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Rows for Chest Maintenance?


#1

recently i hurt my right pec(the outter portion - not sure of name) and cant do chest work. it happened almost two weeks ago and my chest/back day has turned into mainly a rowing day. i know i read somewhere some author hurt his chest and used rows but i forget how well it worked out. if anyone has any thoughts or opinions i'd appreciate the help. thank you.

also, should i continue doing db left pec work and are there any techniques or lifts worth doing to speed recovery?


#2

You are asking if training your back will help your chest to grow?


#3

Rows will not preserve your chest muscle, but I feel they may add more stability to keep your bench from completely plummeting. Keep doing db work with the other arm. I injured my left rotator cuff last year and continued to do one armed db incline and flat bench. As soon as my rotator cuff was better, the muscle came back very fast and my strength did not take a big hit.


#4

Firstly, you should get used to the idea that you will lose some chest, big deal.

I would recommend pull-ups and chin-ups, since I tend to get some outer pec soreness from them.
If that’s still too hard on your pec, try some flat DB presses where you press the two dumbbells together; that’s a good alternative to unsupported internal rotation movements.

You could also up your overhead pressing movements to promote some (albeit rather low) chest involvement.


#5

Real rows, or rather, paddling a canoe can work your chest to some degree, but I don’t understand how doing rows in a gym would help.


#6

Ha! Nothing to add other then HA!


#7

[quote]Professor X wrote:
You are asking if training your back will help your chest to grow?[/quote]

Training all kinds of random body parts make your arms go apparently, so this isn’t that much of a stretch is it mate?


#8

[quote]stevo_ wrote:
Professor X wrote:
You are asking if training your back will help your chest to grow?

Training all kinds of random body parts make your arms go apparently, so this isn’t that much of a stretch is it mate?[/quote]

Would doing calf raises help my traps?


#9

[quote]RSGZ wrote:
stevo_ wrote:
Professor X wrote:
You are asking if training your back will help your chest to grow?

Training all kinds of random body parts make your arms go apparently, so this isn’t that much of a stretch is it mate?

Would doing calf raises help my traps?[/quote]

Yes it would, just like wrist curls work my glutes…


#10

[quote]Fuzzyapple wrote:
RSGZ wrote:
stevo_ wrote:
Professor X wrote:
You are asking if training your back will help your chest to grow?

Training all kinds of random body parts make your arms go apparently, so this isn’t that much of a stretch is it mate?

Would doing calf raises help my traps?

Yes it would, just like wrist curls work my glutes…[/quote]

Dude, you better work on that. You may have an impingement or whatever. Everyone knows wrist curls are for your Hamstrings.


#11

[quote]Dre the Hatchet wrote:
Firstly, you should get used to the idea that you will lose some chest, big deal.

I would recommend pull-ups and chin-ups, since I tend to get some outer pec soreness from them.
If that’s still too hard on your pec, try some flat DB presses where you press the two dumbbells together; that’s a good alternative to unsupported internal rotation movements.

You could also up your overhead pressing movements to promote some (albeit rather low) chest involvement.[/quote]

Are you like, pushing yourself back down in your eccentric or something? Maybe you’re confusing a stretch at the top with chest soreness?


#12

I hurt my shoulders to the point I could not do any pressing movements multiple times. However, most rowing movements did not hurt so I sometimes did back workouts as many as three times per week. Also, as you suggested, you could always continue to train your non-injured side with dumbbell and machines/cables.

For recovery, I READ (on Elitefts/Westside) that they do mini band exercises (lots of reps) sometimes on the injured/strained area just to force a lot of blood into the area. However, I have not tried this myself and you should look into it further if so inclined.


#13

Studies show that when you train a muscle on one side of your body, the corresponding muscle on the other side actually responds as if it’s being trained, too. Couldn’t this apply here?


#14

[quote]btbnashua wrote:
Studies show that when you train a muscle on one side of your body, the corresponding muscle on the other side actually responds as if it’s being trained, too. Couldn’t this apply here?[/quote]

It doesn’t respond just like it has been trained. Those studies showed a DECREASE IN ATROPHY of you kept working unilaterally. It shows how effective neural patterns are to affecting growth of muscle tissue…and proves once again that anyone who states they know exactly how muscle is stimulated to grow in all cases is either lying, trying to sell you something or both.

Yes, it can apply here if only one side of his chest is injured. Working the opposing muscle group has nothing to do with those studies.


#15

[quote]btbnashua wrote:
Studies show that when you train a muscle on one side of your body, the corresponding muscle on the other side actually responds as if it’s being trained, too. Couldn’t this apply here?[/quote]

No. The neural spillover effect of contralateral training doesn’t work for reciprocal muscle groups.

Row movements “may” involve some use of the sternal portion of the pectoralis major muscle, but nothing substantial for strength maintenance.


#16

[quote]Professor X wrote:
You are asking if training your back will help your chest to grow?[/quote]

not at all. im asking if training my back, primarily antagonists to the chest, will do anything to maintain chest strength while i’m unable to direct chest work


#17

Oh yes, and just to add about the contralateral training effect if just doing the other side of the chest is being considered, it probably won’t work for an advanced trainer. Only been shown in novices/sedentary individuals.


#18

interesting thread


#19

What about push-ups? They may be a low impact way to maintain muscle while you recover.


#20

[quote]thephantom wrote:
What about push-ups? They may be a low impact way to maintain muscle while you recover. [/quote]

even while doing them on my knees, they felt too uncomfortable to continue