T Nation

Rogue SB-1 vs EliteFTS SS Yoke Bar

Wondering if anyone has used both of these bars specifically? I’ve used the one from Elite and liked it with the exception of the handles (it’s the only one I’ve used so they may all be that way?). I’ve been wanting to get an SSB for awhile and am just trying to finalize my decision. Google search shows some reviews, but couldn’t find any actual comparisons.

Also, I’m sure it’s elsewhere on the forum, but if you’re chiming in anyway then I’d like to hear how it has transferred over to your low bar squat.

I have a Yoke Bar. The Rogue bar looks of lesser quality at least on the pad area.

I love my Yoke Bar. It kicks my ass. Havn’t really done of bunch of Barbell Squats since I got it though.

Ssb lights up my back. I think it’d be better for my deadlift honestly.

[quote]budreiser wrote:
Ssb lights up my back. I think it’d be better for my deadlift honestly.[/quote]

Yeah, I’m hoping it will serve two purposes. I want to start squatting more frequently, but my knee bothers me when I do low bar too often. The SSB doesn’t bother my knee as much so I figure I can add that in for more frequency, which will hopefully carry over to both my squat and deadlift.

how does the yoke bar feel on your knees compared to a front squat? I’ve only used one for good mornings so far

I’ll be ordering mine from Black Widow most likely in a couple months

[quote]jlburch wrote:

[quote]budreiser wrote:
Ssb lights up my back. I think it’d be better for my deadlift honestly.[/quote]

Yeah, I’m hoping it will serve two purposes. I want to start squatting more frequently, but my knee bothers me when I do low bar too often. The SSB doesn’t bother my knee as much so I figure I can add that in for more frequency, which will hopefully carry over to both my squat and deadlift.[/quote]

I apologize that I can’t help directly with the question, as I have a new york barbells SSB (which I still love very much), but in terms of this specific part, I will say that, from my experience, the SSB doesn’t really build the competition squat. At least, not directly. It will help maintain strength in the movement, but the SSB squat is far less technical that the skillset doesn’t really transfer. With the SSB, if your weight falls forward, you can just good morning the weight back up with zero issues, whereas a barbell will try to cut your head off. You can have a much more rounded upperback with the SSB compared to a barebell as well. I would say, if nothing else, consider having some regular barbell work for form practice just to keep that grooved.

However, as a deadlift builder, the SSB is amazing. One of THE greatest movements you could do. Honestly, if I did not care about powerlifting, and only did strongman (or only cared about being stronger in a general sense), I would never do another squat with a barbell, and only use the SSB.

Both yoke bar and front squats feel ok on my knees…and high bar. Really the only thing that bothers it is low bar. I do front squats every now and then too, but I’m a bit of a vagina so I have to use the sting ray. Honestly, I train at home a lot and enjoy squatting with an SSB bar so just looking for a way to keep things fun with the limited space I have.

As for form work, I don’t plan on using it in place of my competition squats, just looking for a way to increase frequency without sacrificing my knee. I currently do my competition squat twice per week and have benefited in the past for more volume, but it starts to bother my knee then. I figured this would allow me to do more squatting, and also have some carry over to the deadlift which I typically only do once per week.

I have a Rogue SSB. I love it! Use it weekly in addition to regular squatting to add in some more volume. I also feel it benefits my DL greatly. I’m weak in my upper back, this forces you to use more upper back. The only problem with the bar is the powder coating. It falls off pretty easily, but not a deal breaker for me. For the price, can’t beat it.

[quote]Rschwitalski wrote:
I have a Rogue SSB. I love it! Use it weekly in addition to regular squatting to add in some more volume. I also feel it benefits my DL greatly. I’m weak in my upper back, this forces you to use more upper back. The only problem with the bar is the powder coating. It falls off pretty easily, but not a deal breaker for me. For the price, can’t beat it.[/quote]

Nice…thanks. I saw a review about the powder coating. Apparently Rogue said they were going to address it, but haven’t heard whether they did or not. With shipping I can get the Elite bar a little cheaper and I’ve used it before so I know what I’m getting, just wondering how they compare. For some reason I didn’t like the molded handle grips on the Yoke bar, but it looks like I can slide them off. How long have you been using yours and have you noticed any carry over?

Just going to chime in here about carryover. I do SSB foam box squats heavy on alternate weeks as a sumo deadlift variation. It has done wonders for my pull. My squat has also exploded recently and you can’t help but wonder if some of that is carryover from all the SSB work. We have the Elite Yoke bar at my gym. Much more durable pad covering than the old Crepinsek SSB bars.

Got my from Ralph Crepinsek at 1500.com
Depending on WHERE you live, try to factor in the shipping costs !
All of them are very comparable to each other…

I can’t put a specific number on my carryover, I just feel I’m able to keep upright better. I’m tighter throughout the lift. If you are the guy that gets forward when shit gets heavy, this is the bar you want. It also makes a great bar for good mornings. Much more comfortable. I’ve never used a yoke bar but I’m sure it is equally comparable if not better than Rogues. I doubt Elitefts would make a shitty SSB. I chose Rogue because I could drive there and I was getting some other stuff from them as well.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]jlburch wrote:

I apologize that I can’t help directly with the question, as I have a new york barbells SSB (which I still love very much), but in terms of this specific part, I will say that, from my experience, the SSB doesn’t really build the competition squat. At least, not directly. It will help maintain strength in the movement, but the SSB squat is far less technical that the skillset doesn’t really transfer. With the SSB, if your weight falls forward, you can just good morning the weight back up with zero issues, whereas a barbell will try to cut your head off. [/quote]

I disagree with this entirely. I train squats with NOTHING other than a SSB and change over to conventional two weeks out from a meet. In my experience, my weights go up when I switch to conventional. Perhaps it has something to do with how you place the bar?

