T Nation

Safe Bicep Exericses

Obviously no exercise is safe if not done with correct form, but I have been told by people on here and on other forums that the incline DB curl is not the most safe for the shoulder joint and bicep tendon. Obviously standing BB curls are great, but what else is safe(ish) to add?

I was thinking some 21’s with a BB standing?

I currently do 4 sets of BB curls and 4 sets of inclines, but it may be tiem for change.

I can honestly say with 100% certainty that I’ve never considered the safety of a biceps exercise.

[quote]Ronsauce wrote:
I can honestly say with 100% certainty that I’ve never considered the safety of a biceps exercise.[/quote]

I would echo what Ron is saying here.

You’re on a roll with these threads… Seriously, kid, beginners’ section.

[quote]mr popular wrote:
Ronsauce wrote:
I can honestly say with 100% certainty that I’ve never considered the safety of a biceps exercise.

I would echo what Ron is saying here.[/quote]

X3, this would be my last concern, you have to really fuckup to make a bicep exercise not safe.

Pussy.

Biceps exercise?
Are you crazy?!
I wouldn’t advise someone to leave the house these days (murderers, rapists, gays, aliens, brutalized animals, crashing planes and north-korean satellite debris are all waiting for you) let alone work out!

It’s just waaay too unsafe.

Really, a guy on youtube said that.

In the comment section.

Unless you have a pre-existing condition that makes you have to find a “safe” exercise for biceps then I wouldn’t worry.

Folks don’t tear biceps doing curls, man.

They tear them picking up Atlas stones, doing deadlifts with bent arms, etc.

It takes a lot more weight than most can curl to tear a biceps.

Not true if you have a pre-existing shoulder problems. Incline db curls rape my shoulder, but my surgery did affect the insertion of the bicep tendon.

I suffer no pain from preachers, concentration, barbell, reverse, and hammer curls. Only the seated incline bother me. I say if it hurts avoid it, but if you still want to hit the long head of the bicep harder, do a preacher curl with your hands close together and really flare out your elbows.

[quote]Ghost22 wrote:
Unless you have a pre-existing condition that makes you have to find a “safe” exercise for biceps then I wouldn’t worry.

Folks don’t tear biceps doing curls, man.

They tear them picking up Atlas stones, doing deadlifts with bent arms, etc.

It takes a lot more weight than most can curl to tear a biceps. [/quote]

damn it, you beat me to it

if you get forearm pain from curls you need to get the forearms stronger with revese curls, grip work, and levering.

Anything but a curl.

[quote]schultzie wrote:
if you get forearm pain from curls you need to get the forearms stronger with revese curls, grip work, and levering.[/quote]

^^^^ This.

I would also add finger extensor exercises. They look sort of silly, but they help prevent carpal tunnel and lateral/medial epicondylitis. Ironmind sells these rubber bands for that purpose.

For me, I just go the cheap way and get a bunch of office rubber bands around my fingers, opening them all against them. This is one of those short exercises people can do during lunch break that do make a difference.

[photo]21509[/photo]

The other thing I’ve found that affect arm health is wrist flexibility (both lateral and medial.) People tend to prefer the ez bar for curls because they experience pain when doing barbell curls.

The problem with this is that it simply reinforces an inflexibility (and potential inflammation and decrease in ROM.) Eventually that affects not only barbell-type curling but dumbbell curling and things like chin ups, pull ups and pull downs.

A bicep exercise is not dangerous. It is inflexibility at the wrist and a weak forearm compared to the bicep that really make things painful.

[quote]elnyka wrote:
schultzie wrote:
if you get forearm pain from curls you need to get the forearms stronger with revese curls, grip work, and levering.

^^^^ This.

I would also add finger extensor exercises. They look sort of silly, but they help prevent carpal tunnel and lateral/medial epicondylitis. Ironmind sells these rubber bands for that purpose.

For me, I just go the cheap way and get a bunch of office rubber bands around my fingers, opening them all against them. This is one of those short exercises people can do during lunch break that do make a difference.

[photo]21509[/photo]

The other thing I’ve found that affect arm health is wrist flexibility (both lateral and medial.) People tend to prefer the ez bar for curls because they experience pain when doing barbell curls.

The problem with this is that it simply reinforces an inflexibility (and potential inflammation and decrease in ROM.) Eventually that affects not only barbell-type curling but dumbbell curling and things like chin ups, pull ups and pull downs.

A bicep exercise is not dangerous. It is inflexibility at the wrist and a weak forearm compared to the bicep that really make things painful.[/quote]

Good tips, I’m going to go buy me some rubber bands.

[quote]MEYMZ wrote:
mr popular wrote:
Ronsauce wrote:
I can honestly say with 100% certainty that I’ve never considered the safety of a biceps exercise.

