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Season or Series?

Up until a couple of years ago a series of episodes on a tv show was called just that, a series. Now it seems series’ are being called seasons.

This is still a fairly new thing in the UK but I believe it has been used in the US for a while longer.

The question is, I heard on some advert on tv someone say ‘season one of the series’… â?¢_â?¢ wtf?

I caught myself saying season the other day and felt disappointed, like I had succumbed.

[quote]lemony2j wrote:
Up until a couple of years ago a series of episodes on a tv show was called just that, a series. Now it seems series’ are being called seasons.

This is still a fairly new thing in the UK but I believe it has been used in the US for a while longer.

The question is, I heard on some advert on tv someone say ‘season one of the series’… â?¢_â?¢ wtf?

I caught myself saying season the other day and felt disappointed, like I had succumbed.[/quote]

I also have fallen ill to this. :frowning: I find if im talking about old Tv Shows like friends i’ll say series… but new stuff it’s become ‘Season’

I’m not sure I get it. Take a show like Seinfeld with 10+ years of episodes - in England, how would you refer to the episodes, say, in 2006…as a “series”? How then would you refer to the entire body of work?

A season is a collection of consecutively-aired episodes, usually anywhere from 8-20+ (Couple exceptions to this like Walking Dead with mid-season hiatuses). Then there is a break of several months to film new episodes, and a new season commences. The entire collection of seasons is the series.

Example: The series Breaking Bad has announced it is going to wrap everything up in 5 seasons. Soon, the fifth season of the series is going to air. Does that makes sense?

[quote]PimpBot5000 wrote:
I’m not sure I get it. Take a show like Seinfeld with 10+ years of episodes - in England, how would you refer to the episodes, say, in 2006…as a “series”? How then would you refer to the entire body of work?

A season is a collection of consecutively-aired episodes, usually anywhere from 8-20+ (Couple exceptions to this like Walking Dead with mid-season hiatuses). Then there is a break of several months to film new episodes, and a new season commences. The entire collection of seasons is the series.

Example: The series Breaking Bad has announced it is going to wrap everything up in 5 seasons. Soon, the fifth season of the series is going to air. Does that makes sense? [/quote]

In England a series is a collection of episodes.

We don’t have a name for a collection of series’ … i don’t think.

In England, traditionally we’d have the 1st/2nd/3rd… series of a programme.

I say season/series now though, and at first I felt like I’d succumbed to the might of US English. It’s like how Friends replaced “bloody hell” with “oh my God!” :wink:

I heard that some Americans now talk about going “on holiday”, so it works both ways.

In the UK most shows are labeled as “Series 1, Series 2, ETC”. It’s the equivalent of the US season.

In the US a series is the entire collection of every episode. So The Series of a show could have 7 seasons. We have season finalies and series finalies, the series being the end of the show, for ever.

Dr Who 2005 is on Series 7.

It’s very confusing if you think too hard on it. They almost all get listed as SxxExx so series or season would make sense. They also get listed as S.E so 7.12 would be series/season 7 episode 12.

You’re right about it getting confusing, because ‘season’ is creeping its way in to our (english UK) day-to-day tv watching it feels more normal to say that instead of series. But then when someone refers to a series I’m not sure if that means in the traditional English sense of the word (season) or an entire body of work.

Apart from that, I think what bugs me most is hearing English people using an Americanism like that.
No offence my American T-brethren!

You Englishmen and your crazy fucking language.

[quote]Diddy Ryder wrote:
In England, traditionally we’d have the 1st/2nd/3rd… series of a programme.

I say season/series now though, and at first I felt like I’d succumbed to the might of US English. It’s like how Friends replaced “bloody hell” with “oh my God!” :wink:

I heard that some Americans now talk about going “on holiday”, so it works both ways.[/quote]

I’ve never heard any American say that. We still call it soccer. And when I mention football and the premiership I might as well not be speaking English.

Also, there’s no “e” in program :wink:

[quote]PaddyM wrote:

Also, there’s no “e” in program ;)[/quote]
They spell that the French way, just to spite us.