I’m a low bar squatter and find the weight easier to handle in this fashion. With a low bar squat, the barbell can’t cut your head off because the weight is distributed more evenly across your center of gravity.

[quote]late2thegame wrote:

I disagree with this entirely. I train squats with NOTHING other than a SSB and change over to conventional two weeks out from a meet. In my experience, my weights go up when I switch to conventional. Perhaps it has something to do with how you place the bar?

I’m a low bar squatter and find the weight easier to handle in this fashion. With a low bar squat, the barbell can’t cut your head off because the weight is distributed more evenly across your center of gravity.
[/quote]

I use a low bar squat as well in meets/training. When I was speaking about the barbell cutting off your head, I was meaning in terms of the bar rolling forward when your chest falls forward. Like this

I’m sure our different experiences can be chalked up to a whole bunch of different variables, from technique, stance width, leverages, programming, etc. I am glad you can offer a different perspective on the matter.

Ahhh, I see what you meant however I would simply throw it off my back before getting buried like that. Let’s face it, you know when you can’t get out of the hole, no sense getting yourself plastered. :slight_smile:

As with anything, we’re all different and will respond in different ways to training. I like the SSB because my shoulder mobility isn’t that great in my left arm due to plates running up my radius and ulna from an old injury. The decreased mobility places extreme torque on my left bicep tendon when using a conventional bar which impacts my training immensely over time. The SSB helps me avoid injuring the bicep tendon und keeps my training on track.

I guess one never knows unless they give it a whirl.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
With the SSB, if your weight falls forward, you can just good morning the weight back up with zero issues, whereas a barbell will try to cut your head off. [/quote]

I would actually say pretty much the exact opposite of this. The SSB bar forces you to stay somewhat vertical because if you go forward you’re screwed. Where as lots of people have squat-morninged weights close to their max with a regular bar.

[quote]OBoile wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
With the SSB, if your weight falls forward, you can just good morning the weight back up with zero issues, whereas a barbell will try to cut your head off. [/quote]

I would actually say pretty much the exact opposite of this. The SSB bar forces you to stay somewhat vertical because if you go forward you’re screwed. Where as lots of people have squat-morninged weights close to their max with a regular bar.[/quote]

I find I have been far better able to correct the weight with a SSB versus a straight bar due to the immobility of the bar personally.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]OBoile wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
With the SSB, if your weight falls forward, you can just good morning the weight back up with zero issues, whereas a barbell will try to cut your head off. [/quote]

I would actually say pretty much the exact opposite of this. The SSB bar forces you to stay somewhat vertical because if you go forward you’re screwed. Where as lots of people have squat-morninged weights close to their max with a regular bar.[/quote]

I find I have been far better able to correct the weight with a SSB versus a straight bar due to the immobility of the bar personally.[/quote]

The fact that the weight sits much higher on your back with the SSB should make good morning it much more difficult due to the longer lever are. I certainly can’t good morning anywhere near the weight with an SSB than with a regular bar.

How bent forward are you getting that the bar is actually rolling towards your head?

[quote]OBoile wrote:
I would actually say pretty much the exact opposite of this. The SSB bar forces you to stay somewhat vertical because if you go forward you’re screwed. Where as lots of people have squat-morninged weights close to their max with a regular bar.[/quote]

I would concur with this 100%. In fact, this is where I see the transfer over to the straight bar. I can’t tell you how many people comment on my form with a straight bar and ask me how I am so perfect.

I attribute it 100% to my training with a SSB. The SSB forces you to keep your chest up and builds an extremely strong upper back. As a result, when you switch to a conventional bar, it’s much easier to mainain an erect spine and avoid being pushed over in the hole as the weights have a lower CG on your back.

This has been my experience anyway, clearly others don’t see it this way.

[quote]OBoile wrote:
The fact that the weight sits much higher on your back with the SSB should make good morning it much more difficult due to the longer lever are. I certainly can’t good morning anywhere near the weight with an SSB than with a regular bar.

How bent forward are you getting that the bar is actually rolling towards your head?
[/quote]

Oh yeah, you’re definitely not going to use the same weight with the SSB as you would with a straight bar.

The position would be similar to the one in the video I linked.

I may not be explaining myself well here. Jim Wendler wrote about his observation with the form differences between the two movements here, and it’s a sentiment I have experienced as well.

[quote]Conan approved! I don’t recommend this bar for beginners learning to squat â?? it’s a vastly different movement than a normal squat and can be very awkward. But for an experienced squatter this bar is 100% Conan Approved because you can just grunt lift.

Once I un-rack this bar, I make sure I open the knees, sit back a bit, and stay tight. But once I’m at the bottom, all bets are off. I just muscle the weight up with little regard to form. With my hands on the yoke, I drive everything up at the same time, trying to keep my elbows high.

I’m not saying I squat with bad form, it’s simply easier to just squat and not worry about the angle of your pinky toe. It’s a nice refreshing departure from what can become an overcomplicated lift.

The form used with the safety squat bar is far different from a straight bar. This is fine if you’re an experienced squatter, but may confuse the hell out of a beginner. It’s probably not something I’d put a beginner under unless he’s suffering from a shoulder or wrist injury.[/quote]