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Rotator Cuff Being Strengthened?

Hey guys,
I have always been a little confused about this. Will hypertrophy and strength of the deltoids increase the resistence to injury of the rotator cuff? I am under the impression that joints cannot really be strengthed although one can be healthy or it can be unhealthy.

Do exercises such as external and internal rotations actually strengthen the rotator cuff (the joint) or are they aimed at strengthening the delts? Thanks
-Matt

[quote]Matgic wrote:
Hey guys,
I have always been a little confused about this. Will hypertrophy and strength of the deltoids increase the resistence to injury of the rotator cuff? I am under the impression that joints cannot really be strengthed although one can be healthy or it can be unhealthy.

Do exercises such as external and internal rotations actually strengthen the rotator cuff (the joint) or are they aimed at strengthening the delts? Thanks
-Matt[/quote]

First off, I think you are getting confused. The Rotator Cuff is not a joint. The “shoulder joint” is called the glenohumeral joint. The Rotator Cuff is a group of 4 small muscles (supraspinatus, infaspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis) that help stablize the joint and work motions with the shoulder girdle, specifically internal and external rotation.

By keeping those muscles strong (with external and internal rotiation exercises) and flexible, you can help keep them from injury. For flexibility issues, try doing a search for the “neanderthal no more” article.

To be clear, the rotator cuff is a collection of muscles and tendons that hold the arm ball in the shoulder socket and provide support. It is not the ball and socket arrangement; it is not bone.

More strictly, the cuff consists of just four supporting tendons, but to build a rotator cuff refers to strengthening the muscles underneath the deltoids responsible for internal and external rotation.

[quote]Matgic wrote:
Will hypertrophy and strength of the deltoids increase the resistence to injury of the rotator cuff?[/quote]

Not in and of itself, but certain delt movements stress rotation more than others. Side raises, not at all. Dumbbell pressing, a bit more.

Certainly you can strengthen the muscles that hold the joint in place, and subsequently their resistance to shock. That’s one component of joint health.

As above, they’ll strengthen the muscles and tendons that compose the cuff. But the cuff is only part of the joint.

Really, we’re digging too deep here. Cable rotations take very little time to do. Add them to you chest days. Focus more on the external movement.

DI