T Nation

Roger Ebert Dead At 70


http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-roger-ebert-20130405,0,1254116.story

I guess it had to come sooner or later, I’ll be damned if I wasn’t blocking the idea from my mind though.

Ebert was half the reason I got so passionate about cinema as I did, maybe there were a few times I didn’t agree with his reviews, but he has always been one of the most passionate and intense critics in film history. A smart man with an eye for cinema down to it’s finest details.

I remember waiting anxiously to see Ebert’s “At The Movies” when there would be a broadcast episode posted up online, I’d even go out of my way to see all the old shows with Gene Siskel I missed as a child.

Rest In Peace Roger Ebert, you shall be missed.

I was sad to see that, he was one of the few critics I’d actually listen to.

Sometimes when ‘celebrity’ deaths are in the news it makes you shake your head and say who the fuck cares about this?

Then there are times like this where someone passes and the world is worse of for losing that person. RIP.

Was very sad to hear this, I felt the same way with Gene Siskel, Grew up watching At the Movies or Sneak Previews. Always felt they were fair and took movies for what they were…i.e not every movie was intended to be Sophies Choice. Used to love when they would argue…

Hopefully they are watching their favorite flicks together up in heaven!

RIP

Aww Shit. Why am I feeling sad about this? I had a love/hate relationship with him.

RIP, old fart.

[quote]DarkNinjaa wrote:
Aww Shit. Why am I feeling sad about this? I had a love/hate relationship with him.

RIP, old fart.[/quote]

He loved the chocolate.

[quote]optheta wrote:

[quote]DarkNinjaa wrote:
Aww Shit. Why am I feeling sad about this? I had a love/hate relationship with him.

RIP, old fart.[/quote]

He loved the chocolate.[/quote]

Went all Robert DeNiro on dat chocolate.

It almost pains me to make jokes, today has been a sad day.
I kind of wish Peter Travers had gone instead.

R.I.P Mr Ebert

Posting this hilarious review of Rob Reiner’s North by Ebert that Cracked just put up in one of their articles. It’s delightful how much he hated it.

"“Battlefield Earth” is like taking a bus trip with someone who has needed a bath for a long time. It’s not merely bad; it’s unpleasant in a hostile way. The visuals are grubby and drab. The characters are unkempt and have rotten teeth. Breathing tubes hang from their noses like ropes of snot. The soundtrack sounds like the boom mike is being slammed against the inside of a 55-gallon drum. The plot. . . .

But let me catch my breath. This movie is awful in so many different ways. Even the opening titles are cheesy. Sci-fi epics usually begin with a stab at impressive titles, but this one just displays green letters on the screen in a type font that came with my Macintosh. Then the movie’s subtitle unscrolls from left to right in the kind of “effect” you see in home movies.

“Battlefield Earth” was written in 1980 by L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology. The film contains no evidence of Scientology or any other system of thought; it is shapeless and senseless, without a compelling plot or characters we care for in the slightest. The director, Roger Christian, has learned from better films that directors sometimes tilt their cameras, but he has not learned why.

Some movies run off the rails. This one is like the train crash in “The Fugitive.” I watched it in mounting gloom, realizing I was witnessing something historic, a film that for decades to come will be the punch line of jokes about bad movies. There is a moment here when the Psychlos’ entire planet (home office and all) is blown to smithereens, without the slightest impact on any member of the audience (or, for that matter, the cast). If the film had been destroyed in a similar cataclysm, there might have been a standing ovation."

  • Roger Ebert

"It’s been leading up to this all spring. When David Spade got buried in crap in “Joe Dirt,” and when three supermodels got buried in crap in “Head Over Heels,” and when human organs fell from a hot-air balloon in “Monkeybone” and were eaten by dogs, and when David Arquette rolled around in dog crap and a gangster had his testicles bitten off in “See Spot Run,” and when a testicle was eaten in “Tomcats,” well, somehow the handwriting was on the wall. There had to be a movie like “Freddy Got Fingered” coming along.

This movie doesn’t scrape the bottom of the barrel. This movie isn’t the bottom of the barrel. This movie isn’t below the bottom of the barrel. This movie doesn’t deserve to be mentioned in the same sentence with barrels.

The film is a vomitorium consisting of 93 minutes of Tom Green doing things that a geek in a carnival sideshow would turn down. Six minutes into the film, his character leaps from his car to wag a horse penis. This is, we discover, a framing device–to be matched by a scene late in the film where he sprays his father with elephant semen, straight from the source.

Green plays Gord Brody, a 28-year-old who lives at home with his father (Rip Torn), who despises him, and his mother (Julie Hagerty), who wrings her hands a lot. He lives in a basement room still stocked with his high school stuff, draws cartoons and dreams of becoming an animator. Gord would exhaust a psychiatrist’s list of diagnoses. He is unsocialized, hostile, manic and apparently retarded. Retarded? How else to explain a sequence in which a Hollywood animator tells him to “get inside his animals,” and he skins a stag and prances around dressed in the coat, covered with blood? His romantic interest is Betty (Marisa Coughlan), who is disabled and dreams of rocket-powered wheelchairs and oral sex. A different kind of sexual behavior enters the life of his brother Freddy, who gets the movie named after him just because, I suppose, Tom Green thought the title was funny. His character also thinks it is funny to falsely accuse his father of molesting Freddy.

Green’s sense of humor may not resemble yours. Consider a scene where Gord’s best friend busts his knee open while skateboarding. Gord licks the open wound. Then he visits his friend in the hospital. A woman in the next bed goes into labor. Gord rips the baby from her womb and, when it appears to be dead, brings it to life by swinging it around his head by its umbilical cord, spraying the walls with blood. If you wanted that to be a surprise, then I’m sorry I spoiled it for you."

