Rowing Intervals Anyone?

I wanted to include these in my training.

Anyone do these? And if so, how are they programmed? I just figured with the amount of pulling work (back,biceps) do you modify your training for these body parts for recovery purposes?

For goals, I’m looking to strip away 10 lbs. of fat while preserving every ounce of muscle.

I change up my conditioning work every few weeks but when I was last rowing…

Concept 2 rower on max settting - 1000m warm up - 200m sprints (as fast as possible) - 30 seconds rest and repeat 5-7 times

I’ve been following 5/3/1 since xmas so would do this kind of conditioning on deadlift and squat days - or as active recovery on a rest day

[quote]Brett620 wrote:
I wanted to include these in my training.

Anyone do these? And if so, how are they programmed? I just figured with the amount of pulling work (back,biceps) do you modify your training for these body parts for recovery purposes?

For goals, I’m looking to strip away 10 lbs. of fat while preserving every ounce of muscle.[/quote]

Last august in 9 weeks i trimmed 9 pounds on a recumbant bike. I choose it over a rower because it is real silent and i get up real early(plus the price is lower).
My intensity slowly progressed over the weeks but volume was a factor(it also increased over the weeks).
My approached was to take it easy keep my joints, etc… ok so over time i would reach my goal wich i did.
I did not loose but i would not oversweat that factor. With muscle memory a small loss will come back soon. Basically my nutrition did not changed and my training did not changed much. I was modulating a bit more volume, a bit more intense.
All the best !

Never put the rower on its max setting.

As far as workouts are concerned, try tabata intervals, 8-12 200 meter pieces and 20-30 minute steady state rows.

what Kbaktidy said, with this exception. Make sure you do your TABATA intervals FIRST. Then get into the 20-30 minute steady.

Always always do your sprints before your steady state workouts…

I spent the first six months of 1996 with the US Olympic Sculling Team (silver in the olympics) as their Massage and Stretch Therapist.

The team was comprised of Coach Igor Grinko, Brian Jamieson, Erik Mueller, Jason Gailles and Tim Young.

Learned by doing it…

Sorry if i wasn’t clear enough. Thanks for clarifying killerDirk

Just to add I little more info when I was training for nationals last year I did tabata intervals about once a week. Usually after I never had enough energy to more than some light abb exercises and some mobility drills. If you can row another 20-30 minutes after go for it, but don’t be disappointed if you can’t.

To answer you question about recovery. I wouldn’t worry about bicep recovery. I usually avoid hard back/quad workouts the day after, but depending on how you feel you can train whatever you want the day after. Personally I prefer to do all my rowing the day before chest.

Rowing is mostly leg drive. Like Kbaktidy said avoid hard back and quad sessions when rowing for recovery purposes.

Rowing intervals are great for conditioning though, but have a look at a rower’s instructional video on how to row properly on a Concept 2 as many people open their back too early and rip it with the arms. You want to have separation to the stroke and start by engaging the leg drive before opening the back.

These all work…

In particular pushing it on the 2k can gas you like practically nothing else.

Competitive Rowers are Known for Puking more than any other athletes on the Planet.

So yeah, must be something to it when you leave your inners in the water ; )

[quote]Kbaktidy wrote:
Never put the rower on its max setting.

As far as workouts are concerned, try tabata intervals, 8-12 200 meter pieces and 20-30 minute steady state rows. [/quote]

I’m glad you said this. By “max setting” do you mean 10 or 1? And why not put it on max? Not trying to be smart. I really don’t know.

By max setting I meant 10. Most people row between 4 and 6. As for reason why, I am not entirely sure, its just what every coach I’ve ever met has told me. What I’ve noticed is that when I keep the setting higher than around a 6 my lower back ends up much more sore the next day and I have more trouble developing power when rowing for more than a minute continuously.

My friend trains on the uni rowing team. He says to put it on setting 7 since it simulates conditions on water best, so from a sport specific point of view that’s one reason.
I get similar times whether I put it on 7 or 10 (1:35 500m pace), but I feel more gassed when it’s on 7, and feel like the higher setting makes my arms ache more. So my broscience assumption is that the higher setting relies on your arms more, and the lower settings use more legs.

