T Nation

Scientific Articles and Becoming a PT

Just a few short questions:

I’m trying to learn so I’m reading books, this site, ect. But I keep seeing that a lot of people are reading “scientific articles.” I have access to these kind of articles through my college library but I’m not really sure where to start. Any suggestions on good ones to start with?

To all the real trainers out there: Before and after you took your certification test, what did you do to get the ball rolling? I’m studying for mine right now and I want to be ready to go right to work with it. I’m still a good 2 months out from taking my test so I want to have options when it happened.

So far, just yesterday I picked up hours at the desk of my gym. It’s a hole-in-the-wall type place but it’s my kind of place and there are a lot of different people who come through the door. I figure I can get to know some of them and, after I get certified, maybe build some of my beginning clientele out of them.

I also went to the big money gym in town with all their brand new equipment, trainers in their mid- to late- 20’s, all with a bunch of degrees I have trouble pronouncing, and talked to the Manager. He is going to let me come in for 2 hours a week for 15 hours total (I know, it doesn’t add up, but that’s what he said) and be able to talk with the trainers, ask questions, and I guess they are going to give me workout passes so that I can “be there and observe.”

It’s not where I want to be, I actually kind of hate that gym just because of their money and the absolute smugness you see when you walk in but hey, it’s something else.

Most of the people even discussing “scientific articles” don’t have the background to even understand what they are reading in detail.

Further, there is a difference between an “article” and a “study”.

I am personally a little irritated by people misunderstanding or misrepresenting scientific data all in the name of fitness.

98% of the time it seem to be some rat study that some personal trainer has now used to create a whole EXPENSIVE system of training that has been “proven”…on rats.

lol at science

sits on prof’s lap

Op: Get yer ass under the bar first. There are so many trainers and most are shit. Truthfully, the busiest trainers usually are the ones with the best physiques regardless of their knowledge. If you wanna be successful you better look the part.

Science is like religion in the sense that both can be twisted and misunderstood. If somebody claims to speak in the name of either one, but refuses to listen, then they don’t really understand what the hell they are talking about in the first place.

[quote]dnlcdstn wrote:
Op: Get yer ass under the bar first. There are so many trainers and most are shit. Truthfully, the busiest trainers usually are the ones with the best physiques regardless of their knowledge. If you wanna be successful you better look the part. [/quote]

Agreed. When you stand out in the crowd people notice. And honestly, take some of exercise physiology courses and learn to apply that to your training first and then to any clients’ training. If you look the part and can back it up with actually knowing your asshole from a hole in the ground that just adds to your resume.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Most of the people even discussing “scientific articles” don’t have the background to even understand what they are reading in detail.

[/quote]

I’m going to have to agree w/ PX for a change. I took Anatomy, Physiology, Exercise Physiology and Kinesiology and I can’t keep the Anatomical position straight. If an author starts talking Sagittal Planes, distal, proximal etc etc I start mumbling “english muthafukah”

[quote]dnlcdstn wrote:
Op: Get yer ass under the bar first. There are so many trainers and most are shit. Truthfully, the busiest trainers usually are the ones with the best physiques regardless of their knowledge. If you wanna be successful you better look the part. [/quote]

I actually have the quote “Get your ass under the bar” on the wall in my room. I heard it from somewhere, I think it was Dave Tate, and thought “well that’s a good, no bullshit kinda way to look at it?” I’m in the gym at least 5 times a week and have been for the past 2 years or so. I’m not claiming to know a lot about anything but I’m finding out more and more all the time. And I’m not just doing bullshit work either. I go in with a plan, do it till I win and the weight looses, then go back later to my log book and see what worked and what didn’t.

Even if being a trainer isn’t in the cards, I’m in it for me. I’m going to put up 300 on the bench and I’ve already started messing around with the deadlift and that’s going to get serious here pretty soon. I’m in it for the long haul. The PT thing is just because I love it so much I figured I might try and make a business out of it.

scientific articles are great but you have to be careful, unless you know what your looking at it can very difficult to get what the author is saying. scientific writing is quite a bit different from what most people are use to reading. if you want to start just try searching for something that you find interesting then just look through the reference section and continue. but you should really find someone that knows how to read the stuff to help you out

[quote]on edge wrote:
I’m going to have to agree w/ PX for a change. I took Anatomy, Physiology, Exercise Physiology and Kinesiology and I can’t keep the Anatomical position straight. If an author starts talking Sagittal Planes, distal, proximal etc etc I start mumbling “english muthafukah”[/quote]

No offense intended, but if after studying all that you can’t tell proximal from distal, you mustn’t have been much of a student.

OP: Review articles would be a good place to start to gain an overview of a topic. You could also search for articles authored by T-Nation writers you’re a fan of. For example, search for Ziegenfuss and Lowery in pubmed and you’ll come up with the latest ISSN review, which is definitely worth a read.

Then again, without the adequate scientific background necessary to understand all of it, delving into peer-reviewed literature would likely end up doing you more harm than good.

Learn to sell yourself. You can have all of the training and diet knowledge in the world, but if you don’t present yourself properly, no one will buy it.

[quote]Cimmerian wrote:

[quote]on edge wrote:
I’m going to have to agree w/ PX for a change. I took Anatomy, Physiology, Exercise Physiology and Kinesiology and I can’t keep the Anatomical position straight. If an author starts talking Sagittal Planes, distal, proximal etc etc I start mumbling “english muthafukah”[/quote]

No offense intended, but if after studying all that you can’t tell proximal from distal, you mustn’t have been much of a student.

[/quote]

Offense intended, your an idiot.

Everyone knows if you don’t use stuff like that you lose it. Yeah i can figure it out but I have to put my mind to it and i don’t want to have to concentrate that hard when reading an article. I got A’s in both Anatomy and Kinesiology.

The reserach on strength training/bodybuilding is highly equivocal. You can find a study to “prove” almost anything.

[quote]SkyzykS wrote:
Learn to sell yourself. You can have all of the training and diet knowledge in the world, but if you don’t present yourself properly, no one will buy it.

[/quote]

x2.

And the results to back it up. Create testimonials. Sales is tiring to do by yourself, let your clients “sell” you too.