T Nation

Ruptured Bicep?

Up untill 2 or 3 months ago i used to get an extreme pump in my biceps. The pump was so strong i could only do abou 2 exercises for (barbell curls and hammers) because it became too painful if i kept training. Well on one of my workouts my left bicep felt like it kinda moved out of place(its hard explaining what actually happened) and ever since i stopped getting those pumps during my arm workouts… I also noticed my bicep head became shorter and i was not able to supinate my wrist anymore(if i do it hurts after a while).

could i had rupture my bicep a little or what? its getting annoying because cant really flex that bicep hard anymore during my workouts and its noticable shorter…

You could have, most of the time when a bicep goes you can hear it (at least the two I have been present for). Did you have any discoloration in the area, dead blood, bruising?

Find the spot in the crease of your arm, where they draw blood from. Hold you arm out straight push a finger in hard and pull to the inside(toward you chest). What happens when you do that?

This sounds more like an injury at the origin(above the shoulder)of the long-head. I had a complete separation in 2009. There was no pain, brusing, or discoloration; but I did experience the ‘shifting’ sensation described by the OP. It is the primary head involved in supination. Go see a Doctor…if you do have a seperation and would like to have it repaired, time is critical.

I was just thinking lower attachment point because of the wrist supination thing the OP stated. So blue, your saying the upper tendon controls supination? Not doubting you just furthering my education, lol.

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:
This sounds more like an injury at the origin(above the shoulder)of the long-head. I had a complete separation in 2009. There was no pain, brusing, or discoloration; but I did experience the ‘shifting’ sensation described by the OP. It is the primary head involved in supination. Go see a Doctor…if you do have a seperation and would like to have it repaired, time is critical.

[/quote]

do you think this would be expensive to repair? im pretty poor lol.

[quote]TheDon12 wrote:

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:
This sounds more like an injury at the origin(above the shoulder)of the long-head. I had a complete separation in 2009. There was no pain, brusing, or discoloration; but I did experience the ‘shifting’ sensation described by the OP. It is the primary head involved in supination. Go see a Doctor…if you do have a seperation and would like to have it repaired, time is critical.

[/quote]

do you think this would be expensive to repair? im pretty poor lol.[/quote]

The MRI, Doctors, & Surgery Center billed the insurance company a little over $22,000 in all.
Many people choose not to repair a long-head seperation. I believe I read where Louie Simmons left his detached. Many people are able to regain most of there base strength, but coordination will always be an issue. FTR…I was two years to the month before I equalled my pre-injury flat d.bell press and regained the muscle I lost in the chest, delt, and tricep.

Best Of Luck; whatever you decide.

@Don- when you say the bicep looked shorter, do you mean from the elbow or from the shoulder? Proximal ruptures are more common like BlueCollar was describing, but it could have avulsed from either end. Either way good luck.

@Popeye- Its the muscle that controls the action, so if the rupture was proximal or distal the loss of function would be the same. The muscles that supinate the forearm are the biceps brachii, brachioradialis (assists), and the supinator. I doubt the last two have anything to do with this injury but BlueCollar is speaking from experience and the signs/symptoms lead to the biceps brachii.