T Nation

Resistant Starch

So far definitely noticing extra gas. Fingers crossed that this is a good thing. I mixed coconut (water) kefir with the starch and let stand 10-15 minutes prior to drinking. Also mixed in some sodium bicarbonate as an additional measure to allow a little more of the friendly bacteria to reach the intestines.

Was using about a teaspoon and am glad I didn’t do more. I’m thinking I should ramp up more slowly (i.e. half teaspoon max for 7 days). I’m hoping that the reaction is a good sign in that the gassiness indicates I have a lot of room to improve - my reaction to RS will become more tolerable as my gut microflora balance out more beneficially!

Also, exploring the food route option, I had some cold black eyed peas, asparagus, and lightly cooked garlic with dinner (on top of my daily onion), all of which are good sources of RS. Marks daily apple has a good write up about this topic if anyone is interested.

[quote]BulletproofTiger wrote:
…mixed in some sodium bicarbonate as an additional measure to allow a little more of the friendly bacteria to reach the intestines.

Marks daily apple has a good write up about this topic if anyone is interested.[/quote]

Can you explain the benefits of Sodium Bicarb?

Marks daily apple is a pretty cool website, I like the way he changes focus based on the latest research and is not bogged down in dogma. Yer man over at freetheanimal has some excellent discussions on the topic and was the first to propose BRM-PS as a RS supplement. He has forum members experimenting with this topic and posting their views on the outcomes, very interesting and informative.

The theoretical benefit of sodium bicarbonate in this instance is that it will reduce stomach acid (raise ph as it is basic), and drastically so dose depending. Oral probiotics are almost entirely wiped out by stomach acid if ones stomach acid level is ideal. Hence less stomach acid, more probiotics reach the target, in theory. This messes up digestion however (especially meat) and this would not be healthy done long term, especially within an hour or to prior to meals. Just for a point of reference, I used about a teaspoon although this is admittedly not too scientific beyond the theory.

[quote]BulletproofTiger wrote:
The theoretical benefit of sodium bicarbonate in this instance is that it will reduce stomach acid (raise ph as it is basic), and drastically so dose depending. Oral probiotics are almost entirely wiped out by stomach acid if ones stomach acid level is ideal. Hence less stomach acid, more probiotics reach the target, in theory. This messes up digestion however (especially meat) and this would not be healthy done long term, especially within an hour or to prior to meals. Just for a point of reference, I used about a teaspoon although this is admittedly not too scientific beyond the theory.[/quote]

Thanks for that. It sounds like a good idea in the short term.

What is your opinion on enteric coated probiotics (Berardi recommends them) or so called acid resistant probiotics like LP299V?

…you know the best solution to all these attempts at colonising the colon is a faecal anenima’ I wonder is there a DIY version of that, seriously? Not going to look that one up on the work computer just in case!

I read an interesting article on the gut microbiome and the author likened the gut to a rainforest, with many species and specific environmental conditions that allowed certain species to flourish and others not to flourish. Taking probiotics is like throwing a few seeds into the forest and expecting to make a significant change, whereas altering your diet is like changing the soil and the weather: get it right and the good stuff will flourish. Sums it up about right.

PDF List of RS food’s

Speaking of RS, I’d always suspected that it is important for my digestive health without even knowing of its existence. Stool quality is much better when I eat a banana or two that still has green tips every day. Have always had a fair amount of rolled oats and potatoes in my diet, but often find that coffee, supplements such as magnesium and vitamin C as well as acidic foods make my intestines rumble. I reckon that for a “good day” to happen, I’d need to be taking in about 35-40 grams of RS, assuming the following wiki-chart is accurate:

I wasn’t reacting too well to the RS (at the teaspoon sized dose at least), so i figured, my “colony” is weak. I devised an idea: I’ve taken some resistant starch (40 grams), about 20 grams of powdered sugar, and mixed in a mug with water and yogurt starter (L.bulgaricus, S.thermophilus, L.acidophilus). That should supercharge overnight at room temp (sealed with saran wrap and a rubber band. Hoping there is a slight bulge to the saran wrap in the AM. Gonna drink about a quarter in the morning mixed with a teaspoon of sodium bicarb, and see how that goes. Should be like filling the forest with seeds and cow manure if all goes well.

add some psyllium

[quote]Yogi wrote:
add some psyllium

http://drbganimalpharm.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/how-to-cure-sibo-small-intestinal-bowel_18.html[/quote]

Thanks for the tip! My creation was not at all fermented this morning. I could still taste the powdered sugar strongly. Maybe the culture was old/bad, or maybe just needs more time.

Here’s another tip: I placed the mug on top of my DVR to keep it slightly warm. I don’t remember where I heard that, but it’s a yogurt making tip to keep it just warm enough, without getting too hot to kill the culture. What was recommended was doing yogurt in a mason jar.

