T Nation

Saturated Fat : Eat Up!

“On December 24, 1997, headlines around the world proclaimed that saturated fat lowers rate of strokes. This pronouncement came after the publication of a 20-year study performed by Dr. Matthew Gillman and colleagues at Harvard Medical School and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study involved 832 men aged 45 through 65 years of age who were initially free of cardiovascular disease. The results of the study raised howls of protest from health experts who had spent years telling us to eat less saturated fat. Yet many researchers familiar with fat metabolism and cardiovascular disease were not surprised at the results of this study.”

Turns out the VEGETABLE OILS are the culprit.

http://www.preventionisbest.com/site/saturatedfat.html

This makes sense. Our consumption of butter, bacon, and so forth is down, but disease states increase.

Hmmm, bacon! :slight_smile:

Coconut oil which is a saturated fat is one of the best fats for you. Has lots of lauric acid. Get the extra virgin kind if you can. On top of that, it is the most stable oil to cook with at high temperatures. It also contains caprylic acid. However, palm oil (another maligned saturated oil) has even more caprylic acid (but less lauric acid) than coconut oil.

[quote]entheogens wrote:
Coconut oil which is a saturated fat is one of the best fats for you. Has lots of lauric acid. Get the extra virgin kind if you can. On top of that, it is the most stable oil to cook with at high temperatures. It also contains caprylic acid. However, palm oil (another maligned saturated oil) has even more caprylic acid (but less lauric acid) than coconut oil.[/quote]

I agree. I eat at least 2-4 Tablespoons of organic unrefined coconut oil a day. It’s some great stuff. I remember when they were saying coconut oil was bad for you.
Boy, how far we’ve come.

Coconut Oil is one that’s good for you. What surprises most people is that its the cooking oils that’s the villain in all this. You can eat meat, cheese, and so forth (in moderation) and its actually good for you.

Anyone have a good link about the impact of most vegetable oils on health?

Vegetable oils such as what? Olive oil and safflower oil are very healthy. [if you’re considering them vegetable oils] Canola oil gets more mixed reviews. I’ve heard some bad things about corn oil. Partially hydrogenated oil of any kind is bad.

Olive oil is OK in until you go up above 200 degrees. Now you have created a trans fat in your kitchen. Never cook with any oil other than quality coconut oil. It is also important to note that the quality of coconut oil is VERY important. Never use any that is from dried coconuts.

[quote]jsbrook wrote:
Vegetable oils such as what? Olive oil and safflower oil are very healthy. [if you’re considering them vegetable oils] Canola oil gets more mixed reviews. I’ve heard some bad things about corn oil. Partially hydrogenated oil of any kind is bad.[/quote]

Get the extra-virgin coconut oil. They sell it at Whole Foods.

I can’t recommend the Weston Price Foundation enough. Here’s a line to a report given by biochemist Mary Enig on Coconut Oil:

http://www.westonaprice.org/knowyourfats/coconut_oil.html

That’s not true about olive oil. It’s impossible to heat it to the degree necessary to hydrogenate it in a home kitchen. I’ve posted about this before.

[quote]designinme wrote:
Olive oil is OK in until you go up above 200 degrees. Now you have created a trans fat in your kitchen. Never cook with any oil other than quality coconut oil. It is also important to note that the quality of coconut oil is VERY important. Never use any that is from dried coconuts.

jsbrook wrote:
Vegetable oils such as what? Olive oil and safflower oil are very healthy. [if you’re considering them vegetable oils] Canola oil gets more mixed reviews. I’ve heard some bad things about corn oil. Partially hydrogenated oil of any kind is bad.

[/quote]

Olive pomace oil and virgin olive oil are both highly monounsaturated oils and therefore resistant to oxidation and hydrogenation. Studies have shown oxidation and hydrogenation occurs to a lesser degree in olive oil than in other oils. But in any case, the amount of hydrogenation is miniscule and no home cook would ever experience this problem.

The large refinery-like factories which take unsaturated vegetable oil and turn it into margarine or vegetable lard do so by bubbling hydrogen gas through 250 to 400 degree hot vegetable oil in the presence of a metal catalyst, usually nickel or platinum. The process takes several hours. You cannot make a saturated product like margarine at home by heating olive oil or any other vegetable oil in a pan. I don’t know where this weird notion has come from.

I love extra virign coconut oil. Tastes great. Good for you. Somehow I feel like it almost has a mild stimulant effect, too. Though I don’t know why this would be.

High cholesterol doesn’t cause CHD,
Saturated fat doesn’t raise cholesterol.

This has been known for years.

[quote]jsbrook wrote:
That’s not true about olive oil. It’s impossible to heat it to the degree necessary to hydrogenate it in a home kitchen. I’ve posted about this before.

[/quote]

jsbrook,
Can you lead me to an article about this topic?(or at least the thread you posted about this.) I always cook with olive oil and had not heard about any problems cooking with it until this thread.
Thanks

This is true. I remember learning this during school.
However, I still prefer coconut oil for medium/high heat because I think it just tastes better.
Have you tried cooking with coconut oil when cooking fish? It really adds some texture and flavor to sea food.

[quote]jsbrook wrote:
Olive pomace oil and virgin olive oil are both highly monounsaturated oils and therefore resistant to oxidation and hydrogenation. Studies have shown oxidation and hydrogenation occurs to a lesser degree in olive oil than in other oils. But in any case, the amount of hydrogenation is miniscule and no home cook would ever experience this problem.

