it feels very stiff and it literally makes me stop a few minutes after because i am in agonizing pain!

What could this be? What can i do?

Could this be compartment syndrome :open_mouth: (i google and i found this). Do you think it could be sth serious?[/quote]

I think its probably shin splints. Ice and rest.

If you have been sedentary for any serious length of time, and/or if you are overweight, you can’t just get into “running” all of a sudden and expect your shins to accept it.

If you are heavy, find something else to do until you lighten up.

If you are light, then you’ll have to work towards being a jogger/runner instead of just jumping into it.

Hmmm, no i really don’t think that its shin splints…

no i am light only 75kg! :slight_smile:

Its true though, that i never liked any endurance activites!

So do you think i can rule out anterior compartment syndrome?

A brief description of ACS:
Chronic compartment syndrome typically affects young people who are engaged in endurance sports. The primary clinical feature is a sensation of tightness or aching pain in a defined compartment of the affected limb, starting during activity or hours after activity ceases and lasting for varying lengths of time. The diagnosis is based on the history and on measurement of compartmental pressures. Fasciotomy or partial fasciectomy is the definitive treatment. Chronic compartment syndrome, first described by Mavor in 1956,[1] is a condition in which increased pressure within an enclosed space compromises circulation and tissue function within that space.[2] Unlike acute compartment syndrome, which generally occurs after trauma or burns, chronic compartment syndrome is usually an exercise-induced phenomenon.[2-4] It commonly affects the leg but has also been reported in the thigh, the hand and the forearm.

well, it seems to describe what i have, pretty well :frowning:

Sure, you could theoretically have something else, but why are you rejecting the common issue of shin splints?

I know you said it wasnt shin splints, but it sounds like it is to me. I’ve gotten them in the past.

Either way, i would check the surface you’re running on and your shoes. Pavement is murder on shin splints, like any hard surface. Try running in the grass versus pavement since it has a bit more cushion to it.

Second, the shoes. I dont know what you’re using, but if it isnt a real running shoe then you ought to look into getting some. Even old running shoes with lots of miles wont help you all that much. New shoes will cost you and depending on your weight and arch. I have flat feet and am 220 lbs so I have to get special shoes for it ranging at about $120. Since you’re lighter, and hopefully not flat footed, it would be cheaper, maybe around $60-$80.

Or you could just go barefoot in the grass. I’ve heard of people doing that before. Give that a whirl.

Oh don’t forget to stretch, ice, and rest.

It’s either what Vroom said, that you just need to get “broken in” or - maybe its your posture?

Think about how you hold your ankles while running, tight or loose? Maybe you’re running around with the anterior of your calves flexed. I’ve done this before with my right leg, and once gotten the muscle pump, realized my mistake and then let my ankle go more slack. You have to let it roll when you run.

Maybe that’s the trouble for you as well?

[quote]acidhell wrote:
I’ve recently started to jog/run to improve my cardiovascular endurance. So i get intense shin pain ( u know in the muscle in front of the shin- tibialis anterior) when jogging, and it starts a few minutes after i start and it gets worse and worse (like lactate accumulation sort of in the tibialis anterior) and it forces me to stop within minutes because i almost cannot run anymore!! what the hell? i mean i do have the cardiorespiratory endurance but my tibialis anterior aches, and burns (like lactic acid acciumulation) and it feels very stiff and it literally makes me stop a few minutes after because i am in agonizing pain!

What could this be? What can i do?

Could this be compartment syndrome :open_mouth: (i google and i found this). Do you think it could be sth serious?[/quote]

Alright, first thing you need to do is exam your running form. Most people who aren’t experienced runners tend to run incorrectly which can cause injuries - shin splints are a common one on the list. You can experience a fair amount of pain from shin splints, so before you start looking for a medical anomaly look at your running form first.

When you are running/jogging you need to land on your heel with your toe off the ground. Your foot then needs to roll from your heel to your toe. Some people advocate shorter strides and landing in the middle of your foot, either way it’s the rolling motion that reduces the impact on the shins and knees particularly. Do NOT land flat footed. If you’re not used to running in proper form, I’d accentuate the form as much as possible at first. It does feel a little funny, but if you want to avoid shin splints it’s the best way to go. Fair bit of warning, running/jogging like this will work your calves a lot more than you’re used to.

Take a week off of running before starting back up and do all you can to aid recovery.

Purensanity!, my running form is ok, i run loose, i am light on my feet and i jog pretty much the way you described. The feeling i get is like lactic acid accumulation in the tibialis anterior (almost leading into a cramp sort of), so much that it kinda makes me stop because it burns, the muscle feels very tight &swollen etc.

