T Nation

Reps for Muscular Endurance?

When doing low resistance/high repetition exercises for increasing strength-endurance, how often is one supposed to increase the number of repetitions and by how much for a given exercise?

I asked a very similiar question, see this thread:

[quote]Bull_Scientist wrote:
When doing low resistance/high repetition exercises for increasing strength-endurance, how often is one supposed to increase the number of repetitions and by how much for a given exercise? [/quote]
Just wondering, what’s your exact goal that requires low weight, high rep training?

Technically, strength-endurance is slightly different than muscular endurance. Strength-endurance is, basically, being “strong” for a long time. Muscular endurance is, basically, just being able to “go” for a long time.

With that said, this article might have some info you can use:

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]Bull_Scientist wrote:
When doing low resistance/high repetition exercises for increasing strength-endurance, how often is one supposed to increase the number of repetitions and by how much for a given exercise? [/quote]
Just wondering, what’s your exact goal that requires low weight, high rep training?

Technically, strength-endurance is slightly different than muscular endurance. Strength-endurance is, basically, being “strong” for a long time. Muscular endurance is, basically, just being able to “go” for a long time.

With that said, this article might have some info you can use:


[/quote]

My exact goal is to increase the structural strength of my muscles, ligaments, tendons, and fascaie in order to prepare them for lifting heavy loads in the future. In order to increase the structural strength of my muscles and fibrous connective tissues I need to strength train with low resistance/high repetitions.

What I am trying to get at, is how does one properly increase the amount of volume in the workouts in order to prevent any sort of injury or chronic soreness? Because I heard of people who even though make progressive gains in their muscular endurance workouts, end up actually getting soreness after every one of those workouts as a consequence of increasing the volume or the amount of reps too fast.

do you even lift… ?

[quote]fr0IVIan wrote:
do you even lift… ?[/quote]

^this…well said ! Some people just need to turn their brain(?) off and lift heavy.

Paralysis through analysis…seriously : ) Find a program (5/3/1, westside, chaos+pain)

and stick with the shit for a year…

[quote]killerDIRK wrote:

[quote]fr0IVIan wrote:
do you even lift… ?[/quote]

^this…well said ! Some people just need to turn their brain(?) off and lift heavy.

Paralysis through analysis…seriously : ) Find a program (5/3/1, westside, chaos+pain)

and stick with the shit for a year…[/quote]

x2 You’re overthinking too much

[quote]PlainPat wrote:

[quote]killerDIRK wrote:

[quote]fr0IVIan wrote:
do you even lift… ?[/quote]
^this…well said ! Some people just need to turn their brain(?) off and lift heavy.
…[/quote]
x2 You’re overthinking too much[/quote]
x3.

You’re treading dangerously close to crossing the border between thinking too much instead of learning from experience, especially considering the other HTMU thread you recently started.

If you cross your heart and promise to actually get in the gym and train within the next 48 hours, I’ll continue. Okay? Okay.

It sounds like you’re talking about anatomical adaptation. It has some validity (I especially use it with younger athletes), but it’s by no means absolutely necessary to train with light weights/higher reps prior to advancing to other training schemes.

A low-to-moderate rep range with relatively-light to moderate weights and moderate total volume can also serve to strengthen those support structures (tendons, ligaments, etc), while serving the dual purpose of more directly encouraging strength and muscle growth comapred to higher reps.

Injury prevention is a combination of proper exercise technique and appropriate volume/recovery. Using crap form can cause injury regardless of training volume, and the wear and tear from training too much/too soon or not allowing for complete recovery between session will also get you farther down the path to injury.

Some soreness is expected with beginner lifters. It’s primarily dealt with by maximizing workout nutrition and other recovery methods (foam rolling, proper warm-up). Training to muscle failure or beyond will also increase soreness.

As I mentioned earlier, training for “muscular endurance” is not an effective way to build muscle. With that style of training, I’d expect soreness after each workout because you’re introducing the muscles to a higher levels of fatigue/lactic acid in each session, with little other benefit. There’s no real way around it because, basically, the only way to build that kind of endurance is to keep pushing into the kinds of rep ranges that [i[do[/i] create more soreness.

Also, you keep talking about increasing volume, managing volume, adjusting volume. With bodybuilding, it’s not all about volume. Intensity (weight lifted) is a very significant factor too. But I don’t mean to throw another variable into the mix for you to overanalyze now.

And as a reminder, after having read all this, you do need to get into the gym today or tomorrow and let the barbell teach you what it can.