T Nation

Repping Out on Deadlifts?


#1

What are all of ya experiences with repping out deadlifts? Like anywhere from 10+ reps to maybe even getting 7-10 on a 5+ week. Personally, I god damn hate it. Anything above 5 reps sucks if you ask me. I was supposed to push my 5+ week of 5/3/1 (running 90% of actual max as training max) and right after I've gotten my 5th rep, I just gave up.

Is it a lack of willpower or is there any concrete evidences behind why working with high(er) reps on some movements such as the deadlift just feels like shit? I'm totally fine with doing higher reps (15 to 20 rep range) for assistance exercises such as seated cable rows and etc.


#2

I’m currently not doing deadlifts right now as I tweaked my shoulder getting a little too nuts with repping out deadlifts. I’m planning to add them back in next cycle and confining that lift to 5’s progression only. I got into the mindset that if I could keep picking the bar up, I’ just keep going. Finally took a video and it was real ugly, especially on the way down.

I’m definitely not saying that repping out deadlifts causes injury, but it’s something you need some real awareness on. If you have solid form and do it responsibly (leaving a rep or two in the tank as instructed) it’s probably great, I’m just not there yet.


#3

With deadlifts I pick and choose my battles when to really push for a PR depending on how I feel that day. On all training cycles on the 5+ week I just do required reps and move on but on the 3’s and 5/3/1 week I always intend to push as hard as I can that day. Some cycles have been 6-8 reps and others have been 3-5. Deadlifts recruit a ton of muscle and are brutal at a heavy weight but also are (to me) the most rewarding exercise physically and mentally.

I feel your pain when going above 5 reps on a deadlift being hard but it’s no different than going above 5 reps on a squat. Do they both suck? HELL YEAH!! But it takes a little bit of mental fortitude to turn your brain off and let your body takeover. You just have to want to do it!


#4

I found that learning how to hold my breath for a long time helped a lot with high rep deadlifts. I try to get in as many as I can with one big breath. If I try to breathe in between breaths, I lose a light of tightness, form goes to crap, and strength is down.

This also means every week I blow out a ton of blood vessels in my face, traps, upper back, and chest, but that’s still sorta cool I guess.

That said, I only pull touch and go in training, but even with dead stops in competitions I’ve used this strategy (to include a 35 rep set of car deadlifts in my last contest…that sucked).


#5

35?!

Did somebody get 34 right before you? Or were you just showing off?

Did you finish the rest of the contest? No dis, were the points worth the exertion?

Jeez.


#6

[quote]FlatsFarmer wrote:
35?!

Did somebody get 34 right before you? Or were you just showing off?

Did you finish the rest of the contest? No dis, were the points worth the exertion?

Jeez.

[/quote]

The number to beat at the time was 28. I thought 35 would really put me in the clear, but some bastard came by and did 37 at the end, haha.

However, those 37 reps took a lot more out of him they than 35 did out of me, so it DID end up allowing me to beat him on some other events, so maybe it worked out in the end.

My lesson learned was to just always give it my all, because I actually started downshifting once I got past 29 reps, and if I had blasted all the way to 40, I may have been the winner of the event. It didn’t really take a lot out of me though. I had to lie down for a while, but I was good to go for the next event/rest of the contest.


#7

Train hard so the competition is easy! Develop a “secret weapon” like inhuman recovery.

High rep, non-breathing, deadlifts.
Practice the technique of “hitching” so you can grind out extra strongman dl reps.

What else you got?


#8

I am in the same boat at age 43 - so I just do a 3s Progression or Advanced 531 for deadlifts, this works better for me versus the wide strength variance I get from trying to push reps every week.

Every few cycles, I do high rep work using 65% or 70% of my TM and after my work set, I target 20 reps, which I will always get by week 3 by increasing reps every week. Just have to eat an extra meal or two per day during these cycles. The high rep work also fixes my weak grip.


#9

[quote]FlatsFarmer wrote:
Train hard so the competition is easy! Develop a “secret weapon” like inhuman recovery.

High rep, non-breathing, deadlifts.
Practice the technique of “hitching” so you can grind out extra strongman dl reps.

What else you got?[/quote]

I can definitely share some ideas on my training log/a separate forum. There is a link to my blog in my profile as well. I don’t want to clutter this thread up too much with less on topic stuff. Thanks for the comments.


#10

Yes it’s hard, yes it sucks. But do you really want to stop it because it’s hard? Cut the weight, aim for quality of higher reps for a cycle until you get conditioned to the work and move up from there.


#11

[quote]jblues85 wrote:
With deadlifts I pick and choose my battles when to really push for a PR depending on how I feel that day. On all training cycles on the 5+ week I just do required reps and move on but on the 3’s and 5/3/1 week I always intend to push as hard as I can that day. Some cycles have been 6-8 reps and others have been 3-5. Deadlifts recruit a ton of muscle and are brutal at a heavy weight but also are (to me) the most rewarding exercise physically and mentally.[/quote]

Agree completely.