T Nation

Semi-New Lifter Focusing on Basics

hi
i say semi new because ive lifted before but never seriously and never focused on the big compound movements. heres my workout, its heavy on squats and deadlifts. let me know what you guys think, and if theres anything i should change.
thanks

EXCERCISES:

day 1: legs

squat
deadlift
tippie toe lunges
abs

day 2: chest, biceps, triceps

bench press flat
dumbell press incline
dumbell flyes incline
pull up
ez bar curl
dips
1/2 way shoulder press (tri’s)

day 3: legs/ core

squat
deadlift
tippie toe lunges
abs

day 4: back/ shoulders/ lats

chin up
bent over rows
shoulder press
lawnmowers
bar to chin (holding a barbell, bring it up to chin and then back down to waist)
shoulders to ears (hold dumbells, try to touch shoulders to ears)

Atrocious.

Try including your stats, and goals. How else are we supposed to help you…?

Either way, unless you plan to enter a “tippie toe lunges” contest, this routine is terrible.

22 y/o, 175 lbs, 6 ft, between 20 and 30 % body fat. im skinny just have a small gut.

goal: between 200 and 220 at 6 - 8 %bf.

an explanation of why the routine is bad, and what any changes i can make would be very helpful.

thanks

First of all, squatting and deadlifting both twice a week, much less in the same workout, is not a very good idea. Especially because you also have an entirely different day where you’re doing bent rows and other back work.

You’re doing these exercises too often, and compounding too much work on your lower back throughout the week.

Secondly… pullups are not a bicep exercise, I don’t know why you have them in that second day, but the way this is set up you are actually working your back four times a week. Not good.

Thirdly… weenie exercises! They should be reserved for weenies… are you a weenie?

Tippie toe lunges? “Shoulders to ears”? 1/2 overhead presses? And I don’t even know what the hell a “lawnmower” is supposed to be.

There is a reason these aren’t traditional bodybuilding exercises.

Fourthly, deadlifts are traditionally considered a back exercise, not a leg exercise… although they do use the hamstrings, which I also noticed you seem to have no direct work for whatsoever?

And you aren’t working your calves? (unless that’s what these tippie toe lunges are supposed to do)

Here is the split, plus exercises, that I highly recommend you follow instead, to get you on the right track for a while until you’re experienced enough to make your own instinctual changes:

Day 1 - back/biceps
Deadlift
Pullups
Bent rows
Barbell curls
DB curls

Day 2 - chest/triceps
Bench press
Incline bench press
DB flyes
Dips
skullcrushers or pushdowns

Day 3 - Thighs/calves
Squats
leg press or front squats
Lunges
Lying leg curls
Calf raises (any kind)

Day 4 - Shoulders/traps
Overhead press (barbell or dumbbells)
DB lateral raises
DB rear delt raises
Barbell shrugs

This way everything gets an even amount of work, no muscle groups are conflicting, and the exercises allow for the most weight to be used, as well as the most direct stimulus upon the target muscle groups.

I hope I wasn’t too harsh.

The plan mr popular outlined looks like a good starting point for you to kick off in the right direction. If it turns out after a few weeks that you feel worn down, it could be a case of too much too soon. Watch your volume and monitor how well you’re able to recover. If due to time constraints or inadequate recovery the above plan doesn’t click with you, maybe consider a 3 day full body routine. You’d be able to make some nice solid gains on that on account of you’re just recently getting serious so theres some real potential to improve. Capitalize on this opportunity!

you’ll need to make tweaks here and there based on specific goals. Have a SMART goal(specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, timely. A big part of any goal is gonna be your nutrition.

Also, (obvious and a little off topic but i can’t resist…) One more thing i learned the hard way is don’t neglect mobility and strength deficits and imbalances. They will bite you in the ass down the road. I’m starting to ramble a bit, and stray beyond your question, hope this helped. Train hard and stay focused, you’ll be golden.

thanks ID.

Mr P, thanks for the input. your plan looks a lot better. i will follow it.

what do you guys think of sets and rep ammounts? 3 x 10?

pretty standard beginning set/rep scheme and a good starting point. Try it out and see how it treats you. Progressive overload is the name of the game whatever set/rep scheme you’re using. What I like about sets of 10 is the higher metabolic demand compared to lower reps (with a greater focus on strength).

