T Nation

?s About Beginning Oly Progression

I’m beginning to incorporate olympic lifting into my training for the first time and I’m looking for some feedback on what I have laid out.

Snatch Progression Day
-Snatch Grip Deadlift
-Hang Snatch
-Overhead Squat

Clean & Jerk Progression Day
-Front Squat
-Deadlift
-Jump Shrug
-Hang Pull

For both days the setup is,

5-7 x 3-10 @ 60-70%

I took these guidelines from CT’s pendulm training for athletes for the speed-strength week, (last week was max effort).

QUESTIONS

The squats and deadlifts aren’t like normal ones, they’re suppose to be quicker and more explosive, yes?

Practicing with an empty or light bar for a few warmup sets since I’m not familar with this type of lifting, good idea?

Any feedback/advice on exercise selection, volume, intensity is encouraged.

Thanks for helping.

Exercise selection is really not very important; different coaches have very different ways of laying out introductory oly programs, and a lot of different kinds of programs work.

What is very, very important is finding a coach who knows how to teach the oly lifts and a club where the lifts are trained competitively; this is how to start out right and make progress consistently. Bad teachnique is hard to unlearn; it is difficult to make progress in strength when you are not training alongside stronger lifters weekly.

http://msbn.tv/usavision/

Go to “Contact Info” and “registered clubs.”

Thanks for the link. Its a nice site but I already knew that Tim Swords is my closest hope of a coach, and that he’s over 100 miles away.
I just noticed I didn’t mention that I’m only doing olympic lifting 1 week a month, I’m not trying to become an olympic lifter, just supplementing my training with it for now.

[quote]Ross Hunt wrote:
Exercise selection is really not very important; different coaches have very different ways of laying out introductory oly programs, and a lot of different kinds of programs work.

What is very, very important is finding a coach who knows how to teach the oly lifts and a club where the lifts are trained competitively; this is how to start out right and make progress consistently. Bad teachnique is hard to unlearn; it is difficult to make progress in strength when you are not training alongside stronger lifters weekly.

http://msbn.tv/usavision/

Go to “Contact Info” and “registered clubs.”[/quote]

on a related note - as a complete (older) novice how reasonable is it to get in contact with a qualified coach who will train you? does it just depend on the club?

I would go learn how to lift from the coach if you have the opportunity, even if it’s only a one-day deal. He might be willing to work with you and let you know what technique errors to avoid as you work on your own–and, more importantly, teach you what good and bad technique feel like.

Mujina—

It’s certainly on a club-by-club basis, but none of the three clubs I’ve been to would turn away anyone who was interested in the sport and was willing to work.

Assuming, of course, that you’re reasonably healthy. American weightlifting is not exactly overflowing with recruits, so most weightlifters are happy to get another face in the gym.