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S&C for MMA - One Recommended Coach/Program

This question came up recently in other thread @jcmcnorton actually it comes up pretty often. So I thought I’d include here my favorite recommendation on the topic.

8 Weeks Out - Joel Jamieson
S&C coach for former UFC flyweight champion Demetrious Johnson

I’ve got the book and used it for my training when I was competing in BJJ. A very good conditioning resource for fighters, contact sport athletes, etc. IMO.

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I’m reading Jamieson’s book Ultimate MMA Conditioning right now and it’s kick ass. One day I’ll do his full course.

Personally, I also really enjoy Phil Daru’s content. He’s trained Joanna Jędrzejczyk, Dustin Poirier and a slew of others. Fairly certain he was nominated “S&C Coach of the Year” by the UFC at least once

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Thanks man, for bringing this up. I’ve read his Ultimate MMA Conditioning and I liked it a lot. I guess I didn’t realize he had another book that included the S part of S&C. I’ll look it up.

I’ve also purchased Daru’s ‘Fight Ready’ program. There’s nothing wrong with it. I just didn’t really enjoy the methods he used in it.

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Fair enough mate, his methods are certainly a bit Westiside-Esque, which I know can be super divisive

Just to be clear since I don’t think I was: 8 Weeks Out is his website. It’s not as active as it used to be, but there’s still some good content post-Ultimate MMA Conditioning.

Also agree with the other recommendations. Jamieson’s work just answered a lot of questions for me when I was doing BJJ at a more competition pace and wanted to make sure I didn’t overdo it with S&C.

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I found his conditioning recommendations to be really great for me. I basically took the template he gave and used Daru’s conditioning workouts to hit whatever particular energy system. My conditioning has better than its ever been thanks to these guys.

What I’m really hunting down is a way to build more power. Strength for me isn’t a problem. I’m about as strong as I can be at welterweight. I’m rather naturally explosive but I’ve never really trained that aspect and in fell like it would give me a greater advantage.

Maybe it’s too much to ask for to be honest. My best bet so far has been a bodybuilding method of training (Mike Istratel) and it’s working great so far as far as recovery goes. I’ve also considered going to 531 as that’s also easier to recover from. That along with the MMA Conditioning may be the ticket. Just adding things like Power Cleans, jumps and throws might do it.

I’m just experimenting at this point

Thanks for the input fellas

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I think I get where you’re coming from.

At its most specific, what kind of power do you want? Striking (i.e., knockout) power? With the hands or the feet (or the elbows or the knees, for that matter)? Or grappling power, better ability to control your opponent with less effort?

I wonder if, depending on the kind of power you want, there might be more of a technical solution than a physiological or neurological one. Improving both of those with resistance training would certainly help. But given the fact that you are naturally explosive, I’m curious about the extent to which you may need to leverage more technical ways to improve “power” in an MMA context …

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I guess specifically it would be takedowns and striking power. Once I’m on the ground I feel like as long as I have gas I can control the situation. My takedowns are pretty good but some extra power to make my opponent fear the shoot when he feels it. As far as striking goes I have plenty of strength behind the punches but they are a little slow. My lower body is naturally explosive, my upper body is naturally strong and grindy

Prowler pushes for speed and band resisted sprints work well. Also timing your shots and setting them up with striking combos or feints.

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