T Nation

Resin for Deadlifting?

Has anyone ever used resin for deadlifting? Is it similar to chalk? Is it better than chalk? Thanks for any replies.

seems like it would be a little messy. I have used chalk forever and it still works as great as the first day I used it. Do you have a chalk allergy?

I personally haven’t used it, but a couple of boys in the Highland games that I participated in were using it for the hammer toss. I happened to be next in line after them for tossing the hammer and found that their left over resin was so effective that I had a hard time letting go of the damn thing. I’ve used chalk for deadlifting, but in my opinion the resin would probably be much more effective, but also much more messier if its the same stuff i’m thinking about.

[quote]RIT Jared wrote:
seems like it would be a little messy. I have used chalk forever and it still works as great as the first day I used it. Do you have a chalk allergy?[/quote]

I don’t have a chalk allergy. I just have a horrible grip and if resin was better than chalk I was going to give it a try.

[quote]ohagajosh wrote:
I personally haven’t used it, but a couple of boys in the Highland games that I participated in were using it for the hammer toss. I happened to be next in line after them for tossing the hammer and found that their left over resin was so effective that I had a hard time letting go of the damn thing. I’ve used chalk for deadlifting, but in my opinion the resin would probably be much more effective, but also much more messier if its the same stuff i’m thinking about.[/quote]

If resin is messy, I may have to give it pass. It sounds like it works great though.

I’ve used both and I find both work fairly well; although resin just feels so much stickier while chalk dries my hands out… no allergy I can think of but nevertheless the resulting chalk clouds bother the other gym sheep (heh heh)

It would also help to work on your grip independently of the DL itself as well since you mention that your grip “sucks”
It will come in time.

basementD, have you looked into a product called Tacky? I think it’s basically handball glue used in strongman competitions. There’s even spray-on products.

Just do the following search on Google:

powerlifting grip Tacky

Option #2 is fat bar training. Fat (or thick) bars can be made or purchased.

[quote]Tampa-Terry wrote:
basementD, have you looked into a product called Tacky? I think it’s basically handball glue used in strongman competitions. There’s even spray-on products.

Just do the following search on Google:

powerlifting grip Tacky

Option #2 is fat bar training. Fat (or thick) bars can be made or purchased.[/quote]

Terry,

Thanks for the info. I will work on my grip in addition to trying a grip aid. The sad thing is that I once had a decent grip.

basementD, I’m sure your grip is far superior to mine. (grin) That’s why I’ve been researching fat bars (aka thick bars) and trying to figure out if I can get away with making one, cheaper than buying one.

I read somewhere that someone said they were able to close a COC#2 with no grip training whatsoever . . . except for the fat bar they used in their workouts.

[quote]Tampa-Terry wrote:

I read somewhere that someone said they were able to close a COC#2 with no grip training whatsoever . . . except for the fat bar they used in their workouts.
[/quote]

Now that’s impressive!! I may have to look into getting a fat bar also.

[quote]basementD wrote:
The sad thing is that I once had a decent grip.
[/quote]

What happened? Did you get married and have to overtrain your grip?

Stickum is a resin spray available from Elitefts.com. It really sticks, the problem is that it’s terrible to get off. If your grip is as bad as you say, train with a double overhand grip till you can’t hold the bar any longer. Then Switch to a mixed grip till fatigued. Then add straps.

The stickum just keeps your hands from sliding, not increasind your grip limit.

As for a homemade fatbar, try this.

Go to a home improvement center (be sure to take a 5lb. plate with you) and go the the plumbing section. I believe it’s 1 1/2" thick wall iron pipe that will just fit into the plate. Have then cut it to a 7’ length. Yes, they have the equipment and don’t get the new end threaded. From thier, find a person with a welder and have them weld a 5lb plate on each side 12" in. I have one like this and it holds plenty. The total cost is less than $30 including the two plates.

Breakdown, you funny boy! (laughing)

BasementD, I just ordered my fat bar from a NY Barbell distributor in Cleveland, Ohio, fitnesserve.com. I got a 2" diameter fat bar for $68 + $30 S&H. I had to get collars, too, for another $20. It’s rated up to 600 pounds, so I’ll have to upgrade to a better bar when I start pulling 600. (grin)

For specialty work, the price is right. If I were an elite PL or strongman, I’d buy one of the more expensive bars with a higher tensile strength.

Anyway, read up on fat bar training and come to your own conclusions. In addition to strengthening grip, using a fat bar strengthens the wrists, too, something else I dearly need.

The only caveat is that if you’ve never done fat bar work before, you need to ease into it. You’ll also be pulling/pushing lesser weight with a fat bar.

Is CoC 200lbs? I can easily close the 200lb Heavy Gripper and I haven’t done any grip training at all… I’d have thought that most people with a deadlift over 350lbs would be able to do this.

[quote]Breakdown wrote:
basementD wrote:
The sad thing is that I once had a decent grip.

What happened? Did you get married and have to overtrain your grip?[/quote]

LOL!! I just lost interest in grip training and neglected my grip.

[quote]basementD wrote:
Tampa-Terry wrote:

I read somewhere that someone said they were able to close a COC#2 with no grip training whatsoever . . . except for the fat bar they used in their workouts.

Now that’s impressive!! I may have to look into getting a fat bar also.
[/quote]

I’ve seen some made with pvc and pipe insulation. Dissasemble the bar, slide on pvc with foam inside, reassemble, done.

Or this method …"How To Make an Inexpensive “Thick-Handled Bar”
By Major Bob “Tuna” Schutz, USMC

I have a very inexpensive way to make a thick-handled bar.

Start with a standard bar or 1" steel. The easiest way is to take the bar to the local hardware store and find your way to the PVC section.?? Select a diameter of PVC that slips over the bar snugly. Then choose the next diameter of PVC that will slip over the first piece of PVC you have placed on the bar. Continue to add PVC in this manner until you have the thickness you desire.

The PVC selection complete, take your PVC home and cut it to the desired length for the bar. To keep the PVC from shifting from side to side I use a 1.25 pound plate on each side of the PVC, and a Bulldog collar to lock each side down. Put a little cloth tape on the PVC and, “Voila”, your grip training is smoking.

Two notes. First there are two different types of PVC for hot and cold water. The main difference is the thickness of the wall of the pipe, so experiment until you get the right size and fit for the bar. Second, if the standard bar has those cute little welded-on collars do not let this deter you. The answer is a few whacks with a big hammer and the collars WILL come off. It may require some twisting with a pipe wrench; just think of this as grip training.

I have used my home made bar for two years now and it is still going strong. I have made long dumbbell in a similar fashion, and they are great for the farmers walk and side bends, because the weights do not rub on your thighs. I thought this might save folks a few bucks.

Awesome contribution there, Violent!