T Nation

Rolfing

Does anyone know of a good Rolfer in the Long Island or NYC area who is experienced and will not charge an arm and a leg for their services?

Please “private message” me if you do.

Thanks

Bump bump…anyone know?

I live on long island… but what the hell is a rolfer?

It involves two guys, some plumbing equipment, and a very open mind.

Ok, I’m kidding. I have no idea what the hell he’s talking about.

[quote]Squeak wrote:
It involves two guys, some plumbing equipment, and a very open mind.

Ok, I’m kidding. I have no idea what the hell he’s talking about.[/quote]

some bullshit new age massage therapy becoming popular with the same crowd that thinks that herbs can cure aids

it claims to realign the body from the natural stresses caused by gravity, because ya know, i wake up everymorning just thinking about how much gravity is kicking my ass that day

my ex-gf insisted I go to some rolfing sessions, she even paid for all five, i went thru five from supposedly one of the best rolfers on the east coast, and felt no different

the only thing rolfing is going to realign is your wallet

you are much better off getting ART therapy for whatever is bothering you

[quote]hoosierdaddy wrote:
Squeak wrote:
It involves two guys, some plumbing equipment, and a very open mind.

Ok, I’m kidding. I have no idea what the hell he’s talking about.

some bullshit new age massage therapy becoming popular with the same crowd that thinks that herbs can cure aids

it claims to realign the body from the natural stresses caused by gravity, because ya know, i wake up everymorning just thinking about how much gravity is kicking my ass that day

my ex-gf insisted I go to some rolfing sessions, she even paid for all five, i went thru five from supposedly one of the best rolfers on the east coast, and felt no different

the only thing rolfing is going to realign is your wallet

you are much better off getting ART therapy for whatever is bothering you

[/quote]

lol, I guess that pretty much sums up rolfing doesn’t it.

[quote]Squeak wrote:
It involves two guys, some plumbing equipment, and a very open mind.

Ok, I’m kidding. I have no idea what the hell he’s talking about.[/quote]

I thought it was puking, just goes to show you learn something new everyday.

[quote]911 Girl wrote:
Squeak wrote:
It involves two guys, some plumbing equipment, and a very open mind.

Ok, I’m kidding. I have no idea what the hell he’s talking about.

I thought it was puking, just goes to show you learn something new everyday.[/quote]

911 girl, you and me both!

I heard there is more to it than that. It involves breaking the fascia, etc. What didn’t you like about it. I heard from several people that Rolfing is effective… why were you having it done?

Sounds pretty lame to me.

Did it hurt? I heard ART is pretty painful. Then again most rehab is fairly painful (hot/cold baths… I think I almost cried).

Isn’t ralphing another term for puking? Sounds almost all the same to me.

Keep your minds open.

Rolfing frees fascia adhesions (unhealthy binding of tissues), allowing the muscles and bones to return to balanced relationships.

Need some proof that it works:

RESEARCH ON ROLFING
Structural Integration, Dr. Ida Rolf, Rockefeller Institute, N.Y., 1918 - 1927

Project Breakthrough, Foundation For Brain Injured Children, N.Y.C. 1963

Stress, Stimulus Intensity Control, and the Structural Integration Technique, Silverman, Rappaport & Hopkins, (abstract : Confinia Psychiatrica, Karger Publisher, Switzerland, 1973)

Effects of Structural Integration On Strait-Trait Anxiety, Robert Wagner and Valerie Hunt, UCLA, 1976, (abstract : Journal of Clinical Psychology, Vol. 35, No.2, USA, April 1979)

A Study of Structural Integration from Neuromuscular, Energy Field & Emotional Approaches, (abstract: Dr. Valerie Hunt and Wayne Massey, UCLA Dept. of Kinesiology, 1977)

Electromyographic Evaluation of Structural Integration Techniques, Dr. Valerie Hunt and Wayne Massey, UCLA, (abstract : Psychoenergetic Systems, Gordon & Breach Science Pub., U.K., 1977)

Functional Evaluation of Rolfing in Cerebral Palsy, Perry, Jones & Thomas, (abstract : Developmental Med. Child. Neurol. 1981, 23)
Children With Cerebral Palsy, Cindy Potter, 1986

Effects Of Soft Tissue Mobilization on Parasympathetic Tone in Two Age Groups, J. Cottingham, Frances Nelson Health Center, Illinois, 1987, (abstract : The Journal of American Physical Therapy Assn., Vol. 68, 352-356, 1988)

Shifts in Pelvic Inclination Angle and Parasympathetic Tone Produced by Rolfing Soft Tissue Manipulation, J. Cottingham, Frances Nelson Health Center, Illinois, (abstract : The Journal of American Physical Therapy Assn., Vol. 68, 1364-1370, 1988)
Biomechanical Structuring For Figure Skating, preliminary pilot study report for the U.S. Figure Skating Association, Helen James, Katharine Robertson, and Neal Powers, Olympic Training Center Camp, CO, 1988