Also, if you keep rest relatively low you’ll increase the metabolic cost of each workout substantially and shouldn’t be surprised to see favorable body composition changes.

Another benefit of 3x10 is its light enough that you can really focus on form and groove the movement so you’re much less likely to injure yourself when you decide to really jack up the weights. Hope this helps.

I recommend 3x5 for squat, bench, and deadlift, and 3x10 for everything else.

Good luck. Consistency is key.

[quote]mr popular wrote:
First of all, squatting and deadlifting both twice a week, much less in the same workout, is not a very good idea.[/quote]

actually i think it might be a good idea for him to do exactly that - following a ripp idea of alternating

m squat
w deadlift
f squat

m deadlift
w squat
f deadlift

i’ve done this and it is very nice for foundation building and big gains for someone who has never done them before.

[quote]SolidSnake5150 wrote:

what do you guys think of sets and rep ammounts? 3 x 10?
[/quote]

that might be good for 3 weeks. get you used to doing new exercises, allowing for good form and confidence.

consider going heavy then. and i favor the idea of setting reps and rest periods, allowing for however many sets it takes to achieve these reps.

after you have done these exercises for 3 weeks, pick something like 40 reps per exercise. and lets challenge you with a weight you can move with good speed and form for 6 reps. rest (45-75 range) and repeat.

avoid to failure; just stop when you can not keep a reasonable speed of movement and solid form. do as many sets as it takes to get your required reps.

[quote]thruxton45 wrote:
actually i think it might be a good idea for him to do exactly that - following a ripp idea of alternating

m squat
w deadlift
f squat

m deadlift
w squat
f deadlift

i’ve done this and it is very nice for foundation building and big gains for someone who has never done them before.
[/quote]

I would consider rippetoes okay for someone completely new to lifting weights, if they did it for maybe a month or two and then switched to a more traditional training program.

But even then, I do not believe it is NECESSARY, nor do I believe it is even advisable or in any way superior to just training normally right from the very beginning.

[quote]thruxton45 wrote:
that might be good for 3 weeks. get you used to doing new exercises, allowing for good form and confidence.

consider going heavy then. and i favor the idea of setting reps and rest periods, allowing for however many sets it takes to achieve these reps.

after you have done these exercises for 3 weeks, pick something like 40 reps per exercise. and lets challenge you with a weight you can move with good speed and form for 6 reps. rest (45-75 range) and repeat.

avoid to failure; just stop when you can not keep a reasonable speed of movement and solid form. do as many sets as it takes to get your required reps.
[/quote]

The main problem with everything you have here is that it isn’t conducive to rapid progress. It just isn’t necessary, and it will probably only slow somebody down - especially a beginner.

And on a sidenote, I would personally recommend you avoid instructing others to follow a training philosophy you’ve only been doing for 4 weeks, particularly a radical training philosophy like this one.

[quote]mr popular wrote:

And on a sidenote, I would personally recommend you avoid instructing others to follow a training philosophy you’ve only been doing for 4 weeks, particularly a radical training philosophy like this one.[/quote]

Tell Chad Waterbury, it’s his program ideas ;D

[quote]mr popular wrote:

I would consider rippetoes okay for someone completely new to lifting weights, if they did it for maybe a month or two and then switched to a more traditional training program.

But even then, I do not believe it is NECESSARY, nor do I believe it is even advisable or in any way superior to just training normally right from the very beginning.[/quote]

well he said “ive lifted before but never seriously and never focused on the big compound movements.” so that is basically someone completely new to lifting.

it’s a great program that i didn’t say was superior but it is for sure normal training.

i can tell already how you got your nickname; we are going to get along great on this forum.

Training for total reps, worrying about bar speed, and avoiding muscle failure are not normal bodybuilding training.

And in my opinion at least 2 of the 3 are going to hamper progress rather than encourage it.

I’m aware it is a Waterbury philosophy. I’m not a fan at all.

Glad you like my handle.