T Nation

Secret to Longevity ?


#1

Could restricting your calories without leading to malnutrition increase your life expectancy ? some people might think so:

http://www.jyi.org/news/nb.php?id=624

What are you feelings on this ?


#2

[quote]X7502 wrote:
Could restricting your calories without leading to malnutrition increase your life expectancy ? some people might think so:

http://www.jyi.org/news/nb.php?id=624

What are you feelings on this ?[/quote]

My feelings are that I have no desire to live to 100 unless my quality of life remains high. Living the longest is not all it is cracked up to be. Once all of your friends and family die, who do you get to brag to about how old you are? The nurses in the retirement home?

Life is short. You can be taken out this afternoon in a car accident making years of calorie restriction nothing but laughably ironic.


#3

I don’t like the trade off, small and whimpy for a longer pathetic live. Or big and strong with a furfilling life. I take the latter of the two.

Having said that and the fact that 80% of my customer at seniors. I have never met a large elderly person. I don’t know any large individuals over seventy.

I have heard that it is believed that the heart can’t pump blood to an extra large person as long as it can for a small person. So it is best to keep that ticker in awesome shape.


#4

[quote]streamline wrote:
I don’t like the trade off, small and whimpy for a longer pathetic live. Or big and strong with a furfilling life. I take the latter of the two.

Having said that and the fact that 80% of my customer at seniors. I have never met a large elderly person. I don’t know any large individuals over seventy.

I have heard that it is believed that the heart can’t pump blood to an extra large person as long as it can for a small person. So it is best to keep that ticker in awesome shape.[/quote]

I can agree with that, but then, the patients I see over 50 are usually on so many different medications just to keep them alive that blaming the longer life span on body weight is a tad simplistic. Medical science has progressed to the point that we can keep people alive much longer than they would have experienced even 50 years ago.

Blood thinners, BP medications, insulin, thyroid hormone, and anti-depressants are the usual barrel of pill boxes they bring into the clinic.

I am not sure that qualifies as “healthy in old age”.

Also, there are very few people on the planet who even lift weights seriously past the age of 30 which means larger individuals are usually represented as OBESE and not very muscular. That is a huge difference.


#5

[quote]Professor X wrote:

I am not sure that qualifies as “healthy in old age”.

Also, there are very few people on the planet who even lift weights seriously past the age of 30 which means larger individuals are usually represented as OBESE and not very muscular. That is a huge difference.[/quote]

I totally agree. We are the generation that will break down barriers and obliterate aging myths. I try to use common sense when I believe science and medicine are in my opinion wrong.

There is still so very much that needs to be learned. We as a people are not as smart as we think we are. Some of us however refuse to stop learning and testing new waters. It is those of us that will lead the way for those smart enough to follow.

We know alot of what doesn’t work. Now it’s time to figure out what does work. That’s the fun of it all, finding news ways to improve on what you have. I love doing this, I just feel so awesome all the time. Even then I feel like shit, I still feel awesome.


#6

Some of the older bodybuilders are getting close to 70 and still looking good. I think Serge Nubret is like what 69/70.


#7

[quote]EG wrote:
Some of the older bodybuilders are getting close to 70 and still looking good. I think Serge Nubret is like what 69/70.[/quote]

Good point. Arm chair experts swore that they would all die before they hit 50. Some competed well into their 60’s.


#8

What about all those people who eat without regard, drink in excess day in day out and who aren’t bothered to go to the gym?

Case in point:

Someone whose name i can’t mention - drank two thirds of a pint of whiskey everyday of his life since he was a young man, also he ate like no tomorrow and didn’t work a day in his life.

Yet he lived to the age of 90 with no major health problems.

I know there are exceptions but i’ve run into a fair few.


#9

Does calorie restriction really extend your life or does it just feel like it? If I had to choose between a shorter fun life or a longer miserable one I’ll take the fun please.

Of course I would prefer both!


#10

[quote]edn wrote:
Does calorie restriction really extend your life or does it just feel like it? If I had to choose between a shorter fun life or a longer miserable one I’ll take the fun please.

Of course I would prefer both![/quote]

I haven’t seen too many people at all hitting 100+ years old all because of their wonderful calorie restriction. Most of these people are going off of lab animal studies where every possible variable can be controlled.

Life isn’t like that outside of a cage and I am not sure there is a worst tragedy…or funnier comedy than someone spending 60+ years weighing all of 120lbs hoping they live longer only to die through unnatural causes,

Someone like that would have to avoid any above average risk through the rest of their life in hopes of avoiding that.