[quote]Diddy Ryder wrote:
I heard that some Americans now talk about going “on holiday”, so it works both ways.[/quote]
Yeah I have seen that creepin a little bit.

I’ve gotten into the habit of saying “could do” when somebody suggests something. I’m pretty sure that’s a British thing.

[quote]csulli wrote:

[quote]Diddy Ryder wrote:
I heard that some Americans now talk about going “on holiday”, so it works both ways.[/quote]
Yeah I have seen that creepin a little bit.

I’ve gotten into the habit of saying “could do” when somebody suggests something. I’m pretty sure that’s a British thing.[/quote]

Damn right it is.

U know what winds me up? When people say ‘get off of me’ or ‘get off of him’ Why not just ‘get off me’ ?

[quote]Marzouk wrote:

[quote]csulli wrote:

[quote]Diddy Ryder wrote:
I heard that some Americans now talk about going “on holiday”, so it works both ways.[/quote]
Yeah I have seen that creepin a little bit.

I’ve gotten into the habit of saying “could do” when somebody suggests something. I’m pretty sure that’s a British thing.[/quote]

Damn right it is.

U know what winds me up? When people say ‘get off of me’ or ‘get off of him’ Why not just ‘get off me’ ?[/quote]

I actually think there is some merit to that. “Get off of me”, to me, implies that the speaker is being physically touched by someone or even has someone laying on top of them. “Get off me” and similar variants may refer to the speaker being bothered verbally by another.

i.e.

“Get off my back” - common expression used by someone being nagged verbally by another person

“Get off of my back” - common expression in american football dog piles after the play is over and players are slow to get up

[quote]PaddyM wrote:

[quote]Diddy Ryder wrote:
In England, traditionally we’d have the 1st/2nd/3rd… series of a programme.

I say season/series now though, and at first I felt like I’d succumbed to the might of US English. It’s like how Friends replaced “bloody hell” with “oh my God!” :wink:

I heard that some Americans now talk about going “on holiday”, so it works both ways.[/quote]

I’ve never heard any American say that. We still call it soccer. And when I mention football and the premiership I might as well not be speaking English.

Also, there’s no “e” in program ;)[/quote]

There are lots of others creeping in, ‘Awesome’ being the latest. And I get called dude a lot these days, I don’t like it. Im just waiting to hear someone say they’ve gotta take a rain check so I can slap the upside their head, I had to google that because I kept hearing it on tv.

And it will ALWAYS be football, don’t get me started! Do NFL players have exclusive use of their feet? Although as I type I’m thinking our most popular football tv show over here is Soccer AM… What’s that all about? GO FIGURE!

Now I used to live in England but now I get into little arguments about calling the way they number floors in the UK.

If you walk into a department store they call it the Ground Floor…OK, that’s fine;it is the floor that’s on the ground…but they go and call the next floor up the FIRST FLOOR!!!

No! That’s now the second floor! The one you decided to call the Ground was the first floor too so the one after that is the second one.

What about going to the 13th floor in the US? You press the button numbered 14.

[quote]lemony2j wrote:
Apart from that, I think what bugs me most is hearing English people using an Americanism like that.
No offence my American T-brethren![/quote]

I feel the same about the reverse, like Americans saying they’re standing “in the queue” or that they’re going “on holiday.” Makes them sound like pretentious assholes.

exchange of ideas and conventions is always good

Awww man.
I thought this was going to be a discussion of Downton Abbey.

Cheers.

[quote]Nards wrote:
Now I used to live in England but now I get into little arguments about calling the way they number floors in the UK.

If you walk into a department store they call it the Ground Floor…OK, that’s fine;it is the floor that’s on the ground…but they go and call the next floor up the FIRST FLOOR!!!

No! That’s now the second floor! The one you decided to call the Ground was the first floor too so the one after that is the second one.[/quote]

The english have it right. They think like programmers not laymen.
You start counting with 0 not 1.

Which drive is that. It’s drive zero, the next is cride 1, and so on.
So which floor is that? The ground floor(floor zero), the next floor is the first floor(floor 1).