T Nation

Semi New Lifter Looking for Program Help


#1

Hey Guys,

I am currently looking for a 4 day 5x5 program. I guess it would be like a 5/3/1 program but in the 5x5 style format with adding 5LBS upperbody every workout/10LBS lower every workout..

Somthing like this? I am trying to find something fun/results but not on a 12 week rotation... As if i want to go on vacation it wont hurt me as much in my cycle.

Monday:
Bench
accessory work

Tuesday
Squat
accessory work

Thursday
Deadlift
accessory

Friday
Overhead Press
accessory work.


#2

So you want to do a program with a 5x5 rep scheme, focusing on the 4 main 5/3/1 lifts but with linear progression? It sounds like you’ve already written the program. Are you basically asking what assistance to do?


#3

I was wondering if anyone has seen a program set up like that or if it would even work?


#4

[quote]Millwrong12 wrote:
I was wondering if anyone has seen a program set up like that or if it would even work?[/quote]

I know a fairly successful powerlifter who does something similar.

day 1
bench - 5x5
dips
incline bench

day 2
squats - 5x5
front squats
leg curls

day 3
overhead press - 5x5
push press

day 4
deadlift - 5x5
weighted chinups
barbell rows

He also occasionally cycles in snatch pulls, rack pulls, pause squats and spoto press or drops all assistance work, depending on what he needs at that time. The issue with this training is that you must not add weight to your main exercise unless you get 5x5 with good form; this may mean using the same weights for weeks in a row.


#5

That looks like a classic bro split to me. I like it.


#6

It also looks remarkably like 5/3/1 5’s progression with a few down sets thrown in. I’d consider the 5/3/1 book just for ideas on the assistance if nothing else. In fact, if you call it 5’s pro instead of 5x5, you can get feedback direct from Jim himself, not that I think you need it particularly at this point.


#7

Looks good to me, over time you could make some adjustments based on your needs and weaknesses but that’s a pretty common approach to training.


#8

Doesn’t look like you can go too wrong with something like that.

IMO the hardest/trickiest part is always picking accessory work that will have the greatest carryover, but beyond that it looks fine.