T Nation

Rotator Cuff Training


#1

Hey guys just tried some external rotation could only use 7 pounds for 9 reps. Just wondering if any of you had any ideas on how often to train rotator cuff, and how many sets to do.


#2

There are a few good activation exercises that a lot of people do. My fav routine for prehab in boxing. keeps the shoulder strong.


#3

[quote]aliceinchains wrote:
Hey guys just tried some external rotation could only use 7 pounds for 9 reps. Just wondering if any of you had any ideas on how often to train rotator cuff, and how many sets to do.[/quote]

Train it every training session (or every day if you have no previous injuries). I use very high rep work (in the 15-30 rep range) and do 2 sets per exercise.


#4

I tore my labrum a little while back and i was limited to rehabbing 3 days a week. internal and external rotations were a big help. Also try setting up with some light dumbbells in a flat press position but hold them up at the top. instead of doing a normal press keep your arms straight and just push your shoulders forward to move the weights higher.


#5

[quote]TheWeaponX wrote:
I tore my labrum a little while back and i was limited to rehabbing 3 days a week. internal and external rotations were a big help. Also try setting up with some light dumbbells in a flat press position but hold them up at the top. instead of doing a normal press keep your arms straight and just push your shoulders forward to move the weights higher.[/quote]

This is a good exercise, but if you do it wrong, it does absolutely nothing.


#6

why are you training them specifically?
Unless you are doing rehab, or having a glaring weakness in another lift there’s no point.


#7

[quote]Airtruth wrote:
why are you training them specifically?
Unless you are doing rehab, or having a glaring weakness in another lift there’s no point.[/quote]

Everyone could use more rotator cuff work.


#8

[quote]nkklllll wrote:

[quote]Airtruth wrote:
why are you training them specifically?
Unless you are doing rehab, or having a glaring weakness in another lift there’s no point.[/quote]

Everyone could use more rotator cuff work.[/quote]

Not true.

And I do rotator cuff work, before and after my torn labrum and rotator cuff surgery. Before, I needed to in order to keep my shoulder from popping out and EVERYTHING. With the shape of my glenhumerol joint and torn labrum I could not keep it from popping out in certain situations but I can reduce the number of times. Did it after the surgery to keep the muscle from healing incorrectly.

If you are healthy with a balanced weightlifting program your rotator cuff will have the appropriate strength and endurance for your shoulders that you need. Building it up unnecessarily can lead to impingement and or stabilizing issues. The only other reason I can see to specifically work it, is for Arm Wrestling. Other than that you are wasting valuable gym time.

For the record my internal rotation strength went up drastically when my bench and Flys went up, and my external rotation went up when I did single arm pulling exercises with slight twists. I only had to do them specifically because I could not do those exercises.


#9

[quote]nkklllll wrote:

[quote]Airtruth wrote:
why are you training them specifically?
Unless you are doing rehab, or having a glaring weakness in another lift there’s no point.[/quote]

Everyone could use more rotator cuff work.[/quote]
This.


#10

I read an article on this site stating that your external rotation weight should be 10% of your close grip bench press. My close grip bench press for reps is 250lbs, so I should be using at least 25lbs on external rotations. I assume this is the reason for my left shoulder hurting after lifting.

Thanks for all the ideas.


#11

[quote]Airtruth wrote:

[quote]nkklllll wrote:

[quote]Airtruth wrote:
why are you training them specifically?
Unless you are doing rehab, or having a glaring weakness in another lift there’s no point.[/quote]

Everyone could use more rotator cuff work.[/quote]

Not true.

And I do rotator cuff work, before and after my torn labrum and rotator cuff surgery. Before, I needed to in order to keep my shoulder from popping out and EVERYTHING. With the shape of my glenhumerol joint and torn labrum I could not keep it from popping out in certain situations but I can reduce the number of times. Did it after the surgery to keep the muscle from healing incorrectly.

If you are healthy with a balanced weightlifting program your rotator cuff will have the appropriate strength and endurance for your shoulders that you need. Building it up unnecessarily can lead to impingement and or stabilizing issues. The only other reason I can see to specifically work it, is for Arm Wrestling. Other than that you are wasting valuable gym time.

For the record my internal rotation strength went up drastically when my bench and Flys went up, and my external rotation went up when I did single arm pulling exercises with slight twists. I only had to do them specifically because I could not do those exercises.[/quote]

I don’t see how training it can cause stabilization issues. They’re stabilizers. If you’ve never done any rotator cuff work, chances are you need to do some rotator cuff work.


#12

[quote]aliceinchains wrote:
I read an article on this site stating that your external rotation weight should be 10% of your close grip bench press. My close grip bench press for reps is 250lbs, so I should be using at least 25lbs on external rotations. I assume this is the reason for my left shoulder hurting after lifting.

Thanks for all the ideas.[/quote]

Sounds like range is more your problem then weight. Keep the weight light, increase the reps. Focus on your posture and the ROM in the exercises in BpBob’s video. At the very least pull your shoulder back and down throughout the day, sometimes quick, sometimes hold. Replace one of your bench days with back day until your shoulder is better.

What are your rows, pull-ups and shrugs like?