[quote]BulletproofTiger wrote:

[quote]Yogi wrote:
add some psyllium

http://drbganimalpharm.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/how-to-cure-sibo-small-intestinal-bowel_18.html[/quote]

Thanks for the tip! My creation was not at all fermented this morning. I could still taste the powdered sugar strongly. Maybe the culture was old/bad, or maybe just needs more time.

Here’s another tip: I placed the mug on top of my DVR to keep it slightly warm. I don’t remember where I heard that, but it’s a yogurt making tip to keep it just warm enough, without getting too hot to kill the culture. What was recommended was doing yogurt in a mason jar.[/quote]

brother refined sugar is going to feed the bad bacteria in your gut, which is the exact opposite of what you’re trying to do with the RS.

Have you considered kefir? The grains aren’t expensive and last forever if you treat them right.

Have you guys thought of adding RS to keifer?

I was thinking of doing this but my keifer turned to shite, so I chucked it out (I wasn’t using grains). We are told that the probiotics adhere to RS so it would be safe to assume that if we left some RS in a live medium overnight, as BPT suggested, then we should get a powerful AM stomach bomb that would spread nothing but love into our foul intestines?

Must go to the Polish shop and get me some keifer…

the dude at freetheanimal.com is apparently a big fan of adding RS to his kefir

I’m late to the party; and this question may be a bit of a sidetrack.

What’s the verdict on inulin?

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:
I’m late to the party; and this question may be a bit of a sidetrack.

What’s the verdict on inulin?
[/quote]

great if you can tolerate it, but a lot of people with gut problems can’t

My poop turned green. Back to probiotics and psyllium for the time being.

I’ve been having good luck by microwaving a white potato, putting it in the refrigerator over night to let the RS form as it cools, then eating 1/2 of the cold potato in the morning and the rest later in the day. Supposedly if you run multiple heat/cold cycles on the potato, more RS will form, but I haven’t tried this yet.

I usually do this once a week and it seems to last. Bowel movements are remarkable consistent after eating the RS in the potato.

[quote]yorik wrote:
I’ve been having good luck by microwaving a white potato, putting it in the refrigerator over night to let the RS form as it cools, then eating 1/2 of the cold potato in the morning and the rest later in the day. Supposedly if you run multiple heat/cold cycles on the potato, more RS will form, but I haven’t tried this yet.

I usually do this once a week and it seems to last. Bowel movements are remarkable consistent after eating the RS in the potato.[/quote]

That’s right. I simply steam them and leave them in the fridge. Roasting them creates more RS apparently. It’s a handy way to get your carbs in plus RS. Cooled boiled rice is exceptionally high in RS, the highest I think even compared to spuds.

[quote]SLAINGE wrote:

[quote]yorik wrote:
I’ve been having good luck by microwaving a white potato, putting it in the refrigerator over night to let the RS form as it cools, then eating 1/2 of the cold potato in the morning and the rest later in the day. Supposedly if you run multiple heat/cold cycles on the potato, more RS will form, but I haven’t tried this yet.

I usually do this once a week and it seems to last. Bowel movements are remarkable consistent after eating the RS in the potato.[/quote]

That’s right. I simply steam them and leave them in the fridge. Roasting them creates more RS apparently. It’s a handy way to get your carbs in plus RS. Cooled boiled rice is exceptionally high in RS, the highest I think even compared to spuds. [/quote]

mate where are you getting your info on RS content? I weigh my carbs out uncooked and am having a hard time trying to find out how much RS 100g of uncooked rice would have after I’ve cooked and cooled it.

[quote]Yogi wrote:

[quote]SLAINGE wrote:

[quote]yorik wrote:
I’ve been having good luck by microwaving a white potato, putting it in the refrigerator over night to let the RS form as it cools, then eating 1/2 of the cold potato in the morning and the rest later in the day. Supposedly if you run multiple heat/cold cycles on the potato, more RS will form, but I haven’t tried this yet.

I usually do this once a week and it seems to last. Bowel movements are remarkable consistent after eating the RS in the potato.[/quote]

That’s right. I simply steam them and leave them in the fridge. Roasting them creates more RS apparently. It’s a handy way to get your carbs in plus RS. Cooled boiled rice is exceptionally high in RS, the highest I think even compared to spuds. [/quote]

mate where are you getting your info on RS content? I weigh my carbs out uncooked and am having a hard time trying to find out how much RS 100g of uncooked rice would have after I’ve cooked and cooled it.[/quote]

There is a pdf file on the first page, last post, which details everything.

Note all this is AS EATEN…
Spuds - cooked and cooled 3.2g RS per 100g
Spuds - steamed and cooled 5.8g RS per 100g
Spuds - roasted and cooled 19.2g RS per 100g (and they’re tastier)
Whole Rice - cooked and cooled 5.48g per 100g

I stand corrected on the RS content of spuds v rice…the roasties are really high! I normally do fresh chips in the oven, so happy days!

Nice, that’s good info. With all the cooked and cooled rice I’ll be eating I’ll easily hit the 32g of RS they recommend with the addition of a spoonful or two of potato starch