The large refinery-like factories which take unsaturated vegetable oil and turn it into margarine or vegetable lard do so by bubbling hydrogen gas through 250 to 400 degree hot vegetable oil in the presence of a metal catalyst, usually nickel or platinum. The process takes several hours. You cannot make a saturated product like margarine at home by heating olive oil or any other vegetable oil in a pan. I don’t know where this weird notion has come from.

I love extra virign coconut oil. Tastes great. Good for you. Somehow I feel like it almost has a mild stimulant effect, too. Though I don’t know why this would be.
[/quote]

Yes, Cthulhu. I like coconut oil for cooking as well. Sometimes I’ll even eat a teaspoon straight! Superdad, I’ll be out the rest of the day. But when I get a chance, I’ll try to find a scientific article for you. I imagine just a google search would bring some up.

[quote]Cthulhu wrote:
This is true. I remember learning this during school.
However, I still prefer coconut oil for medium/high heat because I think it just tastes better.
Have you tried cooking with coconut oil when cooking fish? It really adds some texture and flavor to sea food.
jsbrook wrote:
Olive pomace oil and virgin olive oil are both highly monounsaturated oils and therefore resistant to oxidation and hydrogenation. Studies have shown oxidation and hydrogenation occurs to a lesser degree in olive oil than in other oils. But in any case, the amount of hydrogenation is miniscule and no home cook would ever experience this problem.

The large refinery-like factories which take unsaturated vegetable oil and turn it into margarine or vegetable lard do so by bubbling hydrogen gas through 250 to 400 degree hot vegetable oil in the presence of a metal catalyst, usually nickel or platinum. The process takes several hours. You cannot make a saturated product like margarine at home by heating olive oil or any other vegetable oil in a pan. I don’t know where this weird notion has come from.

I love extra virign coconut oil. Tastes great. Good for you. Somehow I feel like it almost has a mild stimulant effect, too. Though I don’t know why this would be.

[/quote]

Alright guys I was at the health food store today getting some blackstrap molasses and decided to checkout the extra virgin coconut oil. My eyeballs almost fell outta my head when I saw the price. Hideously expensive. Like 15 bux for 16 ounces. I Dunno, I can’t afford that regularly so I didn’t get it.

[quote]jsbrook wrote:
Vegetable oils such as what? Olive oil and safflower oil are very healthy. [/quote]

Why safflower oil? Most get plenty of omegas 6s, why take in any more?

[quote]Tiribulus wrote:
Alright guys I was at the health food store today getting some blackstrap molasses and decided to checkout the extra virgin coconut oil. My eyeballs almost fell outta my head when I saw the price. Hideously expensive. Like 15 bux for 16 ounces. I Dunno, I can’t afford that regularly so I didn’t get it.[/quote]

High quality, low price coconut oil:http://www.wildernessfamilynaturals.com/

No need to. I have already studied about the science behind it. Very interesting. I sometimes eat it straight out of the jar too. Or mix it with coconut juice and meat and make a palatable smoothie.

So, you’re a dad huh? How many kids?

[quote]jsbrook wrote:
Yes, Cthulhu. I like coconut oil for cooking as well. Sometimes I’ll even eat a teaspoon straight! Superdad, I’ll be out the rest of the day. But when I get a chance, I’ll try to find a scientific article for you. I imagine just a google search would bring some up.

Cthulhu wrote:
This is true. I remember learning this during school.
However, I still prefer coconut oil for medium/high heat because I think it just tastes better.
Have you tried cooking with coconut oil when cooking fish? It really adds some texture and flavor to sea food.
jsbrook wrote:
Olive pomace oil and virgin olive oil are both highly monounsaturated oils and therefore resistant to oxidation and hydrogenation. Studies have shown oxidation and hydrogenation occurs to a lesser degree in olive oil than in other oils. But in any case, the amount of hydrogenation is miniscule and no home cook would ever experience this problem.

The large refinery-like factories which take unsaturated vegetable oil and turn it into margarine or vegetable lard do so by bubbling hydrogen gas through 250 to 400 degree hot vegetable oil in the presence of a metal catalyst, usually nickel or platinum. The process takes several hours. You cannot make a saturated product like margarine at home by heating olive oil or any other vegetable oil in a pan. I don’t know where this weird notion has come from.

I love extra virign coconut oil. Tastes great. Good for you. Somehow I feel like it almost has a mild stimulant effect, too. Though I don’t know why this would be.

[/quote]

I remember so vividly all the bullshit when i was growing up about ‘oil will kill you’. Of course i still had to eat it cos i was poor, but that was mostly margarine on toast.

Now, any oil i can get, i love. And i agree with jsbrook. When i drink some fishoil, or olive oil, i get a buzz like ‘zzzzzu’ like i’m recharged or something. Good shit

[quote]entheogens wrote:
Coconut oil which is a saturated fat is one of the best fats for you. Has lots of lauric acid. Get the extra virgin kind if you can. On top of that, it is the most stable oil to cook with at high temperatures. It also contains caprylic acid. However, palm oil (another maligned saturated oil) has even more caprylic acid (but less lauric acid) than coconut oil.[/quote]

Randomly, it’s also great for the skin!

I’ve made soaps using coconut butter and the results are nice.