T Nation

Rhino or Thinker?

I think one of the better things about getting older is focus and the increasing the ability to concentrate. Maybe it’s getting to realize what’s important or that time is dripping away.

Just wondering about what other people’s habits are for gaining and maintaining more than that mind-muscle connection - the important mind-iron connection. Rest periods can seem interminable. Sometimes the mind is not willing to see the metal, or will the metal to move. For those who don’t spend that time fraternizing, cavorting, or staring at upper and lower cleavages of yon sweaty skinned babes (or at least not all of the time), I have categorized two types: the rhino and the thinker.

The rhino because of this most excellent clip of Benedikt Magnusson pulling a godforsaken amount in which he reminds me of that Spiderman - the old psychedelic one - villian, the Rhino.


This makes me laugh every time.
The thinker contemplates and approaches rather than attacks.

I am generally a Rhino, though hardly as flamboyant as Benedikt (you have to be really really really strong to do that). I pace and mutter to myself. Once at the bar, though, I am a bit of a thinker and sometimes I think myself out of it. I also find lifts where I am standing easier to keep the neurons set on kill. Getting set on the bench just seems to cause a slight fizzle.

I am also the only one who does things like this that I have seen. Everyone else in the fancy and pansy assed gym I attend either does nothing, wanders about like a three year old, looks at themselves in the freakin mirror (oh, yeah, you’re looking hyooge), or talks on their freakin’ phones (it’s Hong Kong, so the mobiles are almost implanted, which is something I would like to do with them.)

I have also found that caffeine and some Now True Focus definitely help. (sorry, I don’t want to mail order just one bottle of Spike and though they sell Biotest stuff here, they ain’t got that. Yet?)
What about the rest of you? What type and what do you do?

What I would like to know is how can one determine when it’s time to slow down.

I’ve been to sports most in my life - basketball, soccer etc and lifting weights is one thing I enjoyed most . . . to cut the crap . . .

I am 39 years old at 5,11 and am still gaining ground in my poundage - esp in squats. My full squats now is 350 lbs max rep and I usually train squats at full ROM 320lbs x5x5 once a week. Am plannin to go 400lbs next year. ( I go to the gym at least thrice a week and a max of 5 times when office shedule permits).

Friends say, I should slow down, but seem can’t accept the idea of getting “old”.

So, what are the signs that I should watch for in order to heed the advice of slowing down.

Thanks in advance to you guys.

[quote]Eon wrote:
What I would like to know is how can one determine when it’s time to slow down.

I’ve been to sports most in my life - basketball, soccer etc and lifting weights is one thing I enjoyed most . . . to cut the crap . . .

I am 39 years old at 5,11 and am still gaining ground in my poundage - esp in squats. My full squats now is 350 lbs max rep and I usually train squats at full ROM 320lbs x5x5 once a week. Am plannin to go 400lbs next year. ( I go to the gym at least thrice a week and a max of 5 times when office shedule permits).

Friends say, I should slow down, but seem can’t accept the idea of getting “old”.

So, what are the signs that I should watch for in order to heed the advice of slowing down.

Thanks in advance to you guys.[/quote]

Slow down??? Why, you’re only 39 for Christ sake!

I’m 47 and I feel it’s time to wisen up. My body starts to complain when going heavy all the time so I’ll alternate heavy with light periods. After all, we’re training to progress so what’s the point driving ourselves into the ground just to prove we’re not getting old? Listen to your body, you’ll know when it’s time to change, slow down?? never!

In response to the OP I am more rhino than thinker. I am fortunate to have a good set up at home which allows me to crank up the tunes and yell and grunt or freak, before, after or during any lift whenever I feel like it.
It helps when you don’t have a spotter and are trying for a max lift. Believe me.
I don’t play thinking music. I play music that gives me the impetus to lift. That helps as well.
To the second poster…No. There is no age when you should slow down. 39 is not an age where one should consider taking it easy. It’s the exact opposite. It’s when gains come with hard work so either lift hard or waste your time.
Slowing down just isn’t an option.

[quote]grey wrote:
In response to the OP I am more rhino than thinker. I am fortunate to have a good set up at home which allows me to crank up the tunes and yell and grunt or freak, before, after or during any lift whenever I feel like it.[/quote]
Yes, you are lucky. I have an MP3 player and good headphones but it just isn’t the same. Also,not sure if I am yelling sometimes and if my occasional grunts are audible - not that it would matter since many people seem to believe in shouting, I just don’t want to be “that guy.”