Effects of Soft Tissue Mobilization On Pelvic Inclination Angle, Lumbar lordisis, and Parasympathetic Tone: Implications for Treatment of Disabilities Associated with Lumbar Degenerative Joint Disease, Cottingham JT. Public testimony presentation to the National Center of Medical Rehabilitation Research of the National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD; March 19,1992. Rolf Lines 20 (2) : 42-45, 1992

A Three-Paradigm Treatment Model Using Soft Tissue Mobilization and Guided Movement-Awareness Techniques For Patients With Chronic Back Pain: A Case Study, J. Cottingham and J. Maitland, The Journal of Orthopedic & Sports Physical Therapy, Vol.26, No.3, Sept.1997
Integrating Manual and Movement Therapy With Philosophical Counseling For Treatment of A Patient With Amyptrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Case Study That Explores The Principles Of Holistic Intervention J. Cottingham, M.S., P.T. and J. Maitland, Ph.D., Alternative Therapies In Health and Medicine, Winter/Spring 2000

Rolfing is effective, just as ART is. There actually very similar modalities.

Rolfing has been shown to have profound effects in the reduction of the spinal curvature of people with lordosis (sway back).

In one study it even significantly enhanced neurological functioning. My fellow powerlifters take heed in the fact that it might enhance your CNS, maybe by manipulating your muscles length-tension relationship, allowing your muscles to activate from an advantageous position (better posture). It may even reduce your muscles tonus level.

My point is just because one boneheaded fool had a bad experience don?t dismiss this valuable tool. Put it in your tool box.

[quote]BOSS wrote:
MORONS
Keep your minds open.
[/quote]

Now, at first I wasn’t going to believe anything about Rolfing, as I thought it was “rolling on the floor laughing,” but . . .

You convinced me. Seriously. I truly understand how much I’ve to learn.

Share with me your secrets, baws.

Nice copy and paste from www.rolf.org Please. Now I havn’t read any of those studies, nor do I have a desire to… But they all probably pertain to deep tissue massage and other randoms sorts of treatment. Not just rolfing. (Excluding the studies with rolfing in the title.)

Secondly here’s a great quote “Because Rolfing is a holistic technique, it is recognized that changes in structure will impact the whole person, physically, emotionally, and energetically.” From the saem website.

And again… More faggotry… “Rolfing is as concerned with how people experience and use their bodies as with their structural organization in gravity.” This is in About Rolfing - Theory and Princeples.

What is the difference between rolfing and massges? Read an entirely crap answer that could win “Deceptive Marketing Blurb of the Year” award
http://www.rolf.org/about/faq/q8.html

read some more interesting stuff here. It seems that Rolfing isn’t really based on science. But just in that it works. Sure…
http://skepdic.com/rolfing.html

Seems like the only thing Rolfing is gonna do for sure is lighen your wallet.

BTW BOSS I like the nice name calling to start out your post. Instead of defending your subject succintly, you resort to petty name calling. Quite mature.

I went to a rolfer for my shoulders for a while, and I can definitely say it helped me. They do things in a series of blocks with a focus on your whole body and that is my gripe about the process. My meaning is - I didn’t want to spend more money on something that may or may have not needed it, like my ankles or forearms. In the end I would find someone who does A.R.T. - I found it to be much more effective for my dime

Peace

I saw a news story that most of the Minnesota Vikings go to a local rolfer, and it sounds like they have for a while from listening to the local sports radio station. So, either the rolfer is great at pushing his new-age crap, or those Vikings have decided rolfing is the best treatment they’ve found. At this point, it’s a toss up. I hate it when people come up for stupid reasons for why treatments work, than just admit that they have a limited knowledge of how something works despite solid results.

[quote]Garrett W. wrote:
Sounds pretty lame to me.

Did it hurt? I heard ART is pretty painful. Then again most rehab is fairly painful (hot/cold baths… I think I almost cried).

Isn’t ralphing another term for puking? Sounds almost all the same to me.[/quote]

And your post is more mature. LOL

[quote]Garrett W. wrote:
BTW BOSS I like the nice name calling to start out your post. Instead of defending your subject succintly, you resort to petty name calling. Quite mature.[/quote]

I did not start my post with an insult, Where!!!

isn’t it to do with some australian guy…rolf harris?:slight_smile:

" and shes buying a stairway to heaven…"

actually, i will add to this further.

Go see a GOOD physiotherapist. If the know release techniques, and the should, they will be able to treat you fairly holistically.

A sports orientated one is important. others cant give the degree of pressure on triggerpoints or progression of exercise (IF YOU NEED IT).

get a recomendation, maybe off an athlete or local med/high level team in your area.

They should also be chartered in some way, so you can be more assured that they have credability and aren’t some quack