T Nation

RPS - Background Checks?


#1

On the RPS site under “rules” it says:
“Regardless of conviction and/or date of occurrence, ANY ACT OF VIOLENCE OR ABUSE AGAINST HUMAN OR ANIMAL, will result in 1) recorded lifts removed from the RPS results and records, 2) barred from competing in an RPS competition forthwith, and/or 3) removal from any officiation or representation of the organization. If you have a history of violence but are now rehabilitated, proof of accepting responsibility for your actions (i.e. guilty plea, public acknowledgment and apology) and documentation of successful release from rehabilitation method (i.e. counseling, classes, therapy) will be considered to allow inclusion in competition. RPS meet directors reserve the right to decline entry to an event to anyone, participant, coach or spectator, for any reason.”

So what does this really mean, you can’t compete if you have been convicted of violent crimes?


#2

Without evidence of taking responsibility and rehabilitating yourself - at the discretion of whoever.


#3

It’s interesting because Chuck Vogelpohl has a few RPS records and there are plenty of stories about him. There is an article or interview out there with Jim Wendler where he tells a story of Chuck punching a guy in the head during a max effort squat workout and then making him squat, he passed out under the bar.


#4

Maybe it was “consensual”. ???


#5

@Reed - you know anything about this?


#6

To my understanding it’s not so much about violent stories like Chuck V being intense as hell but, rather about they dont want to be involved or associated with wife beaters, child abusers, and the such. They don’t need your money so they can choose to not associate with people who aren’t “good people.” With that I’m fairly certain there must be legal and binding proof. You can’t just accuse some one and then they say you can’t compete. But if you a convicted of domestic abuse, armed robbery, or assault of a minor bla bla bla they can ban you from meets. I feel it is more used for meet directors and the such but, is applicable to lifters as well.


#7

Makes sense Reed.

Hopefully they don’t adopt the guilty upon accusation standard being used these days to remove scores of men from their positions in sports or media.