I have never had a spotter. They don’t have a power rack at my new gym which makes max bench a less than max affair but I can squat to my legs content since they do have a squat rack.

As to the slowing down. I turn 41 today and just entered the second phase of Thib’s HSS-100, the first body part split I have done after three years of whole body wkouts. It’s a nice change. My dad said I should slow down - yeah, and at 41 he was setting an example by running like a freak. There is no way I want to slow down. I am not happy with my lifts now and I know that I have room to go. When that feeling stops or when I feel that it’s good for my age then I hope I snap out of it and get back to work.
Oh, yeah, nice back grey.

He he he. I like you guys.

Some of the guys at the gym even contend that I do steroids or heavy on supplements. Nah, I have none of that! Budget doesn’t allow it. Mind over matter - how far the body can go on its own - so far I am impressed! Sumo squats of 600 lbs and full squats at 350 isn’t bad for a 39er I think. I do the heavy 600 sumos once in 3 mos - an adjustment from twice in a week due to age consideration :>

I like to do my squats this way : No padding. So when I start the lift I feel the iron against my skin and as I do my reps, I feel the iron searing thru my flesh - that way my focus is partly on the pain on my back and not how heavy I am lifting. After 5 sets - I got this blister on my back - badge of honor.

Be doing the 600lbs sumo squat this July again. Be bringing a cam and hope for somebody to take a picture of me cradling the load.

You guys should try raw steel on your back once in a while.

[quote]Eon wrote:
You guys should try raw steel on your back once in a while.
[/quote]

Who said anything about padding and, unless your talking about a Japanese back walking massage with crampons, we probably have all felt the sweet bite of steel.
That is a sweet sumo number, though. Look forward to a snap.

On the original note: I tried the rhino on squats - just walking up and under then up and back - and thye seemed better, if even I did talk myself out of another rep - must remember to overestimate, dammit.

Yo Wenzi, you did saw those chinese girls discussed on one thread here. They’re pretty cool. I’ve an argument with an officemate that those gals are on steroids - I said no way coz they’re olympic hopefuls and steroids are a no no in Olympics.

Fact is my officemate is just too sissy or too much of sloth in training to improve on his load, so he wants a short cut and wants to do some needle work on his body.

[quote]Eon wrote:
What I would like to know is how can one determine when it’s time to slow down.

I’ve been to sports most in my life - basketball, soccer etc and lifting weights is one thing I enjoyed most . . . to cut the crap . . .

I am 39 years old at 5,11 and am still gaining ground in my poundage - esp in squats. My full squats now is 350 lbs max rep and I usually train squats at full ROM 320lbs x5x5 once a week. Am plannin to go 400lbs next year. ( I go to the gym at least thrice a week and a max of 5 times when office shedule permits).

Friends say, I should slow down, but seem can’t accept the idea of getting “old”.

So, what are the signs that I should watch for in order to heed the advice of slowing down.

Thanks in advance to you guys.[/quote]

I’m worried that someone in 2006 thinks that 39 years old is truly “old”.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
I’m worried that someone in 2006 thinks that 39 years old is truly “old”.[/quote]

Exactly. Perhaps we should change this forum to the “Over 50” lifter. Not that I consider over 50 to be old…

[quote]Eon wrote:
Yo Wenzi, you did saw those chinese girls discussed on one thread here. They’re pretty cool. I’ve an argument with an officemate that those gals are on steroids - I said no way coz they’re olympic hopefuls and steroids are a no no in Olympics.
[/quote]
Well, no steroids in the Oly’s is going to get a few laughs around here. Do a search for Charlie Francis, he was Ben Johnson’s coach way back and had a few things to say about it. Since China is pretty much a closed nation, they can go the old East German route of massive programs of controlled juicing. There’s a flickr site of images and one of them is the nutrition lab for the women’s program - bunch of white lab coats and test tubes. However, they are still friggin’ strong and train like demons - it’s one way to get out of the boondocks.

As to 39 being old: I went to the HK bodybuilding champs, an IFBB sanctioned event, and waited for the masters to roll out - man, they were the biggest guys of the night to that point. - that ain’t saying much, since I just got to the 70kg and under open men’s event.