A life without risk isn’t really living. They make plastic bubbles for that.


#11

Live fast, die young and leave a beautiful corpse.


#12

I want to see a study on how physical training effects lifespan and health. I have a funny feeling my grandmother wouldn’t have so many back problems if she lifted more than grocery bags all her life. It’s no wonder your body starts to break down when it doesn’t have a reason to be built up.

Hell, my dick would probably fall off if I didn’t touch it so often.


#13

[quote]Vicomte wrote:
I want to see a study on how physical training effects lifespan and health. I have a funny feeling my grandmother wouldn’t have so many back problems if she lifted more than grocery bags all her life. It’s no wonder your body starts to break down when it doesn’t have a reason to be built up.

Hell, my dick would probably fall off if I didn’t touch it so often.[/quote]

It would…in effect. Regular masturbation and sex with a partner promote prostate health.


#14

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Vicomte wrote:
I want to see a study on how physical training effects lifespan and health. I have a funny feeling my grandmother wouldn’t have so many back problems if she lifted more than grocery bags all her life. It’s no wonder your body starts to break down when it doesn’t have a reason to be built up.

Hell, my dick would probably fall off if I didn’t touch it so often.

It would…in effect. Regular masturbation and sex with a partner promote prostate health.[/quote]

My respect for you just went up ten-fold.


#15

[quote]Makavali wrote:
Professor X wrote:
Vicomte wrote:
I want to see a study on how physical training effects lifespan and health. I have a funny feeling my grandmother wouldn’t have so many back problems if she lifted more than grocery bags all her life. It’s no wonder your body starts to break down when it doesn’t have a reason to be built up.

Hell, my dick would probably fall off if I didn’t touch it so often.

It would…in effect. Regular masturbation and sex with a partner promote prostate health.

My respect for you just went up ten-fold.[/quote]

MASTURBATION: Professor X says it’s OK.


#16

my question would be why would someone want to live past the age of 60 or 70

when i can’t do regular day to day activities anymore without constant assistance i would lose the will to live

the constantly decreasing ratio of working people:senior citizens is also something to consider, you can say “we must improve the lives of the elderly” but in the end someone has to pay

the U.S. are in a 50 trillion (with a T) dollar hole from their medicare and social security obligations (and you thought a 10 trillion debt was the worst of your problems) to retiring baby boomers,

Except the government actually has zero invested in these funds, the hole is growing 2-3 trillion each year and no you won’t find any news of it on the news networks


#17

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Vicomte wrote:
I want to see a study on how physical training effects lifespan and health. I have a funny feeling my grandmother wouldn’t have so many back problems if she lifted more than grocery bags all her life. It’s no wonder your body starts to break down when it doesn’t have a reason to be built up.

Hell, my dick would probably fall off if I didn’t touch it so often.

It would…in effect. Regular masturbation and sex with a partner promote prostate health.[/quote]

Cool! I must have one of the healthiest prostate’s around!


#18

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.


#19

In the animal world I think longer life spans are correlated to a low ratio of metabolic expenditure to body weight. The lower the number the higher the life expectancy.

Aging is a cellular phenomena and there is no reason why cells should have to age at all. With the right technology we could provide restorative capabilities to all of our cells; in fact, that is all that aging is – the inability for the body to restore its organs’ cells to a normal functioning capacity and number.

If we think about what a metabolism is we can understand how it might affect our cells’ recovery processes. More energy and nutrients can be devoted to cell regeneration if we are able to store more nutrients in a larger body. A slow metabolism would ensure that energy is being distributed to the organs as needed instead of being burned off as heat when we are in a sedentary state.

To echo the OP I think a high nutrient low-calorie diet would be effective in achieving a lower metabolism. Training with weights would ensure that our body mass remains dense so we can store those nutrients.

Also, I think one characteristic that is important to a longer life is the pace of life one has – meaning, are we always rushed and in a hurry to get to the next appointment; do we take time for ourselves to slow down and just relax? Being in a constant state of stress cannot be good in this regard.


#20

[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
The irony of living a calorie restricted lifestyle (to the degree that the extensionists do), is that the accelerated myopenia (age related loss of muscle mass) leaves the old person even less functionally able than the equivalent age normal (read: sedentary) individual and markedly less than someone who resistance trains.

So they might be old, but they’ll have to enjoy it from a wheelchair, most likely.

Age for age’s sake… what a waste of a life.

Better to live one day as a lion than 100 years as a sheep
-Old Italian saying

BBB[/quote]

fxd