T Nation

Right Leg Bigger/Working More Than Left


#1

I hope someone has a piece of advice on this one.
When I squat, I use my right leg more than the left. I'm not tilting right or anything, and I go below parallel. I just seem to squeeze the quads more on the tight, making for a deeper-felt soreness.

My right leg is my main-leg and it is 1-2 cm bigger than the left. They follow the same growth rate, but I fear the right leg will out-grow the left some day.

My remedy so far has been to leg press using the left leg to lead, then leg extensions using only left. I've tried Russel-squats, but I think I'll need an even bigger left-overload to make it worth it - I used 11 lb. I'll do that next leg-day.

The overall problem is, that squat being such a taxing exercise, my "automatics" always take over during the last few reps, and I accidentally press harder with my right leg even though it's not necessary to do the lift.


#2

If your setup is right and you aren’t swaying or tilting, it could just be that you simply feel the right side better than the left.

When i first started doing chin ups i had trouble feeling my lats and biceps on the left
but i could feel the right very good. Of course i am right handed and this is to be expected
But it is similar with unilateral exercises such as lunges although i have never had
Any pronlems with bilateral leg exercises.

If this is the problem you could simply try using a lighter weight and really focusing on the muscular
Contraction to get a better mind muscle connection with your left side. Also i would double
check your setup and take a video to make sure you arent swaying or tilting even slightly


#3

I will try and focus on maximal contraction in the left quad.
So far I’ve mostly focused on not tilting, which I thought was the problem. Close monitoring has shown, that I do not contract the right more or less when tilting (purposely), and that I do not tilt by default.
My buddy would shout out “great lift”, when I actually contracted my right quads more than the left going perfectly straight.

I’ll also try making a bigger difference with the Russel-squats, since the 11 lb wasn’t enough (I still felt my right leg better)…


#4

hmm, maybe try pre-exhausting that leg?


#5

[quote]Yogi wrote:
hmm, maybe try pre-exhausting that leg?[/quote]

Also a fine suggestion. I’ll give that a try too. The leg press and extensions I do after squats.


#6

any injury? range of motion similar?
Can you do similar work with rear leg elevated split squats? Similar ability side to side with pistol squats to a box?
You say you’re good up to a certain rep, then the last few are the dominant side takes over…Cut the set when it you lose focus and symmetry and add a few sets.


#7

Be sure to rule out leg length discrepancy. Differences below 3-4 millimeters shouldn’t be a big deal, but anymore than that and you can have the longer leg slightly stronger, more muscular, and more sore after leg workouts than the shorter leg due to taking more load during bilateral movements and slightly longer range of motion during unilateral movements. Some people can train for years without realizing they have one.


#8

[quote]jp_dubya wrote:
any injury? range of motion similar?

[/quote]
This

Just speaking from personal experience, I know I’ve had a similar issue. I found that one ankle had better mobility than the other, so ROM, while minor, was still a bit hindered on one side, causing me to shift my weight a bit to the other leg. Just something to look at if you haven’t yet.


#9

Go unilateral. Problem solved. You can still build big ass wheels using unilateral movements.