  • Roger Ebert

Every time I read one of those reviews it warms my heart, I love how he never put himself on a pedestal above everyone else and he was humble enough to take into account each and every opinion of his fans and let them help form his own. He’s the kind of funny old man I wish could have been my grandpa growing up, the kind of person you could sit in with every night and talk for hours about a single great scene and never get tired of it.

Tirelessly fought his cancer for eleven years, even losing part of his jaw and his ability to speak, yet throughout all that he persevered so he could continue doing the thing he loves and continue being an inspiration to all the film lovers that spent their lives looking up to the kind of brilliance that he exuded.

I shall take the rest of the night to watch Citizen Kane, in memory of Roger Ebert. See you at the movies, Roger.

I love the fact that he went back to older movies he gave a thumbs down and admitted he made a error, i.e. Blade Runner.

[quote]Big Kahuna wrote:
Every time I read one of those reviews it warms my heart, I love how he never put himself on a pedestal above everyone else and he was humble enough to take into account each and every opinion of his fans and let them help form his own. He’s the kind of funny old man I wish could have been my grandpa growing up, the kind of person you could sit in with every night and talk for hours about a single great scene and never get tired of it.

Tirelessly fought his cancer for eleven years, even losing part of his jaw and his ability to speak, yet throughout all that he persevered so he could continue doing the thing he loves and continue being an inspiration to all the film lovers that spent their lives looking up to the kind of brilliance that he exuded.

I shall take the rest of the night to watch Citizen Kane, in memory of Roger Ebert. See you at the movies, Roger.[/quote]

I’m sitting here in my cube trying to keep from laughing out loud. He had a way with words.

[quote]optheta wrote:
I love the fact that he went back to older movies he gave a thumbs down and admitted he made a error, i.e. Blade Runner.[/quote]

That’s part of what made him so great as a critic in my eyes, he was still humble enough to admit looking back on his past reviews and thinking his own earlier writings were that of a bumbling idiot. There’s not a lot of people whose job is judging another person’s work that are able to display such an admirable trait, especially one so popular and whose ideas are accepted as graciously as Ebert’s.

R.I.P. Roger Ebert. I’m glad Ebert retracted on BLADE RUNNER, but IMHO he was wrong
not recommending FULL METAL JACKET, and Gene Siskel was right back then, because FMJ is considered a classic
now as well.

[quote]Karado wrote:
R.I.P. Roger Ebert. I’m glad Ebert retracted on BLADE RUNNER, but IMHO he was wrong
not recommending FULL METAL JACKET, and Gene Siskel was right back then, because FMJ is considered a classic
now as well.

[/quote]

I love how riled up Ebert got when he was arguing with Siskel, it’s incredibly satisfying to see them bicker back and forth like that.

I think Ebert definitely went off the rails on that review of Full Metal Jacket, I kind of wish it had come out a while apart from Platoon so Ebert’s opinion wasn’t so clouded on the contrasts between the films, and he could admire the humour in Full Metal Jacket without feeling like it wasn’t taking itself seriously enough overall.

[quote]Anonymity wrote:
"“Battlefield Earth” is like taking a bus trip with someone who has needed a bath for a long time. It’s not merely bad; it’s unpleasant in a hostile way. The visuals are grubby and drab. The characters are unkempt and have rotten teeth. Breathing tubes hang from their noses like ropes of snot. The soundtrack sounds like the boom mike is being slammed against the inside of a 55-gallon drum. The plot. . . .

But let me catch my breath. This movie is awful in so many different ways. Even the opening titles are cheesy. Sci-fi epics usually begin with a stab at impressive titles, but this one just displays green letters on the screen in a type font that came with my Macintosh. Then the movie’s subtitle unscrolls from left to right in the kind of “effect” you see in home movies.

“Battlefield Earth” was written in 1980 by L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology. The film contains no evidence of Scientology or any other system of thought; it is shapeless and senseless, without a compelling plot or characters we care for in the slightest. The director, Roger Christian, has learned from better films that directors sometimes tilt their cameras, but he has not learned why.

Some movies run off the rails. This one is like the train crash in “The Fugitive.” I watched it in mounting gloom, realizing I was witnessing something historic, a film that for decades to come will be the punch line of jokes about bad movies. There is a moment here when the Psychlos’ entire planet (home office and all) is blown to smithereens, without the slightest impact on any member of the audience (or, for that matter, the cast). If the film had been destroyed in a similar cataclysm, there might have been a standing ovation."

  • Roger Ebert
    [/quote]

“The film contains no evidence of Scientology”… It was a sci-fi fantasy, written by a fantasist and starred A-list Scientologist John Travolta.

This is something I wrote elsewhere. This really sucks.

Ah crap.

Some people do not agree with me, but he was my favorite movie critic, and one of the best we have. A great writer, screenwriter, a true film scholar, a promoter of movies that otherwise would not ever have been seen, and someone whose reviews I hardly ever, ever found anything but the heartiest agreement with. I knew it was probably the end when he took a “break” from reviewing for “physical therapy” about two months ago, but I wanted to believe that was really the truth. Looks like I was, very unfortunately, right.

Two thumbs up from me for a lifetime of dedication to our modern fine art. You will be sorely missed, Roger Ebert. May God see your soul to heaven.

[quote]DarkNinjaa wrote:
Aww Shit. Why am I feeling sad about this? I had a love/hate relationship with him.

RIP, old fart.[/quote]

You should appreciate him. He always spoke his mind and said exactly what he believed, popular or unpopular.

No facetiousness implied. He was by FAR my favorite critic and will be sorely, sorely missed.

This one hurts a lot more than usual.