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Researchers Find 'Fat-Burner' Compounds

Researchers Find ‘Fat-Burner’ Compounds
New discovery could reduce health risk of high-fat foods

Just as additives help gasoline burn cleaner, a research report published in the January 2008 print issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that the food industry could take a similar approach toward reducing health risks associated with fatty foods.

[b]These ‘meal additives’ would be based on work of Israeli researchers who discovered that consuming polyphenols (natural compounds in red wine, fruits, and vegetables) simultaneously with high-fat foods might reduce health risks associated with these foods.

‘We suggest a new hypothesis to explain polyphenols[/b],’ said Joseph Kanner, senior author of the report. ‘For the first time, these compounds were demonstrated to prevent significantly the appearance of toxic food derivative compounds in human plasma.’

For the study, six men and four women were fed three different meals consisting of dark meat turkey cutlets.

One meal, the control, consisted of turkey meat and water. The second meal consisted of turkey meat with polyphenols added after cooking (one tablespoon of concentrated wine) followed with a glass of red wine (about 7 ounces). The third meal consisted of turkey meat with polyphenols added before cooking and then followed by a glass of wine.

At various points during the study, researchers took blood and urine samples to measure levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a natural byproduct of fat digestion known to increase the risk for heart disease and other chronic conditions.

They found that MDA levels nearly quintupled after the control meal, while MDA was nearly eliminated after subjects consumed the meals with polyphenols.

‘As long as deep fried candy bars are on menus, scientists will need to keep serving up new ways to prevent the cellular damage caused by these very tasty treats,’ said Gerald Weissmann, MD, Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal, the journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States.

This study suggests that the time will come where people can eat french fries without plugging their arteries.’

This suggests a new protocol for taking REZ-V, popping (amount?) pills after meals…OK TC, whaddaya’ think?..

Might have some promise, buy IMO it would have been a much more impressive study if the “control meal” was a super-sized #3 at McDonalds rather than one of the leanest meats available… Seriously, a cup of coffee can change blood lipid level…

[quote]Blacksnake wrote:
TC & Co., Take note!..
Researchers Find ‘Fat-Burner’ Compounds
New discovery could reduce health risk of high-fat foods

Just as additives help gasoline burn cleaner, a research report published in the January 2008 print issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that the food industry could take a similar approach toward reducing health risks associated with fatty foods.

[b]These ‘meal additives’ would be based on work of Israeli researchers who discovered that consuming polyphenols (natural compounds in red wine, fruits, and vegetables) simultaneously with high-fat foods might reduce health risks associated with these foods.

‘We suggest a new hypothesis to explain polyphenols[/b],’ said Joseph Kanner, senior author of the report. ‘For the first time, these compounds were demonstrated to prevent significantly the appearance of toxic food derivative compounds in human plasma.’

For the study, six men and four women were fed three different meals consisting of dark meat turkey cutlets.

One meal, the control, consisted of turkey meat and water. The second meal consisted of turkey meat with polyphenols added after cooking (one tablespoon of concentrated wine) followed with a glass of red wine (about 7 ounces). The third meal consisted of turkey meat with polyphenols added before cooking and then followed by a glass of wine.

At various points during the study, researchers took blood and urine samples to measure levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a natural byproduct of fat digestion known to increase the risk for heart disease and other chronic conditions.

They found that MDA levels nearly quintupled after the control meal, while MDA was nearly eliminated after subjects consumed the meals with polyphenols.

‘As long as deep fried candy bars are on menus, scientists will need to keep serving up new ways to prevent the cellular damage caused by these very tasty treats,’ said Gerald Weissmann, MD, Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal, the journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States.

This study suggests that the time will come where people can eat french fries without plugging their arteries.’
[/quote]

The problem is that this study is based on the assumption that there is a correlation between dietary fat and heart disease, which is just plain wrong. Sure, polyphenols look promising, but a study like this is not easy to draw conclusions from. Basically, it shows polyphenols caused a change in ONE chemical in the blood, nothing more.

It’s also interesting that the two foods mentioned, fried candy bars and french fries, are both vilified because they are fatty, not because they contain simple carbohydrates.

Veggies and tea contain polyphenols. So maybe you could actually eat some vegtables and drink some tea with your fatty meals instead of using more additives. Additives that industry would probably use incorrectly for price reasons. Or even better, eat fatty meals that are full of good fats. Im sure that combination would prevent heart desease more so then any added nutrients.

But i guess its good to know that the food industry has some small things it could use to offset the damage it does. But at most they are bandaid solutions. They wont impact all the problems of unhealthy fats. Some behavioural changes must be made.

You don’t need to waste your money on supplements such as rez-v. Just consume some more natural stuff like wine, or tea.