But yes, I like rowing intervals. If it comes to the end of a workout and I’m out of time/bored, a 500m/1000m test, or a 500m ladder is a great way to make myself feel like I’m moderately athletic

[quote]youngoldguy wrote:

[quote]Kbaktidy wrote:
Never put the rower on its max setting.

As far as workouts are concerned, try tabata intervals, 8-12 200 meter pieces and 20-30 minute steady state rows. [/quote]

I’m glad you said this. By “max setting” do you mean 10 or 1? And why not put it on max? Not trying to be smart. I really don’t know.[/quote]

Among other things, over time it will really piss off your back

[quote]Kbaktidy wrote:
By max setting I meant 10. Most people row between 4 and 6. As for reason why, I am not entirely sure, its just what every coach I’ve ever met has told me. What I’ve noticed is that when I keep the setting higher than around a 6 my lower back ends up much more sore the next day and I have more trouble developing power when rowing for more than a minute continuously. [/quote]

Weird. On 10 I feel like I use a lot more leg drive than on any lower setting. I guess I like 10 because the flywheel slows down less between strokes (lol) than on the lower settings.

As others mentioned, too high a setting can encourage opening the back up to early and putting unnecessary pressure on the spine to pull on the higher resistance. Also it generally becomes less efficient as well in terms of the splits you pull.

It is also worth checking the drag factor on options before you start as due to the varying quality of maintenance of different ergs, the setting is slightly different. I have always aimed for a drag factor of 130-135 as recommended by my rowing coach which is usually 5-6 on well kept ergs, but can be 7 on older machines or ones that haven’t been cleaned properly.

 Rowing is one of my favorite conditioning tools because it is very low impact, it does not take as much of a toll on your body as running would, and if done right it is more brutal than running could ever be (at least for me). I would not worry about the about the recovery of your back and biceps. If your technique if correct rowing power comes mainly from the legs and hips. The back and arms are just to finish the pull.

Some of my favorite workouts are:

  1. 30 seconds all out/30 seconds rest for 15 intervals. Be sure to go all out each interval and keep track of your total meters or calories after you are done. You can uses this to track your progress as it provides a goal to try and beat each time. I usually do this every other week at the most.

  2. 10x250 meters with 30 seconds rest. This is really brutal and is a mind game more than anything.

  3. 3x1000 meters with 3 minutes rest. Again this is a mind game due to the thought of having to repeat the 1000 meter row 3 times.

 I could go on and on with different workouts, but there are so many out there. The C2 site is a good resource for workout. My main suggestion is to pick something that is repeatable and track you times, so that in the future you can retest yourself.

The reason you get more gassed from the lower setting is because the flywheel doesnt slow down as much. So, the exercise becomes more like running down a hill, you have to keep up. The speed of movement has to be sharper and the ‘catch’ where you start feeling weight on the handle is more slippery. When you have the setting on 10, its more like doing a set of weights, a very defined catch and you can really get hold of it and grind out the stroke.

I rowed for years and since then my favorite is doing X time starting with 30 sec on/ 30 off. then progressing to 40 on 20 off and so on. Its a nice way to keep challenging yourself and the intervals make it more interesting than 20-60 minute grinding ergos

The # 7 setting seems to be correct all the way around, almost reguardless of the training.
Interesting side note, Deena Kastor of American Marathon fame had this to say:
“Running uphill makes you Strong, running downhill makes you Fast.”
How this applies to the Concept 2 ? If you use more resistance you will be getting Strong(er), while using lower resistance will allow you to produce more speed. Does this sound a bit like Westside? A heavy day along with and explosive day… funny how it is all interconnected, huh ?

One other way to increase the amount of force used by the legs is to Elevate the back end of the machine off the ground.
I have done this with my GHR to provide more time under tension for my glutes/hams.

Good luck and continued success !

It appears there are some very knowledgeable people here about rowing. I want to work it into my training, but, everytime I get serious, I have lower back pain. Obviously my form is wrong, and, yes, I have been using the 10 setting. I would appreciate someone posting a video of the correct form. I have watched some on You Tube, however, I am ignorant on the subject of rowing and dont even know if what I was watching was correct. Thanks.