T Nation

S.LA.P TEAR


#1

hey guys,I was wondering if anyone has/had this? my question is, what happens If I do not have it fixed,right now I can not afford to be out due to surgery(pro fighter) if anyone had it,how long for recovery ?
some info,I had a labral repair same shoulder 10 yrs ago,(2 tacs put in) but this tear is in a different spot


#2

No one ??


#3

I don't think anyone knows what you're talking about. I'm having the same problem with my injury thread.


#4

I had a SLAP tear. It will be six months before you can start working out seriously and one year before you are 100%. It will not get better without surgical intervention. I remember an MMA in the last year or two that had the same thing and it was 12-14 months before he was back in the ring.


#5

Fight, this is maybe the 3rd post you've made regarding your shoulder issue. In previous threads you've also discussed your elbow issue. See your old posts for more in depth recommendations.

Quick answers to your questions: if you don't fix it, it will most likely increase in tear size. I've had athletes do a pure rehab approach and come out great and others end up going under the knife after. It's a toss up. Surgical repair is anywhere from 6-12 months depending on what is done and the degree of damage. The fact that this is the 2nd tear in the same shoulder leads me to assume there is some sort of biomechanical/movement pattern/mobility/stability issue with that shoulder predisposing it to injury. Or some improper training.


#6

Level, as someone who's been assessed with a SLAP tear, I'd like to know if your rehabbed-only-no-knife athletes that came out great took another MRI scan to make sure that the injury indeed has healed up completely?

Thanks.


#7

None of the ones that have had a great response to the "rehabbed-only-no-knife" approach have every gotten another MRI. But I can guarantee that if those athletes took an MRI that the SLAP tear they had their before is still there, and probably did grow slightly in size. BUT, it isn't about the image, it is about the function and symptoms.

If you were to MRI all the the MLB players, I can say with certainty that 90% of them would have some sort of rotator cuff, labral, etc deformity occurring. It is the part of their sport/activity. But as long as the shoulder is stable, functional, and symptom free, there is no need to mess with it.


#8

Level, that's a very interesting answer. Thanks.

LevelHeaded wrote:

None of the ones that have had a great response to the "rehabbed-only-no-knife" approach have every gotten another MRI. But I can guarantee that if those athletes took an MRI that the SLAP tear they had their before is still there, and probably did grow slightly in size. BUT, it isn't about the image, it is about the function and symptoms.

If you were to MRI all the the MLB players, I can say with certainty that 90% of them would have some sort of rotator cuff, labral, etc deformity occurring. It is the part of their sport/activity. But as long as the shoulder is stable, functional, and symptom free, there is no need to mess with it.


#9

so your saying I should not get surgery now It does affect me really at all???
,I can fight no probs with and lift moderate ?? but the tear will get bigger ? get worse ??

LevelHeaded wrote:

If you were to MRI all the the MLB players, I can say with certainty that 90% of them would have some sort of rotator cuff, labral, etc deformity occurring. It is the part of their sport/activity. But as long as the shoulder is stable, functional, and symptom free, there is no need to mess with it.
[/quote]


#10

The tear can increase in size, but if you are not symptomatic and can do everything that is required of you for your sport and the current size isn't too great, I don't think it would benefit you as greatly to get the surgery.

But, due to the facts that this is the 3rd or 4th thread you've made discussing this shoulder issue, that you have had a pervious labral repair, and that you can only lift moderate, you either still need significant rehab or, more than likely, you need surgery.


#11

thank you,Im sure you will differ,but Im not interested in rehab..Im going to fight again in a month or so,(after being out 3 yrs) if it holds Ill go on..when Im done Ill have surgery,thank you for your replys.


#12

hello sir,I was wondering,I believe it was you who talked about Shoulder impingement ????
If so I have a ? since my DR said nothing about it..thanks again..


#13

What's the question?


#14

I think that's a problematic attitude you got there. How long until the 3rd tear? how long until you completely rip your biceps tendon from the shoulder because there's just pieces of cartilage left? Running your body into the ground with wear n tear injuries while paying little attention to pre- and rehab is not going to be beneficial to your fighting career either.

Get your priorities straight. Let your body heal, even if it means working a boring shitjob in the meantime.


#15

well some have stated not jumping right to surgery and talked about impingement,which I never was told or knew about,looking over my MRI reports..its says The cortical irregularity and cystic changes of the humeral head along the rotator cuff insertion may be seen in the setting of chronic impingement....

some talked about having that dealt with instead of surgery,and this DR never said anything about it..any info would be great


#16

very good point,what I meant by not interested is im smarter then most of the rehab folks,and most of it non sense based on my own experience with shoulder surgery already and carpal tunnel both wrists...but I see your point and thank you,my thing is unlike other sports,I cant sit the bench with a hurt big toe and make millions,no fight..no $$
but I do realize I might have to face reality.. thank you again


#17

To be honestly blunt, this is a very arrogant and cocky response. If you knew more than most of the rehab folks, than you wouldn't be having ongoing issues and coming to the internet for help. We are all here to help, but you obviously have made up your mind with what you want to do.

So before I give any advice (even though it will most likely be the same advice I have given in the past), what specifically are you doing right now for your shoulder to improve it? What are you doing that is "smarter then most of the rehab folks"?


#18

In no way was im being cocky,I respect everyone here and trying to help me,but rehab is not a miracle thing from my own trials..so thats what I go by,they gonna have me stretch,this, that..work range of motion stimulation...and for the record the surgeon agreed with me that more then likely It would not help much ,I come from a very small lil city,nothnig hitech here is all I meant,Right now I warm it up and stretch it out before my 2 sessions of training. It was you talking about impingement no ? again sorry to sound cocky,not my intention,its frustrating thats all,thanks again


#19

No one has a SLAP lesion because it's fucking uncommon. I wish I could examine your shoulder though.


#20

So right now, you are only just warming up and stretching out your shoulder before your sessions. What does your normal training program look like?

From what you have described you are not doing any maintenance or activation work for your scapular stabilizers and rotator cuff, nor are you addressing thoracic mobility. And yes, I did bring up impingement in the past. If you wish to continue with your current regiment of just a "warm up and stretch" then go for it. But I would highly suggest looking into a much more appropriate pre-workout routine consisting of thoracic mobility drills, scapular musculature activation, and rotator cuff activation in addition to your "warmup and stretching".

Doing "rehab" does not mean you HAVE to stop your normal training, although with the amount of issues and times that you have come onto this board and asked about a shoulder or wrist issue, some time off would probably do you some good. But none-the-less, I understand you need to fight to make your money. So for you, I would suggest putting the time into rehab/"pre"hab exercises and place the focus of your weight training into performance advancements with injury prevention and correcting some pathologies you have present.