If i keep on going the pain will increase (its muscular pain!). I do not have flat feet either. Also my calves are feeling pretty sore after running but its not that big of a deal. The pain that i feel in my T.A during the activity making it INCREASINGLY difficult to dorsiflex, and shortly after it is my problem :smiley:

I wish i dont have ACS, maybe it’s not serious after all, but i don’t know.! And i rule out shin splints, because shin splints is actually an inflammation right?

Keep in mind that i ve recently started taking creatine, but i really doubt it contributes that much, because i remember i 'd get the same feeling before when i run a few rounds but less intense.

99% i Chronic Anterior compartment syndrome. I have all the symptoms. I also develop 2 small “fascial hernias” after the cessation of the activity, which is an indication of compartment syndrome :frowning:

damned. And i read that fasciectomy is the only choice.

I’m in the military and we run constantly. I know a lot of people who have gotten shin splints and injuries because of running form. I’ve helped several of them correct their problems. Unless you have ever really examined and focused on your running form, you probably could use improvements.

Shin splints can be caused by overtraining (or as some people will say under-recovery) and agitations in the connective tissue between the muscle and the bone.

So you’ll have to examine your training intensity, your body’s ability to recover, and your running form.

For example, you just started running so you’re going to be losing more water. You say you’re taking creatine which will increase your body’s need for water. Are you drinking enough water? Muscle cramps are one of the symptoms of heat exhaustion. Not being properly hydrated will also have an adverse effect on your body’s ability to heal and recover.

Anyway, the pain you’re describing is something that a lot of people have gone through when starting running programs. There can be a number of causes and reasons for the pain. Don’t freak out.

[quote]acidhell wrote:
The feeling i get is like lactic acid accumulation in the tibialis anterior (almost leading into a cramp sort of), so much that it kinda makes me stop because it burns, the muscle feels very tight &swollen etc.

If i keep on going the pain will increase (its muscular pain!). I do not have flat feet either. Also my calves are feeling pretty sore after running but its not that big of a deal. The pain that i feel in my T.A during the activity making it INCREASINGLY difficult to dorsiflex, and shortly after it is my problem :smiley:

I wish i dont have ACS, maybe it’s not serious after all, but i don’t know.![/quote]

Ok, get off it, you don’t have a disease. It sounds exactly as I was describing earlier.

You’re probably holding your ankle too stiff, resisting the natural roll of your foot by flexing the anterior muscle. Let that ankle roll, particularly in mid-lactic acid burn, you’ll feel the relief if this is the case.

Like someone said earlier in the post, you can’t just jump into running. I knew guys on my track team that couldn’t jog beacuse of shin splints. Work up to it.

Get a bucket of ice water and put your legs (up to the knee) into it for no more than 10 minutes. I would also recommend making sure you have good flexiblity/strength. Make sure your shoes are good. I had this problem when I first started running hard. I purchased orthodics and they helpd.

And for the love of God DON’T land on your heel first like someone said. I have no idea what this person is talking about.

I dont land on my heels! and the pain COMPLETELY subsides when the activity stops, and i really dont think its shin splints. In shin splints i think the pain is located deep inside or along the tibia or sth.

And as far as strength issues, i don’t know maybe it’s T.A weakness… I have very strong legs due to lots of O.L and squatting, though

I hopse it’s not chronic compartment syndrome :frowning: because the only solution will be fasciotomy.!

Dude…wtf is up with your chronic compartment symptom bs. Are you a doctor? or do you just like the sound of disease names? Just watch your jogging form, keep at it and rest adequately and you will be fine. The pain subsides after the activity ceases? Well guess what, once I put the weights down in the squat rack, the discomfort of pushing weights that threaten to staple me to the floor also ceases INMEDIATELY. Go figure…

so i’ll ask the obvious: you running on a treadmill?

if so, the mechanics are changed pretty dramatically from running on the road and may contribute even more to your problem.

and while i know you have your heart set on compartment syndrome, let’s not rule out stress fractures.

[quote]acidhell wrote:
Hmmm, no i really don’t think that its shin splints…[/quote]

Hmmm, I really do think its shin splints. when multiple possiblities present themselves, the simplest one tends to be the answer.
how about proving its not shin splints before overreacting and calling it somethin serious.
I’ve had shin splints, multiple times, and what you described fits the profile perfectly.

[quote]acidhell wrote:
In shin splints i think the pain is located deep inside or along the tibia or sth.
[/quote]

don’t be fooled by the name, shin splints don’t occur in the “shin bone” , the pain is actually due to the tendons tearing away from their insertion points along the bones.

Yes, the pain does go away right after.
Yes, it feels like the muscles because the tendons are attached to the muscles

don’t freak out about a blahblahosectimy until a doctor tells you you dont have shin splints, which i doubt he will