I would echo what Ron is saying here.

X3, this would be my last concern, you have to really fuckup to make a bicep exercise not safe.[/quote]

x4

If you’re trying to ‘bounce’ dumbells that you obviously can’t lift with good form, then I would agree that doing them on an incline bench wouldn’t be the smartest thing for shoulder health. However, I always loved the exercise myself, and will openly admit that I don’t use as much weight now as I did when I first put on a decent amount of arm size, simply because my body has taken quite a beating over the last 16 years, and I do consider safety when I train. BUT I still do them simply because I feel the benefits outweigh the risks. I think your chances of hurting yourself swinging a heavy barbell are a lot higher than incline db curls any day.

If you want a ‘change’ for your workout, just switch the order of your two exercises that you’re currently doing for bis, and watch as your weight on BB curls goes down, but your arm measurements go up.

S

[quote]DOHCrazy wrote:
MEYMZ wrote:
mr popular wrote:
Ronsauce wrote:
I can honestly say with 100% certainty that I’ve never considered the safety of a biceps exercise.

I would echo what Ron is saying here.

X3, this would be my last concern, you have to really fuckup to make a bicep exercise not safe.

x4

[/quote]

Then all of you multiplication experts probably haven’t curled in excess of 85lbs with one hand for reps.

I agree, for most people they have little to worry about, but most of that is simply because the weights used aren’t that significant to tear a tendon unless they are unusually sloppy. However, if you are someone who is curling the weights that often have dust on them, it pays to not keep pushing if intense pain pops up. More care during the movement is also needed.

The last thing we need is for someone to start acting like biceps are somehow immune to injury.

[quote]Ronsauce wrote:
I can honestly say with 100% certainty that I’ve never considered the safety of a biceps exercise.[/quote]

Well according to a cunt on another forum:

FYI DB incline curls, assuming these are done seated on a bench? if so, these are probs THE worst bicep movement for your shoulders

the technical bit;

“The proximal tendon of the long head of the biceps is one of the most commonly injured structures of the shoulder joint. It’s highly susceptible to overuse and even rupture if the degeneration is allowed to proceed. Given the long head of the biceps’ interaction with the highly important glenoid labrum, you want to be very careful to avoid irritating this tendon. When you take your elbow and shoulder into full extension simultaneously, you lengthen the long head of the biceps. Now, put yourself in the incline curl position, and you turn that shoulder extension into hyperextension. Tendons with a history of trauma don’t typically like to be taken to extremes, especially under load.”

So, I made a thread earlier on asking if he was bullshitting me to which loads of people came on and basically sucked his cock in agreement. Just sayin’

[quote]Hazza1989 wrote:
Ronsauce wrote:
I can honestly say with 100% certainty that I’ve never considered the safety of a biceps exercise.

Well according to a cunt on another forum:

FYI DB incline curls, assuming these are done seated on a bench? if so, these are probs THE worst bicep movement for your shoulders

the technical bit;

“The proximal tendon of the long head of the biceps is one of the most commonly injured structures of the shoulder joint. It’s highly susceptible to overuse and even rupture if the degeneration is allowed to proceed. Given the long head of the biceps’ interaction with the highly important glenoid labrum, you want to be very careful to avoid irritating this tendon. When you take your elbow and shoulder into full extension simultaneously, you lengthen the long head of the biceps. Now, put yourself in the incline curl position, and you turn that shoulder extension into hyperextension. Tendons with a history of trauma don’t typically like to be taken to extremes, especially under load.”

So, I made a thread earlier on asking if he was bullshitting me to which loads of people came on and basically sucked his cock in agreement. Just sayin’[/quote]

You’re a newb who comes across like a know it all. That combination sucks.

I stay away from upright rows because I see more benefit from other movements and because of the risk of shoulder damage. That doesn’t mean no human alive can do them without injury. There are clearly people who use them without any problems. That doesn’t erase the RISK.

The stance you are taking is as if there are black and white “all good or all bad” answers to everything involving weight lifting. There are not.

[quote]Professor X wrote:Then all of you multiplication experts probably haven’t curled in excess of 85lbs with one hand for reps.

I agree, for most people they have little to worry about, but most of that is simply because the weights used aren’t that significant to tear a tendon unless they are unusually sloppy.

The last thing we need is for someone to start acting like biceps are somehow immune to injury.[/quote]

Obviously it’d be shortsighted to think that a body part could be immune to injury.

I have a feeling the OP really shouldn’t be too concerned with what biceps exercises might be safe or unsafe though given where he might be in his training. He should just try out different movements for himself and eschew any exercises that cause pain or don’t feel quite right.